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Effect of ageing and caloric restriction on specific markers of protein oxidative damage and membrane peroxidizability in rat liver mitochondria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61527
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2004 Aug;125(8):529-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Adrian J Lambert
Manuel Portero-Otin
Reinald Pamplona
Brian J Merry
Author Affiliation
School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK. adrian.lambert@mrcc-dunn.cam.ac.uk
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 2004 Aug;125(8):529-38
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blotting, Western
Energy Intake - physiology
Fatty Acids - metabolism
Glutamic Acid - metabolism
Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - metabolism
Lipid Peroxides - metabolism
Male
Mass Fragmentography
Membrane Lipids - chemistry
Mitochondria, Liver - metabolism
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Proteins - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To gain insight into the anti-ageing mechanisms of caloric restriction (CR), liver mitochondria were isolated from male Brown-Norway rats of different ages (fully fed control and CR) and various specific markers of non-enzymatic protein modification (by oxidative, glyco- and lipoxidative-reactions) were measured by GC/MS and Western blotting. A membrane peroxidizability index (PI) was calculated from the fatty acid profiles. Between 6 and 18 months of age, there were significant decreases in the concentration of all markers of damage in mitochondria from both the fully fed and CR groups. In contrast, between the ages of 18 and 28 months, there were significant increases in the concentrations of all markers of damage. In mitochondria from both fully fed and CR groups, there were significant increases in N-epsilon (Nepsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N-epsilon-(malondialdehyde)lysine (MDAL) between 6 and 28 months of age. In general, damage tended to be lower in mitochondria from CR animals, but the effects were not significant, except for the concentration of N-epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine at 28 months of age. PI increased steadily and significantly with age in fully fed animals, whilst CR induced a significant decrease in this index at 28 months of age. It is concluded that for male rats of the Brown-Norway strain, and mitochondria from liver (i) old (but not mature) age is associated with an increased membrane PI and protein oxidative damage and (ii) CR does not lead to a general reversion in age-related protein damage, but it does prevent the age-induced increase in PI very late in life.
PubMed ID
15336910 View in PubMed
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Effects of membranotropic agents on mono- and multilayer structures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45945
Source
Eur Biophys J. 2002 Dec;31(7):554-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
L N Lisetski
O V Vashchenko
A V Tolmachev
K B Vodolazhskiy
Author Affiliation
Institute for Single Crystals, Ukrainian NAS, 60 Lenin Avenue, 61001 Kharkov, Ukraine. lisetski@isc.kharkov.com
Source
Eur Biophys J. 2002 Dec;31(7):554-8
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
1,2-Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine - chemistry
Alanine - chemistry
Calorimetry, Differential Scanning - methods
Cholesterol - chemistry
Decamethonium Compounds - chemistry
Lipid Bilayers - chemistry
Liposomes - chemistry
Macromolecular Substances
Membrane Fluidity
Membrane Lipids - chemistry
Membranes, Artificial
Molecular Conformation
Stearic Acids - chemistry
Structure-Activity Relationship
Surface Properties
Abstract
We have studied the action of some membranotropic agents (MTAs) on the parameters of mono- and multilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The MTAs used included an antimicrobial drug, decamethoxinum, the model amphiphilic agent stearoyl-L-alpha-alanine, and cholesterol as a reference substance. Using differential scanning calorimetry and the Langmuir monolayer technique, we measured the temperature and enthalpy of the main phase transition of DPPC, the mean molecular area, the collapse pressure and the free energy of the mixed monolayers of DPPC and MTA. A good correlation has been obtained between the structure of the MTA used and changes in the parameters of both mono- and multilayers. Thus, for cholesterol, its well-known condensing effect in the L alpha phase correlates with its behavior in the mixed monolayers. The disturbing action of decamethoxinum (depression of the phase transition in DPPC multilayers and relatively high free energy of mixing in monolayers) is presumably connected with interaction of its charged ammonium moieties with polar phospholipid heads. At the same time, stearoyl-L-alpha- alpha-alanine condensed the lipid layers and increased the melting point of DPPC, owing to its interaction with both polar and non-polar lipid moieties. One can conclude that the three MTAs used can really be considered as representative examples of three different types of behavior in mono- and multilayers.
