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Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101847
Source
Environ Pollut. 2011 May;159(5):1307-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Pedro Echeveste
Susana Agustí
Jordi Dachs
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marqués 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears, Spain. pecheveste@imedea.uib-csic.es
Source
Environ Pollut. 2011 May;159(5):1307-16
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aquatic Organisms - cytology - drug effects - radiation effects
Atlantic Ocean
Mediterranean Sea
Phytoplankton - cytology - drug effects - radiation effects
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - toxicity
Ultraviolet Rays
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p=0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p=0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased.
PubMed ID
21330023 View in PubMed
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A climatology based on reanalysis of baroclinic developmental regions in the extratropical northern hemisphere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95466
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
de la Torre Laura
Nieto Raquel
Noguerol Marta
Añel Juan Antonio
Gimeno Luis
Author Affiliation
Facultade de Ciencias de Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, Ourense, Spain. ltr@uvigo.es
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmospheric Pressure
Cyclones
Mediterranean Sea
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Regions of the occurrence of different phenomena related to the development of baroclinic disturbances are reviewed for the Northern Hemisphere extratropics, using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data. The occurrence of height lows appears to be related to the orography near the earth's surface and with surface- and upper-air cyclogenesis in the upper troposphere. Over the cyclone tracks, the surface maxima appear to be trapped by land masses, whereas over the Mediterranean Sea they are located on the lee side of mountain ranges. The forcing terms of the geopotential tendency and omega equations mark the genesis (and, by the vorticity advection terms, the path) of the extratropical cyclones on the storm track. They occur mostly over the western coast of the oceans, beginning and having maxima on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Their associated fronts form from the cold air coming from the continents and converging with the warm air over the Gulf and Kuroshio currents. Evident trends are found only for the Atlantic cyclone track (positive) and the Pacific cyclone track (negative) until the last decade when the tendency reverses. Over the southern Pacific, the number of fronts is lower during 1978-1997, coinciding with a period of strong El Ni?o Southern Oscillation episodes. This information is important for validating numerical models in order to predict changes associated with climate change and to study the behavior of extratropical cyclones and fronts.
PubMed ID
19076418 View in PubMed
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Fauna of tintinnids (Tintinnida, Ciliata) during an Arctic-Antarctic cruise, with the S/V "Croatian Tern".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292065
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 21; 4399(3):301-314
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-21-2018
Author
Frano KrŠiniC
Author Affiliation
Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Šetalište I. Meštrovica 63, 21000 Split, Croatia.. fkrsinic@izor.hr.
Source
Zootaxa. 2018 Mar 21; 4399(3):301-314
Date
Mar-21-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Charadriiformes
Ciliophora
Mediterranean Sea
Newfoundland and Labrador
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
An investigation of large tintinnids was carried out during the Arctic-Antarctic cruise aboard the S/V "Croatian Tern" in the period from 1994 to 1997. Samples were collected at 33 stations by vertical tows with a Nansen net with a 53 µm mesh size in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic, Labrador Sea, Baffin Bay, the Beaufort, Chukchi and Bering Seas, East North Pacific, South Pacific, South East Pacific, Scotia Sea, and South West Atlantic. A total of 47 species of tintinnids were found, with the greatest diversity in the Tropical areas of the Pacific, Arctic and Subarctic. A very high total abundance was registered in the Bering Sea of 247,393 ind.m-3 and in the South-eastern Pacific of 66,211 ind.m-3. The dominant species in the northern areas was Ptychocylis obtusa and in the southern areas Eutintinnus rugosus.
PubMed ID
29690314 View in PubMed
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Frequency of CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion in Croatian normal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7130
Source
Croat Med J. 2005 Aug;46(4):693-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Smiljana Ristic
Nada Starcevic Cizmarevic
Bojana Brajenovic-Milic
Marija Crnic-Martinovic
Miljenko Kapovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology and Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Rijeka, Brace Branchetta 20, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia. smiljana.ristic@mamed.medri.hr
Source
Croat Med J. 2005 Aug;46(4):693-4
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Croatia - epidemiology
Europe, Eastern
Genetics, Population
HIV Infections - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Mediterranean Sea
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Sequence Deletion
Abstract
A 32-basepair deletion polymorphism in the CCR5 chemokine receptor gene (CCR5 TROKUT 32) could increase the resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. This mutant allele is common among Caucasians of Western European descent, but has not been observed in people of African or Asian ancestry. Genetic studies provided in European countries have shown a highest prevalence in Nordic countries and the lowest in the Southern European and Mediterranean populations. We genotyped 303 randomly selected healthy Croatians for the prevalence of CCR5 TROKUT 32 mutation. CCR5 TROKUT 32 allele frequency in Croatia of 7.1% fits in the observed European north/south gradient. This first report of CCR5 TROKUT 32 mutation in Croatian population provides additional information on its frequency and geographical distribution in Slavic populations in South-Eastern Europe. Moreover, our data may have important implications for the prediction and prevention of HIV/AIDS in a tourist country such as Croatia.
