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340 records – page 1 of 34.

A 10-year follow-up study of tick-borne encephalitis in the Stockholm area and a review of the literature: need for a vaccination strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35021
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Haglund
M. Forsgren
G. Lindh
L. Lindquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Stockholm Country Council, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - complications
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sensation Disorders - complications
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
143 people treated for tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) were included in a retrospective follow-up study. Sequelae and epidemiological characteristics in 114 individuals were analysed. The case fatality rate and the prevalence of residual paresis were low, 1.4 and 2.7%, respectively. However, 40 (35.7%) individuals were found to have a postencephalitic syndrome after a median follow-up time of 47 months, and a majority (77.5%) of these were classified as moderate to severe. Various mental disorders, balance and co-ordination disorders and headache were the most frequently reported symptoms. Increasing age was correlated to a longer duration of hospital stay, longer convalescence and increased risk of permanent sequelae. Results from a neuropsychiatric questionnaire showed marked differences between the subjects with sequelae compared to controls. 57% had noticed a tick bite before admission, and 48% were aware of at least one person in their environment who previously had contracted TBE. 79% were permanent residents or visited endemic areas often and regularly. In conclusion, we have found that TBE in the Stockholm area has a low case fatality rate, but gives rise to a considerable number of different neurological and mental sequelae, which justifies vaccination of a defined risk population in endemic areas.
PubMed ID
8863349 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the department for psychiatric patients with severe somatic diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231490
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(8):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D A Zaitsev
A L Margulis
N G Dedova
A F Skvortsov
A A Artamonov
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(8):41-3
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitalization
Humans
Mental Disorders - complications
Moscow
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Organizational forms of health care delivery for patients with combined somatic and mental pathology have been analyzed. The characteristics of the system of referrals, hospital admissions and treatment in psychiatric departments for patients with combined severe somatic and mental pathology is described. The basic tasks and functions of such departments are listed. Somatic diseases are presented according to the groups of diseases, most frequently occurring in mentally ill patients.
PubMed ID
2799471 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Oct 6;109(7):603-5 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-1973
Author
J. Ruedy
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Oct 6;109(7):603-5 passim
Date
Oct-6-1973
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amphetamine - poisoning
Antidepressive Agents - poisoning
Cocaine - poisoning
Diazepam - poisoning
Diphenhydramine - poisoning
Diuresis
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Gastric Lavage
Heroin - poisoning
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - poisoning
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Methaqualone - poisoning
Poisoning - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Resuscitation
Substance-Related Disorders
Suicide
Unconsciousness
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Abstract
In a prospective study of 349 patients with acute poisoning treated at The Montreal General Hospital in 1972 benzodiazepines and non-barbiturate hypnotics were found to be the most frequent putative drugs. Of the 108 patients admitted to hospital 37% had taken an overdose of a drug prescribed for them by their psychiatrist or other physician; 48% had formerly taken an overdose of drugs and 44% had had previous psychiatric treatment. Unconsciousness, respiratory depression, metabolic acidosis and acidemia, and hypokalemia were the most frequent clinical abnormalities observed. Treatment was supportive. There were six deaths. The average duration of coma was short; only five surviving patients remained unconscious for more than 24 hours. Respiratory complications were frequent.It is recommended that more attention be paid to recognizing patients whose behaviour pattern might include such an impulsive gesture, and that alternatives be found for barbiturate and non-barbiturate hypnotics.
