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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric factors and cutaneous melanoma: Prospective data from the population-based Janus Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294448
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 02 15; 142(4):681-690
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Jo S Stenehjem
Marit B Veierød
Lill Tove Nilsen
Reza Ghiasvand
Bjørn Johnsen
Tom K Grimsrud
Ronnie Babigumira
Judith R Rees
Trude E Robsahm
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2018 02 15; 142(4):681-690
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body mass index
Body surface area
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ultraviolet Rays
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to prospectively examine risk of cutaneous melanoma (CM) according to measured anthropometric factors, adjusted for exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), in a large population-based cohort in Norway. The Janus Cohort, including 292,851 Norwegians recruited 1972-2003, was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway and followed for CM through 2014. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of CM with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Restricted cubic splines were incorporated into the Cox models to assess possible non-linear relationships. All analyses were adjusted for attained age, indicators of UVR exposure, education, and smoking status. During a mean follow-up of 27 years, 3,000 incident CM cases were identified. In men, CM risk was positively associated with body mass index, body surface area (BSA), height and weight (all ptrends ?
Notes
ErratumIn: Int J Cancer. 2018 Apr 1;142(7):E3 PMID 29417601
PubMed ID
28983909 View in PubMed
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Birth order, family size, and the risk of cancer in young and middle-aged adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19773
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1466-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
K. Hemminki
P. Mutanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1466-71
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Birth Order
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Databases, Factual
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We used the Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the effects of birth order and family size on the risk of common cancers among offspring born over the period 1958-96. Some 1.38 million offspring up to age 55 years with 50.6 million person-years were included. Poisson regression analysis included age at diagnosis, birth cohort, socio-economic status and region of residence as other explanatory variables. The only significant associations were an increasing risk for breast cancer by birth order and a decreasing risk for melanoma by birth order and, particularly, by family size. When details of the women's own reproductive history were included in analysis, birth orders 5-17 showed a relative risk of 1.41. The effects on breast cancer may be mediated through increasing birth weight by birth order. For melanoma, socio-economic factors may be involved, such as limited affordability of sun tourism in large families. Testis cancer showed no significant effect and prostate cancer was excluded from analysis because of the small number of cases.
PubMed ID
11384095 View in PubMed
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Burn injuries and skin cancer: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86542
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2008;88(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lindelöf Bernt
Krynitz Britta
Granath Fredrik
Ekbom Anders
Author Affiliation
Unit of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. bernt.lindelof@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2008;88(1):20-2
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Burns - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Development of malignant tumours in chronic burn wounds or scars is extremely rare, but a frequently reported complication. Most of these tumours are squamous cell carcinoma and, more occasionally, basal cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma are reported. The interval between the initial burn and the diagnosis of the tumour is usually long; 20-30 years or more. A large number of case reports and small series of selected patients have been published. Only one epidemiological study has been performed recently, but it could not confirm any increased risk. We conducted a historical cohort study to assess the risk of cancer in Swedish patients with burn injuries. Using the national Inpatient Registry we identified 37,095 patients who had been hospitalized for burn injuries. This cohort was linked with the Swedish Cancer Registry for a virtually complete follow-up with regard to cancer. The mean follow-up time was 16.4 years (range >0-39). The risk of developing any form of cancer was slightly increased: standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.16) based on 2227 patients with cancer. However, squamous cell carcinoma: SIR 0.88 (95% CI 0.70-1.09) and malignant melanoma: SIR 0.88 (95% CI 0.68-1.12) did not occur more often than expected. Also, in a subgroup of 12,783 patients who were followed for 20-39 years, no increased risk of skin cancer could be detected. This study does not support any casual association between burn injuries and a later risk of skin cancer.
PubMed ID
18176744 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among firefighters: 45 years of follow-up in five Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105024
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Eero Pukkala
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Elisabete Weiderpass
Kristina Kjaerheim
Elsebeth Lynge
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Pär Sparén
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Firefighters
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies.
Data for this study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates.
A total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and skin melanoma (SIR=1.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.23), while there was almost no excess in the older ages. By contrast, an increased risk, mainly in ages of 70 years and higher, was observed for non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR=1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.76), multiple myeloma (SIR=1.69, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.51), adenocarcinoma of the lung (SIR=1.90, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.62), and mesothelioma (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.77). By contrast with earlier studies, the incidence of testicular cancer was decreased (SIR=0.51, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.98).
Some of these associations have been observed previously, and potential exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and shift work involving disruption of circadian rhythms may partly explain these results.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Aug;71(8):525-624996680
PubMed ID
24510539 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in airline cabin crew: experience from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18148
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Nov;60(11):810-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
A. Linnersjö
N. Hammar
B-G Dammström
M. Johansson
H. Eliasch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Stockholm Center of Public Health, Stockholm, Sweden. anette.linnersjo@imm.ki.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Nov;60(11):810-4
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Aircraft
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To determine the cancer incidence in Swedish cabin crew. METHODS: Cancer incidence of cabin crew at the Swedish Scandinavian Airline System (SAS) (2324 women and 632 men) employed from 1957 to 1994 was determined during 1961-96 from the Swedish National Cancer Register. The cancer incidence in cabin crew was compared with that of the general Swedish population by comparing observed and expected number of cases through standardised incidence ratios (SIR). A nested case-control study was performed, including cancer cases diagnosed after 1979 and four controls per case matched by gender, age, and calendar year. RESULTS: The SIR for cancer overall was 1.01 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.24) for women and 1.16 (95% CI 0.76 to 1.55) for men. Both men and women had an increased incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin (SIR 2.18 and 3.66 respectively) and men of non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR 4.42). Female cabin attendants had a non-significant increase of breast cancer (SIR 1.30; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.74). No clear associations were found between length of employment or cumulative block hours and cancer incidence. CONCLUSIONS: Swedish cabin crew had an overall cancer incidence similar to that of the general population. An increased incidence of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer may be associated with exposure to UV radiation, either at work or outside work. An increased risk of breast cancer in female cabin crew is consistent with our results and may in part be due to differences in reproductive history.