PubMed ID
12602341 View in PubMed
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[Interaction between 5-lipoxygenase and allosteric effector--sodium dodecyl sulfate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91473
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 May-Jun;80(3):31-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kharytonenko H I
Skaterna T D
Mel'nyk A K
Babii L V
Kharchenko O V
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 May-Jun;80(3):31-9
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allosteric Regulation
Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase - chemistry - isolation & purification
Lipid Peroxidation
Membrane Lipids - chemistry
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - chemistry
Solanum tuberosum - enzymology
Substrate Specificity
Abstract
The role of allosteric effector--sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the lipoxygenase catalysis in micelle system has been studied. The effect of the stable hydrophobic bis-nitroxides, blocking the free radical transformation, on the oxidation of linoleic acid or linoleic alcohol by 5-lipoxygenase from potato tuber has been investigated. The inhibiting effect of nitroxide compounds on oxidation of linoleic acid or linoleic alcohol by 5-lipoxygenase depends on SDS concentration. The inhibition percentage is determined by the substrate nature and presence of allosteric effector. The presence of SDS did not lead to an appreciable change in the pKa values of ionogenic enzyme groups. The effect of SDS and micellar system on thermodynamic parameters for thermoinactivation of 5-lipoxygenase was studied. It was found that thermoinactivation rate constants and activation energy of enzyme thermoinactivation were increased in the presence of SDS. It is suggested that interaction of 5-lipoxygenase and allosteric effector--SDS intensifies the dissociation of radical intermediates from the active site of the enzyme. These findings are of physiological significance in the light of the lipoxygenase involvement in the membrane lipid peroxidation.
PubMed ID
18959025 View in PubMed
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Lipid-induced conformational transition of amyloid beta peptide fragments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143494
Source
J Mol Neurosci. 2010 Jul;41(3):368-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Nagarajan Sureshbabu
R. Kirubagaran
H. Thangarajah
E J Padma Malar
R. Jayakumar
Author Affiliation
Bio-Organic and Neurochemistry Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600020, India.
Source
J Mol Neurosci. 2010 Jul;41(3):368-82
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyloid beta-Peptides - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Kinetics
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - physiology
Mutation - genetics
Peptide Fragments - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Plaque, Amyloid - chemistry - metabolism
Protein Conformation
Protein Folding
Protein Structure, Secondary - genetics - physiology
Static Electricity
Abstract
Conformational transition of soluble monomeric amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) into oligomeric and protofibrillar aggregates plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the central questions surrounding the molecular pathophysiology of AD is how the soluble Abeta is converted into its aggregated toxic form. A more detailed understanding of the conformational transitions involved in the self-assembly of Abeta may facilitate the design of inhibitors of aggregation. In this study, we evaluated the wild-type (WT) Abeta 16-28 peptide (KLVFFAEDVGSNK) and its associated mutants, including A21G (Flemish), E22K (Italian), E22Q (Dutch), and E22G (Arctic) mutants, by examining, in particular, their aggregation kinetics in the presence and in the absence of negatively charged and zwitterionic lipids. Circular dichroic and thioflavin T fluorescence studies indicated that the WT peptide undergoes a rapid conformational transition into beta-sheet structure in solution, whereas the Arctic and Dutch variants show a markedly rapid transition into beta-sheet structure in the presence of negatively charged lipids. These results provide strong evidence suggesting that the reduction in net charge, with a concurrent increase in the net hydrophobicity of the peptide alone or when complexed with lipid in solution, determines the rate of aggregate formation.
PubMed ID
20480256 View in PubMed
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Lipid membrane modulation and pigmentation: A cryoprotection mechanism in Arctic pigmented bacteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291456
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Sep; 57(9):770-780
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Archana Singh
Kottekattu P Krishnan
Dharmar Prabaharan
Rupesh K Sinha
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research, Headland Sada, Vasco-da-Gama, Goa, India.
