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Adherence and barriers to H. pylori treatment in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105338
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Megan Lefebvre
Hsiu-Ju Chang
Amy Morse
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Karen Jean Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is an emerging health concern to some northern Canadian Aboriginal communities and their clinicians. Clinicians in the north perceive H. pylori infection to be a major clinical problem because they find H. pylori infection in many patients evaluated for common stomach complaints, leading to frequent demand for treatment, which often fails. Moreover, public health authorities identified the need for information to develop locally appropriate H. pylori control strategies. We described adherence and identified barriers to completing treatment among H. pylori-positive participants in a community-based project inspired by local concerns about H. pylori infection risks.
In 2008, 110 H. pylori-positive participants (diagnosed by a breath test, histopathology and/or culture) of the Aklavik H. pylori project were randomised to standard-of-care or sequential treatment. We ascertained adherence by interviewing participants using a structured questionnaire. We estimated adherence frequencies as the proportion of participants who reported taking either 100% of doses (perfect adherence) or =80% of doses (good adherence). To compare the proportion with perfect or good adherence in subgroups, we report proportion differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Of 87 participants who were interviewed, 64% reported perfect adherence and 80% reported good adherence. We observed more frequent perfect adherence for: standard therapy (67%) versus sequential (62%); males (76%) versus females (52%); participants 40-77 years (79%) versus 17-39 (50%). Proportion differences were 5% (CI: -15, 25) for standard versus sequential therapy; 23% (CI: 4, 43) for male versus female; and 29% (CI: 10, 48) for 40-77 versus 15-39 years for perfect adherence. Of the 29 participants who reported poor adherence (
Notes
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PubMed ID
24416723 View in PubMed
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Adherence and discontinuation of adjuvant hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127527
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012 May;133(1):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Annette Wigertz
Johan Ahlgren
Marit Holmqvist
Tommy Fornander
Jan Adolfsson
Henrik Lindman
Leif Bergkvist
Mats Lambe
Author Affiliation
Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Annette.Wigertz@akademiska.se
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012 May;133(1):367-73
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - therapeutic use
Aromatase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Maintenance Chemotherapy
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - prevention & control
Neoplasms, Hormone-Dependent - prevention & control
Sweden
Tamoxifen - therapeutic use
Abstract
Adherence to long-term pharmacological treatment for chronic conditions is often less than optimal. Till date, a limited number of population-based studies have assessed adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in breast cancer, a therapy with proven benefits in terms of reductions of recurrence and mortality. We aimed to examine rates of adherence and early discontinuation in Sweden where prescribed medications are subsidized for all residents and made available at reduced out-of-pocket costs. Individual-level data were obtained from Regional Clinical Quality Breast Cancer Registers, the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, and several other population-based registers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze factors associated with adherence to prescribed medication for a period of 3 years. Between January 1 and December 31, 2005, 1,741 patients in central Sweden were identified with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, and at least one prescription dispensation of either tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor. Of these women, 1,193 (69%) were fully adherent to therapy for 3 years (medication possession ratio of 80% or higher and a maximum of 180 days between refills). During the 3-year follow-up, 215 women (12%) had prematurely discontinued therapy. Adherence was positively associated with younger age, large tumor size, being married, and being born in the Nordic countries, while no clear association was observed with education or income. During the 3 years of follow-up, 31% of women were non-adherent to therapy. Further efforts must be undertaken to promote adherence over the entire recommended treatment period.
PubMed ID
22286315 View in PubMed
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Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Nov;51(11):1326-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Palle Bager
Mette Julsgaard
Thea Vestergaard
Lisbet Ambrosius Christensen
Jens Frederik Dahlerup
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Nov;51(11):1326-31
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - classification - therapeutic use
Decision Making
Denmark
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Health Care - standards
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tertiary Care Centers
Young Adult
Abstract
In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), adherence to both medical treatment and other aspects of care has a substantial impact on the course of the disease. Most studies of medical adherence have reported that 30-45% of patients with IBD were non-adherent. Our study aimed to investigate the different aspects of adherence and to identify predictors of non-adherence, including the quality of care, for outpatients with IBD.