Notes
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1963 Jun;10:97-914021699
Cites: Mod Treat. 1971 Aug;8(3):461-5024942276
PubMed ID
4742490 View in PubMed
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Source
J Health Econ. 1999 Aug;18(4):393-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
A L Bretteville-Jensen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. alb@sifa.no
Source
J Health Econ. 1999 Aug;18(4):393-407
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Choice Behavior
Health Behavior
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Mental Disorders - complications
Models, Econometric
Norway
Questionnaires
Research Design
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - economics - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
In 1988, Becker and Murphy [Becker, G.S., Murphy, K.M., 1988. A theory of rational addiction. Journal of Political Economy, 96, 675-700.] launched a theory in which they proposed that the perspective of rational decision-making could be applied also to cases of addictive behaviour. This paper discusses the theory's assumptions of interpersonal variation and stability in time preferences on the basis of estimates derived from three groups of people with different consumption levels of illegal intoxicants. We find that active injectors of heroin and amphetamine have a higher discount rate than a group reporting that they have never used the substances. Of greater interest, though not in accordance with Becker and Murphy's assumption of stability, we also find that the discount rate among active and former users differs significantly. These findings raise the question of whether a high time-preference rate leads to addiction or whether the onset of an addiction itself alters people's inter-temporal equilibrium.
PubMed ID
10539613 View in PubMed
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Adolescents initiating cannabis use: cultural opposition or poor mental health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73712
Source
J Adolesc. 1990 Dec;13(4):327-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
W. Pedersen
Source
J Adolesc. 1990 Dec;13(4):327-39
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Attitude
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - etiology
Mental Disorders - complications
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In Norway, the use of cannabis was introduced by a resourceful group of oppositional middle-class adolescents in the late 1960s. At the beginning of the 1970s there were, however, signs of a change in the recruitment of the users: youths in trouble from lower social levels gradually started to use the drug. In a prospective longitudinal study of 1311 Norwegian pupils aged 13-19, the possible links between normative and political opposition, mental health and the use of cannabis were investigated. The findings indicate that the group that experiments with cannabis, and use the drugs a few times, is still mainly characterized by a political and normative "oppositional" engagement. Heavy users of cannabis, however, also have family problems and suffer from poor mental health. Thus, the study draws attention to the importance of distinguishing between two different clusters of longitudinal predictors for adolescent cannabis use: the first consists of subcultural opposition and certain personality traits, and seems to predict the earlier stages of use. The second consists of psychosocial problems and poor mental health. From this study one may not conclude that this second cluster predicts heavy cannabis involvement. We have, however, shown that it correlates with heavy involvement, cross-sectionally.
PubMed ID
2074287 View in PubMed
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Adults' use of health services in the year before death by suicide in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129450
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Sep;22(3):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kenneth B Morrison
Lory Laing
Author Affiliation
Alberta Children and Youth Services, Edmonton, Alberta, T5K 2N2. ken.morrison@gov.ab.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2011 Sep;22(3):15-22
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Insurance Claim Review - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The suicide rate in Alberta is consistently above the Canadian average. Health care use profiles of those who die by suicide in Alberta are currently unknown.
Death records were selected for people aged 25 to 64 with suicide coded as the underlying cause of death from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2006. The death records were linked to administrative records pertaining to physician visits, emergency department visits, inpatient hospital separations, and community mental health visits. The control group was the Alberta population aged 25 to 64 who did not die by suicide. Frequency estimates were produced to determine the characteristics of the study population. Odds ratios relating to demographics, exposure to health care services, and case-control status were estimated with logistic regression.
Almost 90% of suicides had a health service in the year before their death. Suicides averaged 16.6 visits per person, compared with 7.7 visits for non-suicides. Much of the health service use among people who died by suicide appears to have been driven by mental disorders.
Information about health service delivery to those who die by suicide can guide prevention and intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
22106785 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse in Russian delinquent adolescents. Associations with comorbid psychopathology, personality and parenting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174165
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;14(5):254-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Roman A Koposov
Vladislav V Ruchkin
Martin Eisemann
Pavel I Sidorov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology and Psychiatry, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia. rkoposov@arh.ru
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;14(5):254-61
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology - etiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Exploratory Behavior
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Parenting
Personality
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
Adolescent delinquency and alcohol abuse have become a growing concern in Russia. Psychopathology, a dysfunctional family and specific personality factors have all been linked to addictive and antisocial behavior. Since delinquent youth represent a specific risk group, where alcohol misuse tends to be more pronounced than in the general population, the objectives of this study were: 1) to compare differences in personality and parenting factors, and in psychopathology in juvenile delinquents with and without alcohol abuse; and 2) to evaluate the associations between alcohol abuse, personality and parenting factors, after controlling for comorbid psychopathology.