Source
J Basic Microbiol. 2017 Sep; 57(9):770-780
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Bacteria - cytology - isolation & purification - metabolism
Climate change
Fatty acids
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
Membrane Fluidity
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - metabolism
Pigmentation
Pseudomonas - isolation & purification - metabolism
Rhodococcus - isolation & purification - metabolism
Temperature
Abstract
The present study aims to address the effect of gradual change in temperature (15-4?°C) followed by freeze-thaw on pigmented bacterial strains - Leeuwenhoekiella aequorea, Pseudomonas pelagia, Halomonas boliviensis, Rhodococcus yunnanensis, and Algoriphagus ratkwoskyi, isolated from Kongsfjorden (an Arctic fjord) to understand their survival in present climate change scenario. The total cell count and retrievability of the isolates were not affected despite the variation in temperature. In all the isolates, the saturated fatty acids, particularly stearic and palmitic acid were predominant at higher temperature, while at 4?°C, the unsaturated fatty acids, primarily cis-10-pentadecenoic, palmitoleic, and oleic acid, were major constituents, confirming homeoviscous adaptation. Even after freeze-thaw, the unsaturated fatty acid composition was retained in all the isolates except A. ratkwoskyi. The increase in unsaturated fatty acids was at the expense of their saturated analogs, probably by desaturase activity. The major pigment in the isolates resembled Zeaxanthin, whose concentration was found to be 26-65% higher after freeze-thaw, suggesting its vital role as a cryoprotective agent in regulating membrane fluidity. Such experimental simulations related to freeze-thaw in polar bacterial isolates are helpful in understanding the physiological plasticity adaptations, which could be critical for survival in harsh and rapidly changing polar environments.
PubMed ID
28670715 View in PubMed
Less detail

Membrane adaptation in phospholipids and cholesterol in the widely distributed, freeze-tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262839
Source
J Comp Physiol B. 2014 Apr;184(3):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Alice M Reynolds
Richard E Lee
Jon P Costanzo
Source
J Comp Physiol B. 2014 Apr;184(3):371-83
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Alaska
Animals
Brain - cytology - metabolism
Cell Membrane - chemistry - physiology
Cholesterol - metabolism
Freezing
Liver - cytology - metabolism
Male
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - metabolism
Ohio
Phospholipids - chemistry - metabolism
Ranidae - physiology
Seasons
Abstract
Maintaining proper membrane phase and fluidity is important for preserving membrane structure and function, and by altering membrane lipid composition many organisms can adapt to changing environmental conditions. We compared the phospholipid and cholesterol composition of liver and brain plasma membranes in the freeze-tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica, from southern Ohio and Interior Alaska during summer, fall, and winter. We also compared membranes from winter-acclimatized frogs from Ohio that were either acclimated to 0, 4, or 10 °C, or frozen to -2.5 °C and sampled before or after thawing. Lipids were extracted from isolated membranes, separated by one-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, and analyzed via densitometry. Liver membranes underwent seasonal changes in phospholipid composition and lipid ratios, including a winter increase in phosphatidylethanolamine, which serves to increase fluidity. However, whereas Ohioan frogs decreased phosphatidylcholine and increased sphingomyelin, Alaskan frogs only decreased phosphatidylserine, indicating that these phenotypes use different adaptive strategies to meet the functional needs of their membranes. Liver membranes showed no seasonal variation in cholesterol abundance, though membranes from Alaskan frogs contained relatively less cholesterol, consistent with the need for greater fluidity in a colder environment. No lipid changed seasonally in brain membranes in either population. In the thermal acclimation experiment, cold exposure induced an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine in liver membranes and a decrease in cholesterol in brain membranes. No changes occurred during freezing and thawing in membranes from either organ. Wood frogs use tissue-specific membrane adaptation of phospholipids and cholesterol to respond to changing environmental factors, particularly temperature, though not with freezing.
PubMed ID
24504263 View in PubMed
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[Reorganization of the strain's cellular lipids--degradation of anionic surfactants during "detergent" stress]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10068
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2001 May-Jun;63(3):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S S Stavskaia
I A Krivets
N I Nastoiashchaia
Author Affiliation
National Technical University of Ukraine, Scientific-Research Institute of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases, Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2001 May-Jun;63(3):22-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Detergents - metabolism
English Abstract
Fatty Acids - analysis
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - metabolism
Microscopy, Electron
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects - metabolism - ultrastructure
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate - pharmacology
Surface-Active Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
Changes in the fatty acid composition and ultrastructure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1C strain--a destructor of alkyl sulphates under the effect of the stress evoked by sodium dodecyl-sulphate have been studied. It has been established that the "detergent" stress changes the ratio of the cell fatty acids (FA) towards the increase of their nonsaturation. Ultrastructural changes in the cells are revealed earlier than biochemical ones. Several stages in stress development have been distinguished. The escape from the stress state is performed both at the population level and at the level of individual cells, highly-resistant to dodecyl sulphate.