An anonymous electronic questionnaire was used to investigate different aspects of adherence, the quality of care, patient involvement and shared decision making among 377 IBD outpatients.
Three hundred (80%) filled in the questionnaire. The overall adherence rate was 93%. Young age (
PubMed ID
27311071 View in PubMed
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[Adherence of patients with stable angina to treatment with trimetazidine MR and frequency of emergency medical care: results of the EFFECT study].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118141
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(11):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M G Glezer
R T Saigitov
Source
Kardiologiia. 2012;52(11):4-11
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina, Stable - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Drug Monitoring - methods
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Emergencies - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Episode of Care
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Therapeutic Equivalency
Treatment Outcome
Trimetazidine - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Vasodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
The adherence of patients with stable angina to antianginal therapy is the key factor of controlling the disease. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship of adherence of patients with stable angina to treatment with trimetazidine modified release (MR) with frequency (risk) of emergency medical care. We consistently included in the study patients with stable angina in primary health care. The results of treatment for 16 weeks were monitored at patients with angina attacks three times per week or more, use of short nitrate and treatment with generic trimetazidine. To strengthen the antianginal therapy generic was replaced with original trimetazidine MR. Adherence is considered relatively high while taking 80-120% of the recommended dose of the drug (70 mg/day). The effectiveness of treatment evaluated by the frequency of emergency hospitalizations and/or ambulance calls because of the pain, discomfort, tightness in the chest or ischemic changes on the electrocardiogram. 870 patients were included in the study, the results of treatment in 185 were assessed. Patients with a relatively high adherence to trimetazidine MR (n=151) were used (median) 99% (98, 104), with low (<80%, n=34) adherence - 67% (49, 76) of the recommended dose of the drug. During the study period, the primary end point is fixed in 7 (21%) patients with low and in 18 (12%) - with relatively high adherence (p=0.182). The number of angina attacks, having necessitated taking short-nitrate, decreased in the groups, respectively, with 5 (3; 10) and 6 (4; 10) to 2 (1; 3) per week (p=0.791). Thus, replacing generic trimetazidine with original trimetazidine MR in patients with a high frequency of angina attacks can achieve significant antianginal effect. Adherence of patients to the reception of the drug by an average 1/3 below the recommended amount does not affect the risk of emergency hospitalizations and/or ambulance calls for 16 weeks.
PubMed ID
23237390 View in PubMed
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Adherence, persistence and switch rates for anticholinergic drugs used for overactive bladder in women: data from the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Oct;92(10):1208-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Siri A Mauseth
Svetlana Skurtveit
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Oct;92(10):1208-15
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benzhydryl Compounds - therapeutic use
Benzofurans - therapeutic use
Cholinergic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Cresols - therapeutic use
Databases, Pharmaceutical
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway
Phenylpropanolamine - therapeutic use
Pyrrolidines - therapeutic use
Quinuclidines - therapeutic use
Tetrahydroisoquinolines - therapeutic use
Urinary Bladder, Overactive - drug therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the pattern of use of anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder among women in Norway with regard to persistence, adherence and switch rates.
Observational study.
Data from the Norwegian Prescription Database on prescriptions for tolterodine, solifenacin, darifenacin and fesoterodine filled in Norwegian pharmacies from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010.
Data from the database were analysed at an individual level, and drug persistence, discontinuation rates and switch rates during a follow-up period of 365 days after the first prescription were calculated.
Overall 1-year persistence for new users was 38.0%. Within the same period, a total of 10.3% switched from the index drug to another drug in the same group, whereas 51.7% discontinued without switching. Users of solifenacin and tolterodine were somewhat more persistent than users of darifenacin and fesoterodine. Persistence was lowest (20.9%) in the age group 18-39 years, increased with age and was highest in the age groups 70-79 years and 80 years and above (43.5 and 43.3%, respectively). In total, 31.9% filled only one prescription of the drug and, of these, only one of four women switched to another drug. The proportion who were adherent during treatment was 60.4%.
