Skip header and navigation

Refine By

76 records – page 1 of 8.

Absolute versus relative ascertainment of pedophilia in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147471
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Ray Blanchard
Michael E Kuban
Thomas Blak
James M Cantor
Philip E Klassen
Robert Dickey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Ray_Blanchard@camh.net
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):431-41
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Audiovisual Aids
Child
Choice Behavior
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Forensic Psychiatry - methods
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Ontario
Pedophilia - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Penile Erection - physiology - psychology
Plethysmography - methods - standards
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Psychophysiology - methods - standards
Referral and Consultation
Tape Recording
Abstract
There are at least two different criteria for assessing pedophilia in men: absolute ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is intense) and relative ascertainment (their sexual interest in children is greater than their interest in adults). The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition (DSM-III) used relative ascertainment in its diagnostic criteria for pedophilia; this was abandoned and replaced by absolute ascertainment in the DSM-III-R and all subsequent editions. The present study was conducted to demonstrate the continuing need for relative ascertainment, particularly in the laboratory assessment of pedophilia. A total of 402 heterosexual men were selected from a database of patients referred to a specialty clinic. These had undergone phallometric testing, a psychophysiological procedure in which their penile blood volume was monitored while they were presented with a standardized set of laboratory stimuli depicting male and female children, pubescents, and adults.The 130 men selected for the Teleiophilic Profile group responded substantially to prepubescent girls but even more to adult women; the 272 men selected for the Pedophilic Profile group responded weakly to prepubescent girls but even less to adult women. In terms of absolute magnitude, every patient in the Pedophilic Profile group had a lesser penile response to prepubescent girls than every patient in the Teleiophilic Profile group. Nevertheless, the Pedophilic Profile group had a significantly greater number of known sexual offenses against prepubescent girls, indicating that they contained a higher proportion of true pedophiles. These results dramatically demonstrate the utility-or perhaps necessity-of relative ascertainment in the laboratory assessment of erotic age-preference.
PubMed ID
19901237 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and sexual function in Canadian East Asian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166675
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Lori A Brotto
Jane S T Woo
Andrew G Ryder
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Obstetrics/Gynaecology, Vancouver, BC, Canada. lori.brotto@vch.ca
Source
J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):72-82
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Asian Americans - psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Social Values - ethnology
Students - psychology
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of considering acculturation when investigating the sexuality of East Asian women in North America. Moreover, bidimensional assessment of both heritage and mainstream cultural affiliations provides significantly more information about sexual attitudes than simple unidimensional measures, such as length of residency in the Western culture.
The goal of this study was to extend the findings in women to a sample of East Asian men.
Self-report measures of sexual behaviors, sexual responses, and sexual satisfaction.
Euro-Canadian (N = 124) and East Asian (N = 137) male university students privately completed a battery of questionnaires in exchange for course credit. Results. Group comparisons revealed East Asian men to have significantly lower liberal sexual attitudes and experiences, and a significantly lower proportion had engaged in sexual intercourse compared with the Euro-Canadian sample. In addition, the East Asian men had significantly higher Impotence and Avoidance subscale scores on the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction, a measure of sexual dysfunction. Focusing on East Asian men alone, mainstream acculturation, but not length of residency in Canada, was significantly related to sexual attitudes, experiences, and responses.
Overall, these data replicate the findings in women and suggest that specific acculturation effects over and above length of residency should be included in the cultural assessment of men's sexual health.
PubMed ID
17087799 View in PubMed
Less detail

Always one step behind: husbands' narratives about taking care of their demented wives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180713
Source
Health (London). 2004 Apr;8(2):159-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Tapio Kirsi
Antti Hervonen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Finland. tapio.kirsi@uta.fi
Source
Health (London). 2004 Apr;8(2):159-81
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - nursing
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men - psychology
Narration
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
Based on an analysis of extracts from 11 free-form written texts and 13 focused interviews with Finnish husbands who had given care to their demented wives, this study was aimed at finding out how husbands signify their action as spousal caregivers. The data were approached qualitatively from a social constructionistic point of view. Husbands' written material described their action of caregiving mainly in a passive voice that echoed duty and responsive agency. Analysis of the interview talk revealed a wider spectrum of voices and more agentive talk about caregiving. The results of the study challenge interpretations of men as either ineffective or capable caregivers and highlight, instead, the contextual nature of the way that men construct their agencies, depending upon the purposes and audiences of their narration.
PubMed ID
15068635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambivalence--a logical response to legal abortion: a prospective study among women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63901
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2000 Jun;21(2):81-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
A. Kero
A. Lalos
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2000 Jun;21(2):81-91
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology
Adult
Attitude to Health
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making
Ethics
Female
Guilt
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to elucidate ambivalence in relation to legal abortion by studying emotions, attitudes, motives for abortion and ethical reasoning in a strategic sample of women and men who, 1 year after abortion, expressed both positive and painful feelings in relation to the abortion. The study shows that social perspectives legitimate the decision to have an abortion whilst ethical perspectives complicate the decision. Nearly all women and men described having the abortion as an expression of responsibility. Almost one-half also had parallel feelings of guilt, as they regarded the abortion as a violation of their ethical values. The majority of the sample expressed relief while simultaneously experiencing the termination of the pregnancy as a loss coupled with feelings of grief/emptiness. In spite of the ambivalence, only one woman regretted the abortion. For the vast majority, the impact of the abortion had led to increased maturity and deepened self-knowledge. Thus, ambivalence might be regarded not only as problematic but also as indicating openness to the complexity of the abortion issue. Since incompatible values clash in connection with abortion, experiences of ambivalence become both logical and understandable.
PubMed ID
10994180 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1990 May;15(1):134-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
C. Perrault
Source
Sante Ment Que. 1990 May;15(1):134-44
Date
May-1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Divorce - psychology
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Abstract
This article raises questions about some of the perverse effects of the reasoning behind correlations between sex and health in our socio-cultural context. Such a reasoning strongly denounces the psychosocial problems of women, but tends to forget the vulnerability of men which is nonetheless clearly evident in official statistics on suicide, dependence on alcohol and other drugs, violence and itinerancy.
PubMed ID
2096966 View in PubMed
Less detail

