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A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Feb;42(4):495-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
E J Sobo
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, England.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Feb;42(4):495-508
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Induced
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Jamaica
Medicine, Traditional
Menstruation-Inducing Agents
Pregnancy
Rural Population
Social Values
Witchcraft
Abstract
Abortion is not condoned in Jamaica. Its meaning is linked to the meanings of kinship and parenthood, which are expressed through procreation and involve altruism and the assumption of responsibility for the well-being of others. Abortion subverts these ideals but indigenous methods for it are known and are secretly used. The inconsistencies between abortion talk and abortion practice are examined, and the structural functions of abortion (and of its culturally constructed, ideological meaning) are discussed. The distinction--and the overlap--between abortion as such and menstrual regulation is explored. The use of the culturally constructed 'witchcraft baby' syndrome to justify abortion is also investigated. Traditional abortion techniques follow from (and can illuminate) general health practices, which focus on inducing the ejection of 'blockages' and toxins, and from ethnophysiological beliefs about procreation and reproductive health, which easily allow for menstrual delays not caused by conception. The latter understanding and the similarity between abortifacients, emmenagogues and general purgatives allows women flexibility in interpreting the meanings of their missed periods and the physical effects of the remedy.
PubMed ID
8643976 View in PubMed
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"A challenge" - healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277305
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Hanna Grundström
Preben Kjølhede
Carina Berterö
Siw Alehagen
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Dysmenorrhea - diagnosis - etiology
Dyspareunia - diagnosis - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - diagnosis
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Menstruation
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Ovulation
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Physicians
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.
Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.
Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as "normal" menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.
PubMed ID
26826048 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture with manual and low frequency electrical stimulation as experienced by women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125543
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Annika Billhult
Elisabet Stener-Victorin
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit of the County Södra Älvsborg, Sven Eriksonsplatsen 4, 503 38 Borås, Sweden. annika.billhult@vgregion.se
Source
BMC Complement Altern Med. 2012;12:32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - methods - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Electric Stimulation - methods
Electroacupuncture - methods - psychology
Emotions
Female
Humans
Hyperandrogenism - therapy
Interviews as Topic
Menstruation
Ovulation
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - psychology - therapy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10 percent of all fertile women and is associated with anovulation/oligoovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. Pharmacological treatment is often effective but associated with unwanted side effects. Acupuncture treatments have been shown to improve menstrual bleeding patterns and ovulation as well as hyperandrogenism, without side effects. The purpose of the present study was to describe the experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS.
Eight women with PCOS living in western Sweden, were interviewed following repeated acupuncture treatments. Data was analyzed using systematic text condensation as described by Malterud.
The experience of acupuncture for women diagnosed with PCOS can be described in five categories; the experience of hope, getting results, feelings of responsibility, skepticism and proof of effect, and feeling normal.
Since acupuncture is a promising treatment for the symptoms of the common syndrome PCOS, the present study adds to the knowledge base by providing the important experiences of patients receiving the treatment. Acupuncture provides a possibility for patients to gain hope as the treatment shows results. The results show that acupuncture empowers the patients to take responsibility for their future well-being, although they may have been initially skeptical to the treatment. Because the syndrome had affected them for some time, even small changes offered a chance for them to feel that their bodies were capable of normal function.
Notes
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Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 May;32(5):453-920500954
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Cites: Hum Reprod. 2010 Feb;25(2):450-619933236
Cites: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2009 Sep;33(3):382-41119597976
PubMed ID
22471422 View in PubMed
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Adherence of Escherichia coli to human urinary tract epithelial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247164
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1979
Author
A J Schaeffer
S K Amundsen
L N Schmidt
Source
Infect Immun. 1979 Jun;24(3):753-9
Date
Jun-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture Media
Epithelial Cells
Escherichia coli - drug effects - physiology
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Mannose - pharmacology
Menstruation
Species Specificity
Temperature
Urinary Tract - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
The adherence of Escherichia coli to human uroepithelial cells obtained from midstream urine specimens of healthy women was studied. Bacteria labeled with [(3)H]uridine were used, and unattached organisms were separated from the epithelial cells by vacuum filtration with 5-mum-pore-size Nucleopore membrane filters. These techniques allowed adherence to be measured in large numbers of epithelial cells and overcame the problem of distinguishing experimental bacteria from the indigenous organisms present on uroepithelial cells. Adherence was not appreciably affected by temperature. Adherence was maximal at pH 4 to 5 and at bacterial-to-epithelial-cell ratios of 5,000 or more. The latter observation suggested that there are a limited number of receptors on the epithelial cell surface, an idea which was supported by competition experiments. Adherence occurred within 1 min and then decreased gradually or quickly, depending on the type of bacterial growth medium, to a stationary level of adherence, approximately 50% of that observed initially. The ability of epithelial cells from a single individual to bind E. coli varied in a cyclical and repetitive pattern. Adherence tended to be higher during the early phase of the menstrual cycle and diminished shortly after the time of expected ovulation; adherence frequently correlated with the value obtained on the same day of the menstrual cycle during the preceding months. Adherence was markedly enhanced by bacterial incubation in broth for 72 h and inhibited by alpha-d-mannose. These results suggest that adherence is a complex phenomenon perhaps mediated in part by bacterial pili and mannose residues on uroepithelial cells.