The discontinuation rate for anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder in women is high. The reasons why patients stop using them remain obscure but could be related both to a limited clinical effect and an unacceptable adverse effect burden.
PubMed ID
23763552 View in PubMed
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Adherence, preference, and satisfaction of postmenopausal women taking denosumab or alendronate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140933
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1725-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
D L Kendler
M R McClung
N. Freemantle
M. Lillestol
A H Moffett
J. Borenstein
S. Satram-Hoang
Y-C Yang
P. Kaur
D. Macarios
S. Siddhanti
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, 600-1285 West Broadway, V6H 3X8 Vancouver, BC, Canada. kendler@ca.inter.net
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1725-35
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Alendronate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
British Columbia
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this study, 250 women with osteoporosis were randomized to 12 months with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly, then crossed over to the other treatment. The primary endpoint, treatment adherence at 12 months, was 76.6% for alendronate and 87.3% for denosumab.
The purpose of this study is to evaluate treatment adherence with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly.
In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, 2-year, crossover study, 250 postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density received denosumab or alendronate for 12 months, then the other treatment for 12 months. The alendronate bottle had a medication event monitoring system cap to monitor administration dates. Definitions were as follows: compliance, receiving both denosumab doses 6 (± 1) months apart or 80-100% of alendronate doses; persistence, receiving both denosumab doses and completing the month 12 visit within the visit window or = 2 alendronate doses in the final month; adherence, achieving both compliance and persistence. This report includes data from the first 12 months.
The primary study endpoint, adherence in the first 12 months, was 76.6% (95/124) for alendronate and 87.3% (110/126) for denosumab. Risk ratios for denosumab compared with alendronate at 12 months were 0.58 (p = 0.043) for non-adherence, 0.48 (p = 0.014) for non-compliance, and 0.54 (p = 0.049) for non-persistence. Subject ratings for treatment necessity, preference, and satisfaction were significantly greater for denosumab and ratings for treatment bother were significantly greater for alendronate. Adverse events were reported by 64.1% of alendronate-treated subjects and 72.0% of denosumab-treated subjects (p = 0.403). The most common adverse events were arthralgia, back pain, pain in extremity, cough, and headache (each in
PubMed ID
20827547 View in PubMed
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The adherence support gap: the 'ideal' versus 'reality' of antiretroviral adherence support provided by HIV health providers in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150598
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2009 Jun;43(6):1036-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Laura Y Park-Wyllie
Derek Kam
Ahmed M Bayoumi
Author Affiliation
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. parkwylliel@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2009 Jun;43(6):1036-44
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Attitude of Health Personnel
Data Collection
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Physicians - organization & administration - psychology
Quality of Health Care
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Guidelines suggest that clinicians should provide their patients with antiretroviral adherence support, but there is uncertainty about the types of adherence support clinicians think are important, the methods they use to provide adherence support, and the barriers they face in providing such support in clinical practice.
To study clinician perspectives on the importance of different antiretroviral adherence support activities and compare these with clinicians' self-reported actual adherence support practices.
From March to August 2005, surveys were mailed to physicians, pharmacists, and nurses who provide care to HIV patients in Ontario, Canada. The 84-item survey asked providers to rate how necessary it was to provide 30 types of adherence support activities and how frequently they actually provided each of the types of adherence support. From this, we assessed healthcare provider perceptions of best or ideal practices in supporting medication adherence and actual or usual care in adherence support provision. We also examined whether an adherence support gap existed between the provision of best practice adherence support and actual adherence support in clinical practice.