Balancing personal and family trajectories: an international study of dual-earner couples with pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186070
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):401-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Wendy A Hall
Peter Callery
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, School of Nursing, T 201 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 2B5. hall@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2003 May;40(4):401-12
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Cultural Comparison
England
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Men - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Parenting - psychology
Social Support
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
In general, the nursing literature neglects healthy families and depictions of families are dominated by systems and developmental theory. The preponderance of dual-earner families has changed the meaning of family, however, nurses have given minimal attention to how women and men attend to work and home. Balancing personal and family trajectories is a substantive theory that accounts for how Canadian and English couples with pre-school children managed work and family life. The theory describes their efforts to maximize personal and family development, by using processes that attempted to support and sustain individual and family health, happiness, and fulfillment.
PubMed ID
12667517 View in PubMed
Less detail

'Brothers in arms': how men with cancer experience a sense of comradeship through group intervention which combines physical activity with information relay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19324
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Jul;10(4):528-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
L. Adamsen
J M Rasmussen
L S Pedersen
Author Affiliation
UCSF, The University Hospital Centre for Nursing and Care Research, Copenhagen, Denmark. ucsf@ucsf.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Jul;10(4):528-37
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Exercise Therapy - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Group Processes
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncologic Nursing
Patient Education - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Social Support
Abstract
The study investigated how a group intervention programme (13 sessions over 16 weeks), designed for men with cancer (n = 17), affected their sense of well-being and had a positive impact on their ability to cope with the physical, psychological and social consequences of living with cancer. The close-knit relationships fostered between participants stimulated a sense of solidarity and commitment amongst them. New thinking in relation to gender, group dynamics and social processes is presented, as are the implications for clinical nursing practice in cancer care. The experience from male orientated group intervention programmes shows that men with cancer have undiscovered strengths, whilst some wish to die 'with their boots on'.
PubMed ID
11822501 View in PubMed
Less detail

Careers in health care management, Part 2: Experiences, attitudes and definitions of success.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216720
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1994;7(4):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

[Childbirth preparation course and men's role. What significance does a childbirth preparation course have for men?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65735
Source
Vard Nord Utveckl Forsk. 1983;3(5):142-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983

Comparing gender awareness in Dutch and Swedish first-year medical students--results from a questionaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128054
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jenny Andersson
Petra Verdonk
Eva E Johansson
Toine Lagro-Janssen
Katarina Hamberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. jenny.andersson@fammed.umu.se
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:3
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Awareness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Men - psychology
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Women - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To ascertain good and appropriate healthcare for both women and men implementation of gender perspectives in medical education is needed. For a successful implementation, knowledge about students' attitudes and beliefs about men, women, and gender is crucial. The aim of this study was to compare attitudes to gender and gender stereotyping among Dutch and Swedish male and female medical students.
In this cross-sectional study, we measured the attitudes and assumptions about gender among 1096 first year medical students (616 Dutch and 480 Swedish) with the validated Nijmegen Gender Awareness in Medicine Scale (N-GAMS). The response rate was 94% in the Netherlands and 93% in Sweden. Univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the scores between Dutch and Swedish male and female students. Linear regressions were used to analyze the importance of the background variables.
There were significant differences in attitudes to gender between Dutch and Swedish students. The Swedish students expressed less stereotypical thinking about patients and doctors and the Dutch were more sensitive to gender differences. The students' sex mattered for gender stereotyping, with male students in both countries agreeing more with stereotypical statements. Students' age, father's birth country and mother's education level had some impact on the outcome.
There are differences between cultures as well as between men and women in gender awareness that need to be considered when implementing gender in medical education.This study suggests that to arouse the students' interest in gender issues and make them aware of the significance of gender in medical work, the examples used in discussions need to be relevant and challenging in the context of the specific country. Due to different levels of knowledge and different attitudes within the student population it is important to create a climate for dialogue where students feel permitted to disclose their ideas and attitudes in order to become aware of what these are as well as their possible consequences on interaction and decision-making in medical work.
Notes
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2000 Nov;79(5):763-7511079240
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2009;10:5619671133
Cites: J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 2002 Sep;11(7):653-6612396897
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2002 Dec;48(3):217-2412477606
Cites: Women Health. 2003;37(4):67-8712956215
Cites: Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 4;100(49):4084-5, 4088-9014717073
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1983 Jun;16(6):1117-216854242
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Jan 31;113(4):490-816449728
Cites: Health Psychol. 2006 May;25(3):255-6616719596
Cites: Med Teach. 2007 Feb;29(1):e1-817538822
Cites: Med Teach. 2006 Nov;28(7):635-4117594556
Cites: Womens Health (Lond Engl). 2008 May;4(3):237-4319072473
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Nov;73(2):300-618640806
Cites: Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2009 Mar;14(1):135-5218274877
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Sep;187(3 Suppl):S22-412235434
PubMed ID
22239742 View in PubMed
Less detail

76 records – page 1 of 8.