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383 records – page 1 of 39.

[A complex approach to protecting the health of military missile personnel (an interview of Colonel General V. N. Iakovlev, Commander-in-Chief of the Strategic Missile Forces). Interview by N. F. Shalaev].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203670
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1998 Oct;319(10):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998

Activating knowledge for patient safety practices: a Canadian academic-policy partnership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129005
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Margaret B Harrison
Wendy Nicklin
Marie Owen
Christina Godfrey
Janice McVeety
Val Angus
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. margaret.b.harrison@queensu.ca
Source
Worldviews Evid Based Nurs. 2012 Feb;9(1):49-58
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Evidence-Based Practice - methods - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration - standards
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration - standards
State Medicine - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Over the past decade, the need for healthcare delivery systems to identify and address patient safety issues has been propelled to the forefront. A Canadian survey, for example, demonstrated patient safety to be a major concern of frontline nurses (Nicklin & McVeety 2002). Three crucial patient safety elements, current knowledge, resources, and context of care have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO 2009). To develop strategies to respond to the scope and mandate of the WHO report within the Canadian context, a pan-Canadian academic-policy partnership has been established.
This newly formed Pan-Canadian Partnership, the Queen's Joanna Briggs Collaboration for Patient Safety (referred throughout as "QJBC" or "the Partnership"), includes the Queen's University School of Nursing, Accreditation Canada, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and is supported by an active and committed advisory council representing over 10 national organizations representing all sectors of the health continuum, including patients/families advocacy groups, professional associations, and other bodies. This unique partnership is designed to provide timely, focused support from academia to the front line of patient safety. QJBC has adopted an "integrated knowledge translation" approach to identify and respond to patient safety priorities and to ensure active engagement with stakeholders in producing and using available knowledge. Synthesis of evidence and guideline adaptation methodologies are employed to access quantitative and qualitative evidence relevant to pertinent patient safety questions and subsequently, to respond to issues of feasibility, meaningfulness, appropriateness/acceptability, and effectiveness.
This paper describes the conceptual grounding of the Partnership, its proposed methods, and its plan for action. It is hoped that our journey may provide some guidance to others as they develop patient safety models within their own arenas.
PubMed ID
22151727 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Swedish Armed Forces medical services to meet new challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196201
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):824-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
E. Dalenius
Author Affiliation
Swedish Armed Forces Medical Centre, S-66381 Hammaro, Sweden.
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):824-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Sweden
War
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The land battle today is different from that of 20 years ago. It now occurs over vast areas, the fluid battlefield. Tanks have undergone important changes (cross-country capability, improved armor, and more lethal weapons). The combat units contain armored personnel carriers, providing protection for the soldier. The weapon effects on armored vehicle personnel are well studied and include ballistic, blast, thermal, and toxic injury. However, casualty statistics for armored units are not extensively reported. The public acceptance of casualties, especially in peacekeeping operations, today is much lower than in the past. A study by the Swedish Armed Forces has identified the need for a new organizational structure. Casualties will be picked up on the battlefield by armored medical evacuation vehicles and transported directly to the battalion aid station. The training level of all medical personnel must be increased, using battlefield-related trauma courses and making better use of existing resources in the form of qualified medical practitioners.
PubMed ID
11143427 View in PubMed
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Analysing the diffusion and adoption of mobile IT across social worlds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259650
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Jeppe Agger Nielsen
Shegaw Anagaw Mengiste
Source
Health Informatics J. 2014 Jun;20(2):87-103
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cell Phones
Computers, Handheld
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Social Networking
State Medicine - organization & administration
Abstract
The diffusion and adoption of information technology innovations (e.g. mobile information technology) in healthcare organizations involves a dynamic process of change with multiple stakeholders with competing interests, varying commitments, and conflicting values. Nevertheless, the extant literature on mobile information technology diffusion and adoption has predominantly focused on organizations and individuals as the unit of analysis, with little emphasis on the environment in which healthcare organizations are embedded. We propose the social worlds approach as a promising theoretical lens for dealing with this limitation together with reports from a case study of a mobile information technology innovation in elderly home care in Denmark including both the sociopolitical and organizational levels in the analysis. Using the notions of social worlds, trajectories, and boundary objects enables us to show how mobile information technology innovation in Danish home care can facilitate negotiation and collaboration across different social worlds in one setting while becoming a source of tension and conflicts in others. The trajectory of mobile information technology adoption was shaped by influential stakeholders in the Danish home care sector. Boundary objects across multiple social worlds legitimized the adoption, but the use arrangement afforded by the new technology interfered with important aspects of home care practices, creating resistance among the healthcare personnel.
PubMed ID
24810724 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the structure of forensic chemical studies carried out in the Perm regional bureau of forensic medical expert evaluations in 1997-2000].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189099
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2002 May-Jun;45(3):35-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O N Kushnireva
L O Kon'shina
T L Malkova
V P Garanin
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2002 May-Jun;45(3):35-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Forensic Medicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Russia
Abstract
Analysis of statistical data on forensic chemical studies carried out in the Perm Regional Bureau of Forensic Medical Expert Evaluations in 1997-2000 indicates an increased number of expert evaluations with positive results. The specific share of expert evaluations with positive results for Perm was 66.6% of the total number of evaluations. The absolute number of the detected agents in combinations with other agents increased more than 2-fold over the studied period. The number of detected agents increased 1.8 times, the rate of detection of narcotics increased sharply (6.5 times).
PubMed ID
12165962 View in PubMed
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[Anesthesiological care in the treatment system for minor casualties].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220781
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1993 Jul;(7):26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993

An ounce of prevention: a pound of cure for an ailing health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161318
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Apr;53(4):597-9, 605-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Stephen J Genuis
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton. sgenius@ualberta.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Apr;53(4):597-9, 605-7
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Care Reform
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Physician's Practice Patterns
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Preventive Medicine - organization & administration
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 1998 Apr 15;279(15):1200-59555760
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Mar 24-31;281(12):1106-910188661
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Feb;59(2):101-515650139
Cites: East Mediterr Health J. 2003 May;9(3):441-715751938
Cites: J Am Board Fam Pract. 2005 Sep-Oct;18(5):419-2516148254
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 29-Nov 4;366(9496):151416257331
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 29-Nov 4;366(9496):1578-8216257345
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Oct 22;161(19):2317-2311606147
PubMed ID
17872698 View in PubMed
Less detail

AOEC position paper on the organizational code for ethical conduct.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211192
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1996 Sep;38(9):869-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996

383 records – page 1 of 39.