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2003 Nov;60(11):805-614573708
Erratum In: Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):94
PubMed ID
14573710 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in California flight attendants (United States).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19080
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Peggy Reynolds
James Cone
Michael Layefsky
Debbie E Goldberg
Susan Hurley
Author Affiliation
California Department of Health Services, Environmental Health Investigations Branch, Oakland 94612, USA.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 May;13(4):317-24
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Aircraft
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
California - epidemiology
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Social Class
Workplace
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine unusual exposure opportunities to flight crews from chemicals, cosmic radiation, and electric and magnetic fields. METHODS: This project evaluated the incidence of cancers of the breast and other sites among Association of Flight Attendants (AFA) members residing in California. AFA membership files were matched to California's statewide cancer registry to identify a total of 129 newly diagnosed invasive cancers among AFA members with California residential histories between 1988 and 1995. RESULTS: Compared to the general population, female breast cancer incidence was over 30% higher than expected, and malignant melanoma incidence was roughly twice that expected. Both of these are cancers that are associated with higher socioeconomic status and have been suggestively associated with various sources of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the results from Nordic studies of cabin crews and a recent meta-analysis of prior studies, these data suggest that follow-up investigations should focus on the potential relative contribution of workplace exposures and lifestyle characteristics to the higher rates of disease for these two cancers.
PubMed ID
12074501 View in PubMed
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Childhood Body Size and the Risk of Malignant Melanoma in Adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282033
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 15;185(8):673-680
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2017
Author
Kathrine D Meyle
Michael Gamborg
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Jennifer L Baker
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 15;185(8):673-680
Date
Apr-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Size
Body surface area
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Malignant melanoma (MM) is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. Adult anthropometry influences MM development; however, associations between childhood body size and future melanomagenesis are largely unknown. We investigated whether height, body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2), and body surface area (BSA) at ages 7-13 years and birth weight are associated with adult MM. Data from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, containing annual height and weight measurements of 372,636 Danish children born in 1930-1989, were linked with the Danish Cancer Registry. Cox regression analyses were performed. During follow-up, 2,329 MM cases occurred. Height at ages 7-13 years was significantly associated with MM, even after BMI and BSA adjustments. No significant BMI-MM or BSA-MM associations were detected when adjusting for height. Children who were persistently tall at both age 7 years and age 13 years had a significantly increased MM risk compared with children who grew taller between those ages. Birth weight was positively associated with MM. We conclude that associations between body size and MM originate early in life and are driven largely by height and birth weight, without any comparable influence of BMI or BSA. Melanoma transformation is unlikely to be due to height per se; however, height-regulating processes in childhood present new areas for mechanistic explorations of this disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28369155 View in PubMed
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[Clinico-genetic analysis of the incidence of neoplasms].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231489
Source
Sov Med. 1989;(6):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
T P Kazubskaia
T S Sitnikova
M D Nefedov
R F Ga'rkavtseva
Source
Sov Med. 1989;(6):16-9
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Moscow
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Abstract
The authors sum up the results of clinical and genealogic examinations of 2460 patients with most prevalent tumors, i.e. gastric and mammary carcinomas, melanomas. The obtained values of segregation frequencies for these tumors have proved to be lower than the theoretically expected values for monogenic types of inheritance. A genetic and epidemiologic approach, employed in the tumors analysis, has demonstrated the multifactorial nature of these tumors: the contribution of the genetic factors in mammary carcinoma has made up 52%, in gastric carcinoma 22% for male and 41.1% for female subjects, with the X-chromosome-linked genetic components making up 19%. The studies have shown the possibility of genetic heterogeneity of the tumor forms, identically localized. Basing on these data, the authors have plotted 'repeated risk tables' to assess the potentiality of new cases of the disease in the patients' families; such tables may be useful for practical medicogenetic counselling.
PubMed ID
2799486 View in PubMed
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Common and dysplastic naevi as risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25026
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(6):518-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A. Augustsson
U. Stierner
I. Rosdahl
M. Suurküla
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1991;71(6):518-24
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Dysplastic Nevus Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Nevus - complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Common naevi, dysplastic naevi (DN) and other phenotypic features were evaluated as melanoma risk factors in a Swedish case-control study. One-hundred and twenty-one prevalent melanoma cases and 378 randomly selected controls participated. The mean total body naevus count was 115 in the cases and 67 in the controls. Fifty-six per cent of the cases and 18% of the controls had clinical DN. The corresponding figures for histologically diagnosed DN were 40% and 8% respectively. Clinical DN was as good as histologically diagnosed DN in identifying individuals at risk for melanoma. Subjects with sun-sensitive skin, greater than or equal to 150 naevi and presence of DN have 50 times higher melanoma risk than those without these characteristics.
PubMed ID
1685835 View in PubMed
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85 records – page 1 of 9.