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40-year trends in skin cancer in British Columbia, Canada, 1973 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125127
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
David I McLean
Norm Phillips
Youwen Zhou
Richard Gallagher
Tim K Lee
Author Affiliation
Prevention Programs and Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer Agency, BC. david.mclean@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2012 Mar-Apr;16(2):83-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Skin cancer is common in North America. Incidence rate trends are potentially important in the assessment of the effects of measures to increase sun awareness in the population as well as measures to reduce sun damage.
To determine the incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a geographically defined Canadian population over a 40-year period.
Data were obtained from the BC Cancer Registry for the calendar years 1973, 1983, 1993, and 2003.
Age-standardized incidence rates increased significantly from 1973 to 2003 for BCC, SCC, and CMM.
The ethnic makeup of British Columbia has changed over time, and a novel method of accounting for the effect of this on skin cancer rates is presented.
The incidence rate for skin cancers continued to rise in British Columbia, but there appears to have been a decline in the incidence of CMM and BCC in the youngest cohorts.
PubMed ID
22513059 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Actinic Keratosis Diagnosis and Increased Risk of Developing Skin Cancer: A 10-year Cohort Study of 17,651 Patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311024
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Ghassan Guorgis
Chris D Anderson
Johan Lyth
Magnus Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2020 Apr 29; 100(8):adv00128
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Keratosis, Actinic - diagnosis
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Actinic keratosis is the most common actinic lesion in fair-skinned populations. It is accepted as an indicator of actinic skin damage and as an occasional precursor of squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate, in a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, the relative risk of developing skin cancer during a follow-up period of 10 years. This registry-based cohort study compared a cohort of 2,893 individuals in south-eastern Sweden, who were diagnosed with actinic keratosis during the period 2000 to 2004, with a matched-control cohort of 14,668 individuals without actinic keratosis during the same inclusion period. The subjects were followed for 10 years to identify skin cancer development in both cohorts. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used as risk measures. Individuals in the actinic keratosis cohort had a markedly higher risk for all skin cancer forms compared with the control cohort (hazard ratio (HR) 5.1, 95% CI 4.7-5.6). The relative risk was highest for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (HR 7.7, 95% CI 6.7-8.8) and somewhat lower for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (HR 4.4, 95% CI 4.1-5.0) and malignant melanoma (MM) (HR 2.7 (2.1-3.6). Patients with a diagnosis of actinic keratosis were found to be at increased risk of developing SCC, BCC and MM in the 10 years following diagnosis of actinic keratosis. In conclusion, a diagnosis of actinic keratosis, even in the absence of documentation of other features of chronic sun exposure, is a marker of increased risk of skin cancer, which should be addressed with individually directed preventive advice.
PubMed ID
32314794 View in PubMed
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Adjusting and comparing survival curves by means of an additive risk model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21578
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
P H Zahl
O O Aalen
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo. perhz@biostat.washington.edu
Source
Lifetime Data Anal. 1998;4(2):149-68
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Survival curves may be adjusted for covariates using Aalen's additive risk model. Survival curves may be compared by taking the ratio of two adjusted survival curves; the ratio is denoted the generalized relative survival rate. Adjusting both survival curves for all but one of a common set of covariates gives the partial relative survival rate, which measures the covariate-specific contribution to the generalized relative survival rate. The generalized and partial relative survival rates have interpretations similar to the traditional relative survival rates frequently used in cancer epidemiology. In fact, the traditional relative survival rate can be generalized to a regression context using the additive risk model. This population-adjusted relative survival rate is an alternative and useful method for removing confounding effects of age, cohorts, and sex. The authors use a data set of malignant melanoma patients diagnosed from 1965 to 1974 in Norway. The 25-year survival of 1967 individuals is studied.
