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578 records – page 1 of 58.

A 5-y follow-up of the radiation exposure to in-room personnel during cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224582
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Montreal Heart Institute, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Personnel, Hospital
Quebec
Radiation Dosage
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Abstract
This study documents the radiation doses received by all in-room personnel of three cardiac catheterization laboratories where more than 15,000 cardiac procedures have been performed over a 5-y period. It is shown that all in-room personnel was exposed to a body dose equivalent well below any regulatory limits. However, some workers may have exceeded the occupational 150 mSv y-1 recommended limit for the lens of the eye. The physicians-in-training and the staff physicians are the two groups more likely to reach this limit. It is also demonstrated that a low correlation exists between the annual number of procedures and the annual head dose equivalent of a physician, but more variation is likely to originate from his/her working attitude and techniques. The mean dose equivalent at the collar level of the physicians is estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 mSv per procedure.
PubMed ID
1727405 View in PubMed
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[Abuse of drugs by hospital personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102446
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1965
Author
Ettlinger R, Rylander R.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70.
Date
Jun-30-1965
Language
Swedish
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital*
Substance-Related Disorders/rehabilitation*
Sweden
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[Abuse of drugs by hospital personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108867
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1965
Author
R. Ettlinger
R. Rylander
Source
Lakartidningen. 1965 Jun 30;62(26):2065-70
Date
Jun-30-1965
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Substance-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Sweden
PubMed ID
5877221 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic organization of residency programs: the evaluation of the effect of "service" responsibilities upon the residency program; the influence of personal responsibility of a "chief" for the resident compared with the "system" approach to resident education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111652
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1966
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):760-2
Date
Oct-8-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Staff, Hospital
Universities
PubMed ID
5926143 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic organization of residency programs: the evaluation of the effect of "service" responsibilities upon the residency program; the influence of personal responsibility of a "chief" for the resident compared with the "system" approach to resident education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111653
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):759
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-1966
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Oct 8;95(15):759
Date
Oct-8-1966
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitalization
Humans
Internship and Residency
Medical Staff, Hospital
PubMed ID
5926142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of RNFA by surgeons and staff overwhelming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203416
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
S. Carver
K. Allen
Author Affiliation
Brantford General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - trends
Physician-Nurse Relations
PubMed ID
9883118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of patient interviews and estimates by clinical staff in determining medication compliance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244767
Source
Soc Sci Med E. 1981 Feb;15(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1981

Achievement of objectives: internal medicine fourth year clinical clerkship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227292
Source
Med Teach. 1991;13(1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H. Ho Ping Kong
K. Robb
D. Cleave-Hogg
K. Evans
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Toronto Western Hospital, Canada.
Source
Med Teach. 1991;13(1):29-37
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Clinical Competence
Decision Making
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Medical Staff, Hospital - standards
Middle Aged
Physician-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Abstract
The clinical clerkship in Canadian Medical Schools is intended to provide senior medical students with opportunities to gain practical knowledge of clinical medicine, develop technical skills, learn to use judgement and experience first-hand clinical decision making. Assessment of rotations in internal medicine were undertaken in order to understand more fully the nature of medical clerkship experiences. We found that medical clerks in our programme were exposed to a high proportion of undifferentiated problems and an adequate case mix. They performed a wide range of technical procedures. There were, however, certain gaps in the clerks' experiences both in the specialty areas, and in therapeutic and technical procedures. Recognition of these gaps in the clerkship experiences suggest that further deliberation of goals and objectives is required and issues of achievement of competencies need to be addressed.
PubMed ID
1865796 View in PubMed
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[Activities and staffing in intensive care units in Norway--still need of better registration].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195091
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
A. Fredriksen
Author Affiliation
Helsepolitisk avdeling Den norske laegeforening Postboks 1152 Sentrum 0107 Oslo. audun.fredriksen@legeforeningen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):694-7
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - utilization
Medical Staff, Hospital - education - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Standards in Intensive Care Medicine were approved by the Board of the Norwegian Medical Association in 1997. Their purpose is to clarify issues of responsibility, accountability and management in intensive care units. It also gives recommendations on management, staffing, education and resources.
In order to obtain a reference point for any future assessment of the impact of the Standards document, a survey was carried out, addressing work load, medical staff, and questions of accountability, responsibility and cooperation.
16 hospitals responded (76%). The results seem to indicate that medical staff in relation to work load is smaller than recommended. It also seems that junior doctors only to a small extent are present in the intensive care units during ordinary working hours, and consequently have little opportunity to learn from working with experienced colleagues. However, both conclusions, especially the first one, are not entirely reliable, as close examination of the answers indicate that important concepts concerning the description of work load and staffing are poorly defined, and that the monitoring of work load is insufficient.
It is concluded that staffing and work load in intensive care units are still insufficiently defined and monitored. The training environment for specialists is not optimal.
PubMed ID
11293351 View in PubMed
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Actual clinical leadership: a shadowing study of charge nurses and doctors on-call in the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298343
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-08-2019
Author
Sissel Eikeland Husebø
Øystein Evjen Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Quality and Health Technology, Faculty of Health Science, University of Stavanger, 4036, Stavanger, Norway. sissel.i.husebo@uis.no.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2019 Jan 08; 27(1):2
Date
Jan-08-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Nursing, Supervisory
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Abstract
The provision of safe, high quality healthcare in the Emergency Department (ED) requires frontline healthcare personnel with sufficient competence in clinical leadership. However, healthcare education curriculum infrequently features learning about clinical leadership, and there is an absence of experienced doctors and nurses as role models in EDs for younger and less experienced doctors and nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the activities performed by clinical leaders and to identify similarities and differences between the activities performed by charge nurses and those performed by doctors on-call in the Emergency Department after completion of a Clinical Leadership course.
A qualitative exploratory design was chosen. Nine clinical leaders in the ED were shadowed. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis.
The analysis revealed seven themes: receiving an overview of the team and patients and planning the shift; ensuring resources; monitoring and ensuring appropriate patient flow; monitoring and securing information flow; securing patient care and treatment; securing and assuring the quality of diagnosis and treatment of patient; and securing the prioritization of patients. The last two themes were exclusive to doctors on-call, while the theme "securing patient care and treatment" was exclusive to charge nurses.
Charge nurses and doctors on-call perform multitasking and complement each other as clinical leaders in the ED. The findings in this study provide new insights into how clinical leadership is performed by charge nurses and doctors on-call in the ED, but also the similarities and differences that exist in clinical leadership performance between the two professions. Clinical leadership is necessary to the provision of safe, high quality care and treatment for patients with acute health needs, as well as the coordination of healthcare services in the ED. More evaluation studies of this Clinical Leadership course would be valuable.
PubMed ID
30621752 View in PubMed
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578 records – page 1 of 58.