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Accuracy of Canadian health administrative databases in identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a validation study using the medical records of rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114676
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jessica Widdifield
Sasha Bernatsky
J Michael Paterson
Karen Tu
Ryan Ng
J Carter Thorne
Janet E Pope
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Mining - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - statistics & numerical data
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health administrative data can be a valuable tool for disease surveillance and research. Few studies have rigorously evaluated the accuracy of administrative databases for identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to validate administrative data algorithms to identify RA patients in Ontario, Canada.
We performed a retrospective review of a random sample of 450 patients from 18 rheumatology clinics. Using rheumatologist-reported diagnosis as the reference standard, we tested and validated different combinations of physician billing, hospitalization, and pharmacy data.
One hundred forty-nine rheumatology patients were classified as having RA and 301 were classified as not having RA based on our reference standard definition (study RA prevalence 33%). Overall, algorithms that included physician billings had excellent sensitivity (range 94-100%). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were modest to excellent and increased when algorithms included multiple physician claims or specialist claims. The addition of RA medications did not significantly improve algorithm performance. The algorithm of "(1 hospitalization RA code ever) OR (3 physician RA diagnosis codes [claims] with =1 by a specialist in a 2-year period)" had a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 85%, PPV of 76%, and negative predictive value of 98%. Most RA patients (84%) had an RA diagnosis code present in the administrative data within ±1 year of a rheumatologist's documented diagnosis date.
We demonstrated that administrative data can be used to identify RA patients with a high degree of accuracy. RA diagnosis date and disease duration are fairly well estimated from administrative data in jurisdictions of universal health care insurance.
PubMed ID
23592598 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with high-dose ribavirin: evidence from the Toronto outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164482
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Matthew P Muller
Linda Dresser
Janet Raboud
Allison McGeer
Elizabeth Rea
Susan E Richardson
Tony Mazzulli
Mark Loeb
Marie Louie
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mmuller@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Anemia - chemically induced
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bradycardia - chemically induced
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Magnesium Deficiency - chemically induced
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Ribavirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - drug therapy - epidemiology
Tetany - chemically induced
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To distinguish adverse events related to ribavirin therapy from those attributable to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and to determine the rate of potential ribavirin-related adverse events.
Retrospective cohort study.
Hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
A cohort of 306 patients with confirmed or probable SARS, 183 of whom received ribavirin and 123 of whom did not, between February 23, 2003, and July 1, 2003. Of the 183 treated patients, 155 (85%) received very high-dose ribavirin; the other 28 treated patients received lower-dose regimens.
Data on all patients with SARS admitted to hospitals in Toronto were abstracted from charts and electronic databases onto a standardized form by trained research nurses. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between ribavirin use and each adverse event (progressive anemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, bradycardia, transaminitis, and hyperamylasemia) after adjusting for SARS-related prognostic factors and corticosteroid use. In the primary logistic regression analysis, ribavirin use was strongly associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] 3.0, 99% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-6.1, p
PubMed ID
17381375 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the diagnoses of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a Danish hospital information system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212777
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Feb;31(2):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
K. Fonager
H T Sørensen
S N Rasmussen
J. Møller-Petersen
M. Vyberg
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Internal Medicine M, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1996 Feb;31(2):154-9
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Community - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Our aim was to estimate the completeness-that is, whether all patients were included in the system-and the validity-that is, whether the diagnostic criteria were fulfilled for the patients registered-of the diagnoses of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a Danish hospital system.
Information in a regional hospital system, in the County of North Jutland, Denmark, was compared with hospital records and information in a pathology system.
The analysis of the completeness included 143 patients with Crohn's disease and 285 patients with ulcerative colitis. The completeness of the regional hospital system using the pathology system as a reference standard was 94% for both diseases. The analysis of the validity included 281 patients registered as having Crohn's disease and 506 patients registered as having ulcerative colitis. The validity of the two diagnoses was 97% and 90%, respectively.
The regional hospital system showed few misclassifications of the diagnoses of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Thus the nationwide hospital system (based on the regional hospital systems) may provide a unique study base for future research.