PubMed ID
16100775 View in PubMed
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Microplastics in the crustaceans Nephrops norvegicus and Aristeus antennatus: Flagship species for deep-sea environments?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308402
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Dec; 255(Pt 1):113107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Alessandro Cau
Carlo Giacomo Avio
Claudia Dessì
Maria Cristina Follesa
Davide Moccia
Francesco Regoli
Antonio Pusceddu
Author Affiliation
Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e dell'Ambiente, Via Tommaso Fiorelli 1, 09126, Cagliari, Italy; Consorzio Interuniversitario per le Scienze del Mare, CoNISMa, ULR Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: alessandrocau@unica.it.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Dec; 255(Pt 1):113107
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fisheries
Fishes
Italy
Mediterranean Sea
Microplastics - analysis
Nephropidae - chemistry
Norway
Penaeidae - chemistry
Polyethylene - analysis
Polypropylenes - analysis
Seafood - analysis
Stomach - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Ingestion of microplastics (MPs) has been documented in several marine organisms, but their occurrence in deep-sea species remains almost unknown. In this study, MPs were investigated in two economically and ecologically key crustaceans of the Mediterranean Sea, the Norwegian lobster Nephrops norvegicus and the shrimp Aristeus antennatus. Both the species were collected from 14 sites around Sardinia Island, at depths comprised between 270 and 660?m. A total of 89 and 63 stomachs were analysed for N. norvegicus and A. antennatus respectively, and more than 2000?MPs-like particles were extracted and sorted for identification and characterization by µFT-IR. In N. norvegicus, 83% of the specimens contained MPs, with an average abundance of 5.5?±?0.8?MPs individual-1, while A. antennatus showed a lower frequency of ingestion (67%) and a lower mean number of MPs (1.66?±?0.1?MPs individual-1). Composition and size of particles differed significantly between the two species. The non-selective feeding strategy of N. norvegicus could explain the 3-5 folds higher numbers of MPs in its stomach, which were mostly composed of films and fragments derived by polyethylene and polypropylene single-use plastic items. Contrarily, most MPs in the stomachs of A. antennatus were polyester filaments. The MPs abundance observed in N. norvegicus is among the highest detected in Mediterranean species considering both fish and invertebrates species, and provides novel insights on MPs bioavailability in deep-sea habitats. The overall results suggest that both N. norvegicus and A. antennatus, easily available in common fishery markets, could be valuable bioindicators and flagship species for plastic contamination in the deep-sea.
PubMed ID
31671310 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of perfluorooctane sulfonate and other perfluorinated alkylated substances in harbor porpoises from the Black Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78951
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jan 1;41(1):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2007
Author
Van de Vijver Kristin Inneke
Holsbeek Ludo
Das Krishna
Blust Ronny
Joiris Claude
De Coen Wim
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen, Belgium. inneke.vandevijver@ua.ac.be
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Jan 1;41(1):315-20
Date
Jan-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Brain Chemistry
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Environmental Monitoring - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fluorocarbons - analysis
Kidney - chemistry
Liver - chemistry
Male
Mediterranean Sea
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry
Nitrogen Isotopes - analysis
Phocoena - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFAS) were determined in liver, kidney, muscle, brain, and blubber samples of 31 harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena relicta) of different age and sex stranded along the Ukrainian coast of the Black Sea. In all individuals and in all tissues, PFOS was the predominant PFAS, accounting for on average 90% of the measured PFAS load. PFOS concentrations were the highest in liver (327+/-351 ng/g wet wt) and kidney (147 +/-262 ng/g wet wt) tissue, and lower in blubber (18+/-8 ng/g wet wt), muscle (41+/-50 ng/g wet wt), and brain (24 +/-23 ng/g wetwt). No significant differences could be determined between males and females, nor between juvenile and adult animals (p > 0.05). Perfluorononanoic acid, perfluorodecanoic acid, perfluoroundecanoic acid, and perfluorododecanoic acid could be detected in liver tissue of approximately 25% of the individuals. Perfluorobutane sulfonate, perfluorobutanoic acid, and perfluorooctanoic acid were not detected in any of the porpoise livers. Although we investigated a potential intraspecies segregation according to the source of prey, using stable isotopes, no statistically significant correlation between PFOS concentrations and stable isotopes could be determined. It is, however, noteworthy that the contamination by PFOS in the Black Sea harbor porpoises is comparable to levels found in porpoises from the German Baltic Sea and from coastal areas near Denmark and, therefore, might pose a threat to this population.
