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Prevalence of mental disorders in a Canadian household population with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143824
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Mar;37(2):186-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Alice Nabalamba
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Health Statistics Division (AN), Ottawa, Ontario. nabalamb@yahoo.com
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Mar;37(2):186-94
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Medical and mental health comorbidity in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias presents difficult challenges for health service delivery. However, existing studies have been conducted in clinical samples and may not be informative for planning community services. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) provides an opportunity to characterize associations between dementias and mental and physical comorbidity in a household population aged 55 and over.
Data were obtained from the 2005 CCHS-cycle 3.1. Weighted estimates for mood and anxiety disorders and other characteristics in Canadian population with dementia were calculated and were compared to those in people without the condition.
According to the CCHS, the prevalence of Alzheimer' s disease and other dementia increases with age, more or less doubling every decade. The increase among women is monotonic, whereas among men in the household population the rate of dementia peaks at age 85-89 and falls thereafter. Mood and anxiety disorders were found to be substantially more frequent among people with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia compared to those without the disease (mood disorders: 19.5% vs. 5.3% and anxiety disorders: 16.3% vs. 4.0%). Heart disease, stroke and obesity were associated with dementia as was a lower level of education. Furthermore, people with dementia were more likely than those without the disease to report activity restrictions.
The high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in household population with Alzheimer's disease and other dementia demonstrates the burden of disease that is likely to worsen quality of life over time.
PubMed ID
20437928 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with mental retardation and active epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34671
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):904-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
S. Steffenburg
C. Gillberg
U. Steffenburg
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Arch Neurol. 1996 Sep;53(9):904-12
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Autistic Disorder - epidemiology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Disabled Persons
Epilepsy - complications - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - complications - epidemiology
Mental Retardation - complications - psychology
Morbidity
Motor Activity
Movement Disorders - epidemiology
Neuropsychological Tests
Patient Selection
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and types of psychiatric disorders in a representative sample of school-age children with the combination of mental retardation (MR) and active epilepsy. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ninety-eight children were identified with MR and active epilepsy in a population-based study from Göteborg, Sweden, which has a general population at risk of 48873 children. They were born between 1975 and 1986 and were 8 to 16 years old at the time of psychiatric examination. Five children had died, 3 had parents who declined participation, and 90 were clinically examined. RESULTS: Fifty-three children (59%) had at least 1 psychiatric diagnosis, and the conditions in 30 (33%) could not be classified because of profound severe MR. Twenty-four children (27%) had autistic disorder, and another 10 (11%) had an autisticlike condition. The combination of MR, active epilepsy, and autism or an autisticlike condition occurred at a rate of 0.07% in the general population. The most common seizure types in the group with autism or an autisiclike condition were complex partial, atypical absence, myoclonic, and tonic-clonic. CONCLUSIONS: Children with MR and active epilepsy suffered from a psychiatric disorder in a majority of those cases in which the children had enough skills and mobility to exhibit behavioral and emotional problems. Many such problems had been undiagnosed despite parental concern and the conviction that the psychiatric problems were the most burdensome in many cases. Neurologists and psychiatrists need to develop better programs for the adequate management of psychiatric disorders in this population.
PubMed ID
8815856 View in PubMed
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Sex differences in risk factors for suicide after attempted suicide-a follow-up study of 1052 suicide attempters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45826
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;39(2):113-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Katarina Skogman
Margot Alsén
Agneta Ojehagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, 22185, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2004 Feb;39(2):113-20
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - classification - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
AIM: This study aims to investigate suicide risk factors after attempted suicide and whether and how these risk factors differ between the sexes. METHOD: A total of 1052 suicide attempters admitted to the Medical Emergency Inpatient Unit, Lund University Hospital, Sweden were followed up concerning suicide and death from other causes after a median period of 6 years and 5 months. In all, 50 persons committed suicide during follow-up. At the index suicide attempt, socio-demographic data and information about clinical characteristics were gathered in a standardised manner. Risk factors were identified among these data using survival analyses for the whole sample and for each sex separately. RESULT: Men had a higher frequency of suicide and a greater overall mortality than women. Cox regressions showed that suicide attempt(s) prior to the index attempt and the use of a violent method for the index attempt were risk factors for men only, whereas older age and a high suicidal intent (Beck SIS score) were female ones. Major depression was a risk factor for both sexes. CONCLUSION: More attention probably needs to be paid to the importance of gender in assessment of suicide risk and treatment of suicide attempters.
PubMed ID
15052392 View in PubMed
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