One hundred sixty-nine of 300 mailed surveys were returned, for a response rate of 56%. Respondents were highly specialized in HIV care and nearly all practiced in urban settings. Respondents indicated that most of the surveyed adherence support activities should be provided to all patients. However, most clinicians did not actually provide these adherence supports to their patients to the extent that they desired. We calculated an adherence support gap that ranged from 31% to 75% across the different types of adherence support activities.
We observed important adherence support gaps between ideal best practices in the provision of adherence support and actual provision of adherence support in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
19491319 View in PubMed
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Adherence, therapeutic intensity, and the number of dispensed drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131359
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Dec;20(12):1255-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Bo Hovstadius
Göran Petersson
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. bo.hovstadius@pwc.se
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Dec;20(12):1255-61
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods
Prescription Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Registries
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate non-adherence in relation to the therapeutic intensity (TI) and the number of dispensed drugs per individual and study whether the TI can be used as an estimator of non-adherence with an increasing number of drugs.
The study comprised an individual-based register of all dispensed outpatient prescriptions in Sweden in 2006, including 6.2 million individuals. The applied definition of drug was the chemical entity or substance comprising the fifth level in the World Health Organisation's Anatomic, Therapeutic, Chemical classification. The defined daily dosage per individual during 12 months was applied as an indicator of the TI.
We found a positive linear relation between the TI and the increasing number of dispensed drugs per individual, both for men and women. We found a slightly diminishing TI with an increasing number of drugs only for the age groups above 70 years, at a level above 13 drugs per individual.
The linear relationship between the TI and the increasing number of dispensed drugs per individual provides poor support for using decreasing TI as an estimator of non-adherence. The low rate of cost-related non-adherence in Sweden might contribute to explaining the linear relationship.
PubMed ID
21913278 View in PubMed
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Adherence to antidepressants among women and men described with trajectory models: a Swedish longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280407
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Nov;72(11):1381-1389
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Ann-Charlotte Mårdby
Linus Schiöler
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Pernilla Bjerkeli
Eva Lesén
Anna K Jönsson
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Nov;72(11):1381-1389
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Citalopram - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study are to analyse adherence to antidepressant treatment over 2 years in Sweden among women and men who initiated treatment with citalopram and to identify groups at risk of non-adherence using trajectory models.
The study population, including individuals 18-85 years who initiated citalopram use between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, was identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and followed for 2 years. Adherence was estimated with continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and group-based trajectory modelling, a method which describes adherence patterns over time by estimating trajectories of adherence and the individual's probability of belonging to a specific trajectory.
The study population included 54,248 individuals, 64 % women. Mean CMA was 52 % among women and 50 % among men (p 
PubMed ID
27488388 View in PubMed
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Adherence to antiretroviral medications among persons who inject drugs in transitional, low and middle income countries: an international systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268956
Source
AIDS Behav. 2015 Apr;19(4):575-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Jonathan Feelemyer
Don Des Jarlais
Kamyar Arasteh
Anneli Uusküla
Source
AIDS Behav. 2015 Apr;19(4):575-83
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Brazil - epidemiology
China - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Drug Users - statistics & numerical data
Estonia - epidemiology
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
India - epidemiology
Indonesia - epidemiology
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Russia - epidemiology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
Adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication is vital to reducing morbidity and mortality among HIV positive persons. People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for HIV infection in transitional/low/middle income countries (TLMIC). We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting adherence to ART among persons with active injection drug use and/or histories of injection drug use in TLMIC. Meta-regression was performed to examine relationships between location, adherence measurements, and follow-up period. Fifteen studies were included from seven countries. Adherence levels ranged from 33 to 97 %; mean weighted adherence was 72 %. ART adherence was associated with different methods of measuring adherence and studies conducted in Eastern Europe and East Asia. The great heterogeneity observed precludes generalization to TLMIC as a whole. Given the critical importance of ART adherence more research is needed on ART adherence among PWID in TLMIC, including the use of standardized methods for reporting adherence to ART.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25331268 View in PubMed
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132 records – page 1 of 14.