PubMed ID
11785259 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seasonal acquisition of chill tolerance and restructuring of membrane glycerophospholipids in an overwintering insect: triggering by low temperature, desiccation and diapause progression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80316
Source
J Exp Biol. 2006 Oct;209(Pt 20):4102-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Tomcala A.
Tollarová M.
Overgaard J.
Simek P.
Kostál V.
Author Affiliation
Biology Centre AS CR, Institute of Entomology, Branisovská 31, 370 05 Ceské Budejovice, Czech Republic.
Source
J Exp Biol. 2006 Oct;209(Pt 20):4102-14
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Animals
Body Water - metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cold Climate
Fat Body - metabolism
Glycerophospholipids - chemistry - metabolism
Heteroptera - physiology
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - metabolism
Muscles - metabolism
Seasons
Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Abstract
Adults of the insect Pyrrhocoris apterus acquire chill tolerance through the process of autumnal acclimatization. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to separate the triggering effects of low temperatures, desiccation and diapause progression on the physiological characteristics related to chill tolerance with emphasis on the restructuring of glycerophospholipid (GPL) composition. Changes in relative proportions of major molecular species of glycerophosphoethanolamines (GPEtns) and glycerophosphocholines (GPChols) in thoracic muscle and fat body tissues were followed using HPLC coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The increase in relative proportion of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleyl-sn-GPEtn at the expense of 1,2-dilinoleyl-sn-GPChol was the most prominent feature of the complex change observed in both tissues during autumnal acclimatization in the field. The relative proportion of total GPEtns increased, while the proportion of total GPChols decreased. The relative proportion of unsaturated fatty acyls slightly decreased. A similar restructuring response was seen during acclimatization in the field and cold acclimation in the laboratory. By contrast, the GPL changes related to desiccation and diapause progression were relatively small, differed qualitatively from the cold-acclimation response, and were accompanied with no increase of chill tolerance. Other features of autumnal acclimatization, i.e. depression of supercooling capacity and accumulation of polyhydric alcohols, were also triggered solely by low temperatures.
PubMed ID
17023604 View in PubMed
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[The effect of N-stearoylethanolamine on lipid composition of the metastases and conditionally normal lung tissue in mice with Lewis carcinoma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79845
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Mar-Apr;78(2):97-105
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hula N M
Khmel' T O
Klimashevs'kyi V M
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2006 Mar-Apr;78(2):97-105
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinoma, Lewis Lung - metabolism - pathology
Catalase - metabolism
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanolamines - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Lipid Peroxides - metabolism
Lung - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism - pathology
Male
Membrane Lipids - chemistry - metabolism
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neoplasm Metastasis
Stearic Acids - pharmacology
Abstract
Influence of NSE on lipid composition of metastases and the neighbouring conditionally normal lung tissue in mice with Lewis carcinoma was investigated. The processes of peroxidation in investigated tissues were also studied. It was shown that under the influence of NSE the high level of antioxidant activity in the metastases was decreased, while in the neighbouring conditionally normal lung tissue the catalase activity was increased. The content of the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in comparison with animals which were not fed by NSE was decreased. The development of carcinoma was accompanied by significant decrease of cholesterol level and by the increase of unsaturated fatty acids esterified in membrane phospholipids in both the metastases and the neighbouring conditionally normal lung tissue. An analysis of the phospholipid spectra shows that under tumor growth in investigated tissues the high-level lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was observed. The content of phosphatidyl choline (PC), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE), phosphatidyl serine (PS) was found to be significantly lower than in the lung of intact animals. It was found that administration of NSE to tumor-bearing mice contributed to the increase of cholesterol level, to the decrease of omega-6/omega-3 ratio polyunsaturated fatty acids of total phospholipids. NSE modulated the phospholipid membrane composition in both the metastases and the neighbouring conditionally normal lung tissue.
PubMed ID
17100291 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.