PubMed ID
9658773 View in PubMed
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[Alarming increase in skin cancer. Doubled number of cases within 10 years, according to forecasts from southern Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256680
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Aug 6-19;111(32-33):1309-10
Publication Type
Article

[Anal cancer in Iceland 1987-2003. A population based study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82038
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 May;92(5):365-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Vietharsdóttir Halla
Moeller Páll Helgi
Jóhannsson Jakob
Jónasson Jón Gunnlaugur
Author Affiliation
Department of surgery, Iceland University Hospital, Hringbraut, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Laeknabladid. 2006 May;92(5):365-72
Date
May-2006
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Aged
Anus Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Carcinoma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Adenosquamous - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Defecation
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Neoplasm Staging
Pain - etiology
Pruritus - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anal cancer is a rare disease. The aim of this study was to describe anal cancer in Iceland in 1987-2003 with respect to incidence, histologic type, treatment, recurrence rate and survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study in which all malignant anal tumours diagnosed in Iceland in the period 1987-2003 were reviewed with respect to patient outcome. Information was obtained from hospitals registers. All histological material was reviewed by a consultant histopathologist (JGJ). This is a nationwide, population-based study of malignant tumours of the anal region. RESULTS: From 1987-2003 thirty-eight patients were diagnosed with anal cancer, 28 females and 10 males. The average age at diagnosis was 63.4 years. Age standardized incidence rates for anal cancer in Iceland were 0.3 (+/-0.2) of 100.000 males and 0.9 (+/-0.4) of 100.000 females. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (n=30). The remaining histologic types were malignant melanoma (n=3), adenosquamous carcinoma (n=1), adenocarcinoma (n=1), GIST (n=1) and undifferentiated carcinoma (n=2). The most common symptoms were rectal bleeding (n=27), mass lesion (n=28), pain (n=19) and pruritus (n=4). Most patients had more than one symptom. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis ranged from 2 weeks to 96 months (mean value 3.5 months). Treatment modalities used were chemotherapy (n=12), radiotherapy (n=25) and local excision (n=18) and/or APR (n=5). One patient received no treatment. Many patients were treated with more than one treatment modality (n=18). Twelve patients had recurrent cancer. The mean value of the time from diagnosis of the primary to the recurrent cancer was 15.6 months (range, 5.9-117). Sixteen patients remain with disease and ten have died of anal cancer. The five year survival rate for patients diagnosed in the years 1987 to 1998 is 75% but cancer-specific survival is 82%. CONCLUSION: Age-standardized incidence for anal cancer in Iceland is similar to other regions. Average age at diagnosis, male-female ratio and prognosis is similar to reports in other studies. The proportion of adenocarcinoma of the anus is lower in Iceland than elsewhere.
PubMed ID
16741319 View in PubMed
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Anatomic distribution of acquired melanocytic nevi in white children. A comparison with melanoma: the Vancouver Mole Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229352
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1990 Apr;126(4):466-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
R P Gallagher
D I McLean
C P Yang
A J Coldman
H K Silver
J J Spinelli
M. Beagrie
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Biometry, and Occupational Oncology, Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1990 Apr;126(4):466-71
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body surface area
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - pathology
Nevus, Pigmented - epidemiology - pathology
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Sunlight
Abstract
The presence of acquired benign nevi is a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma, yet relatively little is known about the etiology of nevi. We have conducted a study of the prevalence of melanocytic nevi among 1146 white Vancouver (Canada) schoolchildren aged 6 to 18 years. Numbers of nevi per square meter of body surface area increase with age in children of both sexes. Male adolescents have more nevi than female adolescents on the head and neck as well as on the trunk, while prevalence in females is higher on the upper and lower limbs. This distribution parallels that of cutaneous melanoma in British Columbia adults. Nevi are more common in children on intermittently exposed body sites than on constantly or minimally sun-exposed sites. This suggests that exposure to strong intermittent sunlight in childhood (a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma) may also be important in the etiology of acquired benign nevi.