PubMed ID
17265965 View in PubMed
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Reproductive biology of female Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus (Linnaeus, 1758) Leach, in Icelandic waters during the period 1960-2010: comparative overview of distribution areas in the Northeast Atlantic and the Mediterranean.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257548
Source
Adv Mar Biol. 2014;68:65-210
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hrafnkell Eiríksson
Author Affiliation
Marine Research Institute, Skúlagata 4, Reykjavík, Iceland. Electronic address: keli@hafro.is.
Source
Adv Mar Biol. 2014;68:65-210
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Atlantic Ocean
Female
Iceland
Mediterranean Sea
Nephropidae - physiology
Reproduction - physiology
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Maturity size, reproductive cycle, sex ratio and fecundity of female Nephrops were investigated at SW, S and SE Iceland for the period 1960-2010. Time series of biological parameters and fisheries data displayed significant relationships. In addition, female biological data from 20 areas in the Atlantic and Mediterranean were compared. Fifty percentage maturity estimates had an overall range of 23.9-34.4mm CL with some anomalies in the 2000s. The reproductive cycle in Iceland has been biennial during the whole study period from mid-1960s to 2010 with minor change in phase in the 2000s. Biennial moulting retards female growth more than annual spawning, and the length of incubation and hatch time of year show significant relationships with latitude and sea temperature. Variations in sex ratio were observed and relationships found between female sex ratio and CL, CPUE and stock biomass during 1961-2010, displaying apparent fishery-induced effects on sex ratio. Potential and realized fecundity estimates in Iceland are 35-50% of those reported from more southerly waters. Biennial spawning and low fecundity limit the number of progeny in Icelandic Nephrops and necessitate lower fishing mortality. Ambient temperature in Icelandic waters has risen by 1°C since the late 1990s, generating around 30 days shorter incubation time in the 2000s, but around 3°C rise is necessary for possible annual spawning.
PubMed ID
24981733 View in PubMed
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Wind-associated detours promote seasonal migratory connectivity in a flapping flying long-distance avian migrant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308766
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2020 02; 89(2):635-646
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2020
Author
Gabriel Norevik
Susanne Åkesson
Tom Artois
Natalie Beenaerts
Greg Conway
Brian Cresswell
Ruben Evens
Ian Henderson
Frédéric Jiguet
Anders Hedenström
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Centre for Animal Movement Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Anim Ecol. 2020 02; 89(2):635-646
Date
02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Africa, Northern
Animal Migration
Animals
Birds
England
Mediterranean Sea
Seasons
Sweden
Wind
Abstract
It is essential to gain knowledge about the causes and extent of migratory connectivity between stationary periods of migrants to further the understanding of processes affecting populations, and to allow efficient implementation of conservation efforts throughout the annual cycle. Avian migrants likely use optimal routes with respect to mode of locomotion, orientation and migration strategy, influenced by external factors such as wind and topography. In self-powered flapping flying birds, any increases in fuel loads are associated with added flight costs. Energy-minimizing migrants are therefore predicted to trade-off extended detours against reduced travel across ecological barriers with no or limited foraging opportunities. Here, we quantify the extent of detours taken by different populations of European nightjars Caprimulgus europaeus, to test our predictions that they used routes beneficial according to energetic principles and evaluate the effect of route shape on seasonal migratory connectivity. We combined data on birds tracked from breeding sites along a longitudinal gradient from England to Sweden. We analysed the migratory connectivity between breeding and main non-breeding sites, and en route stopover sites just south of the Sahara desert. We quantified each track's route extension relative to the direct route between breeding and wintering sites, respectively, and contrasted it to the potential detour derived from the barrier reduction along the track while accounting for potential wind effects. Nightjars extended their tracks from the direct route between breeding and main non-breeding sites as they crossed the Mediterranean Sea-Sahara desert, the major ecological barrier in the Palaearctic-African migration system. These clockwise detours were small for birds from eastern sites but increased from east to west breeding longitude. Routes of the tracked birds were associated with partial reduction in the barrier crossing resulting in a trade-off between route extension and barrier reduction, as expected in an energy-minimizing migrant. This study demonstrates how the costs of barrier crossings in prevailing winds can disrupt migratory routes towards slightly different goals, and thereby promote migratory connectivity. This is an important link between individual migration strategies in association with an ecological barrier, and both spatially and demographic population patterns.
PubMed ID
31581321 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.