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Characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis isolates causing fatal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90787
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(9):734-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Jacobsson Susanne
Olcén Per
Löfdahl Margareta
Fredlund Hans
Mölling Paula
Author Affiliation
National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. susanne.jacobsson@orebroll.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(9):734-44
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Population Surveillance
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serotyping
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were to describe a selection of characteristics of all available fatal meningococcal isolates (n = 62) and to compare these with all the other invasive isolates (non-fatal, n = 474) collected in Sweden from 1995 to 2004 (fatality rate of 12%). The coverage of the fatal isolates by presently discussed outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines was also estimated. The isolates were characterized by serogroup, serotype, genosubtype, multilocus sequence type and antibiogram. Basic epidemiological data were gathered. The results of the fatal isolates showed 55% serogroup B, 27% C, 15% Yand 3% W-135, with a fatality rate of 11% for B, 12% for C, 17% for Y and 8% for W-135. Characteristics associated with higher mortality were age, gender, serogroup Y, serotype 14 and 15 and genosubtypes P1.7,16-29,35 and P1.5-1,10-4,36-2. In contrast, non-14/non-15 serotypes, the genosubtypes P1.5-1,10-8,36-2; P1.7-2,4,37 and P1.7,16,35, as well as reduced sensitivity for penicillin G were associated with decreased mortality. The presently discussed OMV vaccines could, based solely on the complete genosubtype, theoretically cover up to 44% of the fatal serogroup B cases and up to 100% if every variable region by itself is capable to induce protective immunity.
PubMed ID
19086340 View in PubMed
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The epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Norway 1975-91.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36956
Source
NIPH Ann. 1991 Dec;14(2):57-65; discussion 65-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
A. Lystad
S. Aasen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Control, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo.
Source
NIPH Ann. 1991 Dec;14(2):57-65; discussion 65-6
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Residence Characteristics
Seasons
Serotyping
Sex Factors
Abstract
The epidemiology of meningococcal disease (MCd) in Norway is described on the basis of official notification figures for 1975-91. Morbidity is presented by serogroup of the isolated Neisseria meningitidis strain, time of onset of the disease in addition to the place of living, age and sex of the patient. A long-term group B epidemic with high incidence and case fatality rates in the age groups below 5 years and between 13 and 19-20 years is the main characteristics of the situation.
PubMed ID
1812437 View in PubMed
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Serotype-specific outbreak of group B meningococcal disease in Iquique, Chile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37609
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1990 Aug;105(1):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
C. Cruz
G. Pavez
E. Aguilar
L. Grawe
J. Cam
F. Mendez
J. Garcia
S. Ruiz
P. Vicent
I. Canepa
Author Affiliation
Iquique Health Service, Chile.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1990 Aug;105(1):119-26
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Chile - epidemiology
Climate
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification
Prognosis
Seasons
Septicemia - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Serotyping
Urban Population
Abstract
From 1979 to August 1987, there have been 178 cases of meningococcal disease in Iquique, Chile, a city of about 140,000. The attack rate for the last 5 years has been in excess of 20/100,000 per year, more than 20 times greater than for the country overall. The mortality rate was 6%. The disease occurred in patients with ages from 4 months to 60 years, but 89% of cases were in patients less than 21 years. The largest number of cases were in the age group 5-9 years (n = 54), but the highest incidence occurred in children less than 1 year of age (72.8/100,000 per year). The male/female ratio was 1.2. Cases occurred all year round with little seasonal variation. Of the 178 cases, 173 were biologically confirmed. Serogroup analysis of strains from 135 patients revealed A = 1, B = 124, C = 10. Forty-four group B strains from 1985-7 were serotyped: 15:P1.3 = 36, 15:NT = 4, 4:P1.3 = 2, NT:NT = 2. Ten of 11 of the outbreak strains tested were sulfadiazine-resistant. This is the first recognized outbreak caused by a Gp B:15 strain in South America. It shares many of the characteristics of outbreaks caused by closely related strains in Europe, such as a predilection for older children and adolescents, sulfadiazine-resistance, and sustained high attack rates. The Iquique strain (B:15:P1.3) belongs to the same genetic clone (ET-5 complex) as the Norway (B:15:P1.16) and the Cuban (B:4:P1.15) strains.
PubMed ID
2116973 View in PubMed
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