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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Antianginal and cardioprotective effects of Terminalia arjuna, an indigenous drug, in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218554
Source
J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Apr;42(4):287-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
S. Dwivedi
M P Agarwal
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, UCMS, Delhi.
Source
J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Apr;42(4):287-9
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - blood - drug therapy
Angina, Unstable - blood - drug therapy
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - blood - drug therapy
Drug Therapy, Combination
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Exercise Test - drug effects
Hemodynamics - drug effects
Humans
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Plant Extracts - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The effect of bark powder of Terminalia arjuna, an indigenous drug, on anginal frequency, blood pressure, body mass index, blood sugar, cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was studied in 15 stable (Group A) and 5 unstable (Group B) angina patients before and 3 months after T. arjuna therapy. Tread mill test (TMT) and echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction was evaluated in some cases. There was 50% reduction in anginal episodes in Group A cases (P
Notes
Comment In: J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Apr;42(4):281-27860542
Comment In: J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Sep;42(9):7567883690
Comment In: J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Sep;42(9):7577883693
PubMed ID
7741874 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ayurvedism: eastern medicine moves west.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226969
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jan 15;144(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1991
Author
B. Goldman
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jan 15;144(2):218-21
Date
Jan-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Behavior
Biochemical Phenomena
Biochemistry
Canada
Disease
Humans
Medicine
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Jul 1;145(1):9-122049699
PubMed ID
1986838 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical evaluation of a herbal antidiabetic product.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218472
Source
J Indian Med Assoc. 1994 Apr;92(4):115-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B. Sadhukhan
U. Roychowdhury
P. Banerjee
S. Sen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, IPGME & R and SSKM Hospital, Calcutta.
Source
J Indian Med Assoc. 1994 Apr;92(4):115-7
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - therapy
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Middle Aged
Plants, Medicinal - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sixty-seven diabetic patients and 12 normal subjects were selected for a clinical study with an indigenous herbal product. The study consisted of 2 phases. In phase 1 study out of 25 diabetics (both insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent) only those in the age group of 41-50 years ie, 11 cases showed lowering of mean high blood sugar level in all samples from 1/2 an-hour to 2 hours with the test drug containing guar gum, methi, tundika and mesha shringi. But in phase 2 study there was lowering of blood sugar level with the test drug and with 2 of its constituents ie, guar gum and methi when used separately in 42 non-insulin dependent diabetics. While there was some blood sugar level lowering effect with guar gum and methi when used separately in 12 normal subjects in phase 2 study, but that was not the same observed with the test drug. The results of this study indicate the efficacy of the product as an adjuvant.
PubMed ID
8083548 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diabetes and alternative medicine: diabetic patients experiences with Ayur-Ved, "clinical ecology" and "cellular nutrition" methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190430
Source
Minerva Pediatr. 2002 Apr;54(2):165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
M. Vanelli
G. Chiari
M. Gugliotta
C. Capuano
T. Giacalone
L. Gruppi
M. Condò
Author Affiliation
Azienda Ospedaliera, Servizio Regionale di Diabetologia Pediatrica, Dipartimento dell'Età Evolutiva, Università degli Studi, Parma, Italy. vanelli@unipr.it
Source
Minerva Pediatr. 2002 Apr;54(2):165-9
Date
Apr-2002
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Abstract
In the last two years we discovered that three of our patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (0.8%) suffered an unexpected worsening in their glycemic control due to a reduction of their insulin dosage in favour of some "alternative" diabetes treatments using herbs, vitamins, fantastic diets and trace elements prescribed by non-medical practitioners. The first patient, a 6.6 year old boy, was admitted to hospital because of a severe ketoacidosis with first degree coma as a result of his parents having reduced his insulin dosage by 77% and replacing the insulin with an ayurvedic herbal preparation (Bardana Actium Lapp). The second patient, a 10.4 year old boy, was admitted to hospital after his teachers noticed that he appeared tired, thinner and polyuric. During hospital admission for mild ketoacidosis the mother, reluctant at first, finally confessed that her son was under the care of a "clinical ecologist". Having identified several food allergies this "clinical ecologist" had placed the child on a spartan diet of bread, water and salt, and had reduced his insulin dosage by 68%. The third patient, a 21 year old male, upon transfer to the Adult Diabetic Center, reported that he had been under the care of a pranotherapist for several years. The pranotherapist had prescribed a cellular nutrition preparation (called "Madonna drops"), a meditation program and also a 50% reduction in his insulin dosage. During this period his HbAlc values had increased from 6.4% to 12%. Current orthodox diabetes treatments are considered unsatisfactory by many people and it is thus not surprising that they search for "miracle" cures. It is important, however, that hospital staff do not ridicule the patients or their parents for trying these alternative therapies. Nevertheless, it would be useful for staff to discuss in advance these "therapies" with patients, highlighting their ineffectiveness and strongly discouraging cures that call for a reduction or elimination of the insulin treatment.
PubMed ID
11981532 View in PubMed
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A double-blind clinical trial of kamalahar, an indigenous compound preparation, in acute viral hepatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220178
Source
Indian J Gastroenterol. 1993 Oct;12(4):126-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
D G Das
Author Affiliation
Clinical Pharmacology Department, Government General Hospital, Guntur.
Source
Indian J Gastroenterol. 1993 Oct;12(4):126-8
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Double-Blind Method
Female
Hepatitis, Viral, Human - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Middle Aged
Plant Extracts - therapeutic use
Abstract
Kamalahar is an indigenous preparation reported to be beneficial in acute viral hepatitis.
To evaluate the efficacy of Kamalahain acute viral hepatitis in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
Fifty two patients with acute viral hepatitis were randomized to receive either Kamalahar 500 mg or a matched placebo three times a day for 15 days. Forty four patients (Kamalahar 20; placebo 24) completed the trial.
Improvement in clinical signs was more marked with Kamalahar compared to placebo. The fall in serum bilirubin (p
PubMed ID
8270290 View in PubMed
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Efficacy of an indigenous formulation in patients with bleeding piles: a preliminary clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194074
Source
Fitoterapia. 2000 Feb;71(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
P. Paranjpe
P. Patki
N. Joshi
Author Affiliation
Medinova Diagnostic Services, 1319, Jungli Maharaj Road, Pune 411005, India.
Source
Fitoterapia. 2000 Feb;71(1):41-5
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - drug therapy
Hemorrhoids - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Middle Aged
Phytotherapy
Plants, Medicinal - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The results of the clinical assessment of a multiherbal indigenous formulation on 22 patients with bleeding piles are reported.
PubMed ID
11449468 View in PubMed
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Environmental lead poisoning in three Montreal women of Asian Indian origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230170
Source
Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Sep 2;15(35):177-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1989