PubMed ID
2321992 View in PubMed
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An empirical Bayes formulation of cohort models in cancer epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24777
Source
Stat Med. 1991 Aug;10(8):1241-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1991
Author
C M Desouza
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Wilmington 28403-3297.
Source
Stat Med. 1991 Aug;10(8):1241-56
Date
Aug-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bayes Theorem
Cohort Studies
Connecticut - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper concerns the incidence rates of malignant skin melanoma for several age-sex groups and time periods in three geographic regions, uses a method of cohort analysis and employs a two-stage random effects model. The first stage entails the assumption that the within-region variation in the frequency of disease incidence for a fixed age-sex-cohort group has a Poisson distribution with mean proportional to the population at risk. The second stage, after adjusting for age and sex, entails the assumption that the between-region geographic variation in the logarithm of the true incidence rate has a prior distribution with parameters estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. After adjusting for age effects, we estimate random geographic-specific cohort effects for each sex with use of an empirical Bayes method and compare the results with the usual multiplicative Poisson model that assumes fixed geographic-specific cohort effects for each sex. This comparison shows that the method presented here provides more stable estimates of geographic-specific cohort effects, and in addition the random effects model describes these data more adequately.
PubMed ID
1925155 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of cancer in adult twins born in Norway 1905-1945.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19774
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1463-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
T. Iversen
S. Tretli
E. Kringlen
Author Affiliation
The Department of Oncology, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jun 1;84(11):1463-5
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
We have identified 23 334 individuals (40%) of twins born in Norway 1905-45 where both twins were alive in 1960 without malignant disease. These were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. A reduced risk of malignant disease was demonstrated among twins for all tumour sites combined; standardized incidence rate (SIR): 0.90 (95% CI 0.85-0.94) in females and 0.95 (95% Cl 0.90-0.99) in males. In both sexes, we observed a significant reduced incidence of malignant melanomas of the skin. The incidence of colorectal cancer tended to be reduced for both sexes. In females, the incidence of tumours of the central nervous system and lungs were reduced. We consider our findings are real, but cannot explain them.
PubMed ID
11384094 View in PubMed
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The annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1973-1997, with a special section on colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3976
Source
Cancer. 2000 May 15;88(10):2398-424
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2000
Author
L A Ries
P A Wingo
D S Miller
H L Howe
H K Weir
H M Rosenberg
S W Vernon
K. Cronin
B K Edwards
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
Source
Cancer. 2000 May 15;88(10):2398-424
Date
May-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Bronchial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Continental Population Groups
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Survival Rate
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This annual report to the nation addresses progress in cancer prevention and control in the U.S. with a special section on colorectal cancer. This report is the joint effort of the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), including the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). METHODS: Age-adjusted rates were based on cancer incidence data from the NCI and NAACCR and underlying cause of death as compiled by NCHS. Joinpoint analysis was based on NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program incidence rates and NCHS death rates for 1973-1997. The prevalence of screening examinations for colorectal cancer was obtained from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the NCHS's National Health Interview Survey. RESULTS: Between 1990-1997, overall cancer incidence and death rates declined. Joinpoint analyses of cancer incidence and death rates confirmed the declines described in earlier reports. The incidence trends for colorectal cancer have shown recent steep declines for whites in contrast to a leveling off of the rates for blacks. State-to-state variations occurred in colorectal cancer screening prevalence as well as incidence and death rates. CONCLUSIONS: The continuing declines in overall cancer incidence and death rates are encouraging. However, a few of the top ten incidence or mortality cancer sites continued to increase or remained level. For many cancer sites, whites had lower incidence and mortality rates than blacks but higher rates than Hispanics, Asian and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. The variations in colorectal cancer incidence and death rates by race/ethnicity, gender, age, and geographic area may be related to differences in risk factors, demographic characteristics, screening, and medical practice. New efforts currently are underway to increase awareness of screening benefits and treatment for colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
10820364 View in PubMed
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362 records – page 1 of 37.