Psychopathology, including alcohol abuse, was assessed by means of a psychiatric interview in 229 Russian incarcerated male juvenile delinquents. In addition, alcohol use, personality, and parenting factors were assessed by self-reports.
Alcohol-abusing delinquents (n=138) scored significantly higher on novelty seeking and maternal emotional warmth and reported higher levels of psychopathology, as compared to nonalcohol-abusing delinquents (n=91). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that personality and parenting factors were significantly related to alcohol abuse, even after controlling for comorbid psychopathology.
Alcohol-abusing delinquents are at risk for a wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Alcohol abuse is associated with personality and parenting factors independently of comorbid psychopathology. Early interventions with high-risk youths may help to reduce their psychiatric problems and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
15981137 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling among psychiatric outpatients: a 1-year prevalence study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114803
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christina Nehlin
Leif Grönbladh
Anders Fredriksson
Lennart Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry Unit, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. christina.nehlin.gordh@neuro.uu
Source
Subst Abus. 2013;34(2):162-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gambling - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Outpatients - psychology
Prevalence
Sex Characteristics
Smoking - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies of alcohol habits in general psychiatric populations are scarce. The objective was to investigate alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling in a clinical sample of psychiatric outpatients. A further aim was to study age and gender differences in the rates of these habits.
Data were collected among psychiatric outpatients with mainly mood (47%) and anxiety (35%) disorders. A questionnaire package was distributed, including AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), DUDIT (Drug Use Disorders Identification Test), tobacco items, and gambling items. Two major drinking categories were formed: "Nonhazardous alcohol use" (NH) and "Alcohol use above hazardous levels" (AH).
In total, 2160 patients (65% females) responded to the questionnaire package. The AH rate was high among psychiatric outpatients (28.4%), particularly among young females (46.6%). Young female patients also reported a high prevalence of problematic drug use (13.8%). Problematic drug use, daily smoking, and problematic gambling were frequent. The unhealthy habits were linked to AH.
Alcohol and drug use, smoking, and gambling are all highly prevalent among psychiatric outpatients. Young females are in particular need of attention. Interventions should be tailored for co-occurring psychiatric disorders and applied within routine psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
23577911 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, clinical findings and retrospective psycho social data in a random sample of men in suburban Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12446
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):185-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
S. Mützell
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 Sep;6(3):185-92
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Crime
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Random Allocation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
A sample of 200 men from the general population of suburban Stockholm was investigated regarding alcohol consumption, with the aim of studying psychosocial factors in relation to consumption. Three symptoms related to heavy drinking were studied: (1) Inability to cut down or stop drinking, referred to here as subjective, relative loss of control over drinking; (2) morning shakes and malaise relieved by drinking, termed morning drinks; and (3) amnesia induced by alcohol, referred to as blackouts. The subjects were divided into three groups: (I) 41 men with low alcohol consumption without any symptom of alcoholism, (II) 106 men with low, moderate or high alcohol consumption with different numbers of such symptoms and (III) 53 heavy-drinking men with two or three symptoms. There was a higher frequency of psycho-somatic problems in group III (51%) (p less than 0.01) than in group I (22%). The children of group III had greater problems at school. Group III had more often been judged guilty of crimes (26%) (p less than 0.01) than groups II (12%) and I (5%). Group III had a significantly higher frequency of nervous problems (61%) than the other groups, and 8% of group III had been in-patients at a clinic for treatment of alcoholics.
PubMed ID
3222589 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and psychiatric disorder: some further data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249729
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 1977 Aug;131:221-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1977

340 records – page 1 of 34.