The genus Commiphora: a review of its traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124079
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jul 13;142(2):319-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-2012
Author
Tao Shen
Guo-Hui Li
Xiao-Ning Wang
Hong-Xiang Lou
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, 44 West Wenhua Road, Jinan 250012, PR China.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jul 13;142(2):319-30
Date
Jul-13-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Commiphora - chemistry
Humans
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Medicine, Chinese Traditional
Phytotherapy
Plant Bark
Plant Extracts - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Resins, Plant
Abstract
The resinous exudates of the Commiphora species, known as 'myrrh', are used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of trauma, arthritis, fractures and diseases caused by blood stagnation. Myrrh has also been used in the Ayurvedic medical system because of its therapeutic effects against inflammatory diseases, coronary artery diseases, gynecological disease, obesity, etc.
Based on a comprehensive review of traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological and toxicological data on the genus Commiphora, opportunities for the future research and development as well as the genus' therapeutic potential are analyzed.
Information on the Commiphora species was collected via electronic search (using Pubmed, SciFinder, Scirus, Google Scholar and Web of Science) and a library search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Furthermore, information also was obtained from some local books on ethnopharmacology. This paper covers the literature, primarily pharmacological, from 2000 to the end of December 2011.
The resinous exudates from the bark of plants of the genus Commiphora are important indigenous medicines, and have a long medicinal application for arthritis, hyperlipidemia, pain, wounds, fractures, blood stagnation, in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine and other indigenous medical systems. Phytochemical investigation of this genus has resulted in identification of more than 300 secondary metabolites. The isolated metabolites and crude extract have exhibited a wide of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effects, including antiproliferative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial. The bioactive steroids guggulsterones have attracted most attention for their potent hypolipidemic effect targeting farnesoid X receptor, as well as their potent inhibitory effects on tumor cells and anti-inflammatory efficiency.
The resins of Commiphora species have emerged as a good source of the traditional medicines for the treatment of inflammation, arthritis, obesity, microbial infection, wound, pain, fractures, tumor and gastrointestinal diseases. The resin of C. mukul in India and that of C. molmol in Egypt have been developed as anti-hyperlipidemia and antischistosomal agents. Pharmacological results have validated the use of this genus in the traditional medicines. Some bioassays are difficult to reproduce because the plant materials used have not been well identified, therefore analytical protocol and standardization of extracts should be established prior to biological evaluation. Stem, bark and leaf of this genus should receive more attention. Expansion of research materials would provide more opportunities for the discovery of new bioactive principles from the genus Commiphora.
PubMed ID
22626923 View in PubMed
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[Health food preparations have caused several cases of severe lead poisoning. At least four cases in Sweden after intake of an ayurvedic preparation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78075
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Mar 7-13;104(10):787-9
Publication Type
Article

Indigenous drugs and its effect on simple/low refractive errors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243040
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 1982 Jul;30(4):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982

23 records – page 1 of 3.