Notes
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Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1977 Mar;33(3):556-6216345207
PubMed ID
38207 View in PubMed
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The Adolescent Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire, Part II: Normative scores.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222037
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1993 Jan-Feb;14(1):63-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
J M Morse
D. Kieren
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1993 Jan-Feb;14(1):63-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Menstruation - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Reference Values
Abstract
Results obtained from administering the Adolescent Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire to 860 pre- and 1,013 postmenarcheal girls from 49 randomly selected schools in a large western Canadian city are reported. Scores obtained for both the pre- and the postmenarcheal versions of the total scale and the subscales are presented by age and by grade. In addition, for postmenarcheal girls, the self-report of menstrual symptoms gives insight into the prevalence of symptoms and the perception of symptom severity. Correlations between self-reported symptoms with the Menstrual Symptoms subscale score and the total scale score add validity to the scale. These data may be used by clinicians for comparison when administering the scale to individuals or to groups.
PubMed ID
8454526 View in PubMed
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Source
Bibl Laeger. 1964;156:109-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1964
Author
K. BOJLEN
M W BENTZON
Source
Bibl Laeger. 1964;156:109-43
Date
1964
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Canada
Child
Greenland
Inuits
Menstruation
Statistics
PubMed ID
14304675 View in PubMed
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Source
ORGYN. 1995;(4):2-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M. Rees
Source
ORGYN. 1995;(4):2-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Demography
Menarche
Menstruation
Population
Population Characteristics
Reproduction
Abstract
In females, the first menstrual period, menarche, signals the beginning of the capacity to reproduce and is associated with the development of secondary sexual characteristics. Menarche is one of the most significant milestones in a woman's life. The first cycles tend to be anovulatory and vary widely in length. They are usually painless and occur without warning. Menarche occurs between the ages of 10 and 16 years in most girls in developed countries. Although the precise determinants of menarcheal age remain to be understood, genetic influences, socioeconomic conditions, general health and well-being, nutritional status, certain types of exercise, seasonality, and family size possibly play a role. Over the past century the age at menarche has fallen in industrialized countries, but that trend has stopped and may even be reversing. The average age at menarche in 1840 was 16.5 years, now it is 13. The age at menopause, however, has remained relatively constant at approximately 50 years. The length of time during which women are exposed to endogenous estrogen has therefore been increasing. Reasons for the fall in menarcheal age remain unclear, but one interpretation considers it to be a reflection of the improvement in health and environmental conditions. The decline in menarcheal age appears to be leveling off in many countries such as Britain, Iceland, Italy, Poland, and Sweden, but continues in Germany and some other countries. Late menarche is associated with a decreased risk of developing breast cancer in later life, a decreased frequency of coronary heart disease, later first pregnancy, and reduction in teen pregnancy. Late menarche may, however, be positively associated with the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
PubMed ID
12319855 View in PubMed
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[Age-related features and possibilities of prognostication of the development of the reproductive system in girls living in the Amur Region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37043
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1991 Sep;(9):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
O G Putintseva
V I Marushchenko
L V Maslova
Z N Zharikova
Source
Akush Ginekol (Mosk). 1991 Sep;(9):26-9
Date
Sep-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Exertion
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - etiology
Growth
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances - etiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Prognosis
Puberty
Reproduction
Risk factors
Siberia
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Physical and genital status of 2473 girls aged 12-16 was studied and factors of risk of development of the reproductive system in puberty detected. A scale for individual prediction of the reproductive function development, based on the girls' health status, body mass, exercise, was derived.
PubMed ID
1746692 View in PubMed
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320 records – page 1 of 32.