PubMed ID
8658038 View in PubMed
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BERTE--a database for children with congenital heart defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36040
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1994;14:98-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P S Hagemo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, National Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1994;14:98-101
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automatic Data Processing
Child
Child, Preschool
Computers
Heart Defects, Congenital - classification - surgery
Humans
Infant
Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - statistics & numerical data
Software
Abstract
To secure the follow-up of children with congenital heart defects in Norway the Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology has developed a tailor-made database. This also simplifies the regular flow of information about these patients both inside the hospital and between the hospital and the others who are in charge of the patient care on various levels.
PubMed ID
10163704 View in PubMed
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Clinical information technology in hospitals: a comparison between the state of Iowa and two provinces in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174075
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2005 Sep;74(9):719-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Mirou Jaana
Marcia M Ward
Guy Paré
Douglas S Wakefield
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Management and Policy, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon. mirou.jaana@aub.edu.lb
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2005 Sep;74(9):719-31
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Technology - classification - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iowa
Medical Informatics Applications
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Systems Integration
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
Despite the growing interest in adopting information technology (IT) in healthcare, the degree of technology sophistication varies among healthcare organizations. Changes in the health care sector and continuous pressure to improve the quality of care have driven the evolution of IT in hospitals. This paper provides an overview of clinical IT sophistication in a sample of U.S. hospitals, and compares clinical IT capacities in this sample with a sample of Canadian hospitals. The instrument used for the comparison measures three clinical dimensions of IT sophistication: functional sophistication, technological sophistication and integration level. Clinical areas that were considered include patient management, patient care activities and clinical support activities. The comparison between hospitals in Iowa and Canada shows differences in clinical IT sophistication between the two settings. Hospitals in Iowa appear to have more technologies but fewer computerized processes and integration of patient management activities. Technological sophistication however, was low in both samples. Our findings confirm the construct validity of the measurement instrument and show initial evidence of its generalizability. More initiatives using the instrument would lead to enhancement in IT assessment tools that can be used for evaluation of IT in relation to patient management and quality outcomes.
PubMed ID
15990357 View in PubMed
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[Danish General Medicine Database--future tool! The Danish Society of General Medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157841
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Mar 17;170(12):1013
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-2008
Author
Henrik Schroll
Bo Christensen
John Sahl Andersen
Jens Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Den Almenmedicinske Kvalitets Enhed, J. B. Winsløws Vej 9A, DK-5000 Odense C. hschroll@dak-e.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Mar 17;170(12):1013
Date
Mar-17-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data - trends
PubMed ID
18397631 View in PubMed
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The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. History, data collection and validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71931
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2001 May;48(2):91-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
N. Koch-Henriksen
S. Rasmussen
E. Stenager
M. Madsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, National Institute of Public Health, Department of Neurology, Aalborg Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2001 May;48(2):91-4
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Multiple Sclerosis - classification - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Abstract
The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry was formally established in 1956 but started operating in 1949 with a nationwide prevalence survey. Since then, the Registry has continued collecting data on new and old cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) or suspected MS from multiple sources. The Registry reclassifies cases according to standardized diagnostic criteria (currently those of Poser et al). A total of 14,441 cases fulfilling the diagnostic criteria had been registered at the most recently completed follow-up by 1 January 1997; 10,851 had onset from 1948 to 1996 and 3560 before 1948. The completeness has formerly been estimated at about 90%, higher for cohorts with older onset and lower for cohorts with onset close to follow-up. The estimated validity of the diagnosis for autopsy cases classified as definite MS in the Registry is 94%. A long-term nationwide Registry has proved to be a valuable instrument for monitoring incidence and prevalence, analysing survival, performing genetic analysis, providing unselected patient samples for clinical analyses, performing case-control studies and prospective studies and estimating the need for treatment and care.
PubMed ID
11414126 View in PubMed
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Depression in patients with advanced illness: an examination of Ontario complex continuing care using the Minimum Data Set 2.0.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169916
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2005 Jun;3(2):99-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Andrea Gruneir
Trevor Frise Smith
John Hirdes
Roy Cameron
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2005 Jun;3(2):99-105
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Terminally Ill - psychology
Abstract
In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression, its recognition, and its treatment in continuing care patients with advanced illness (AI).
All data were obtained from the Ontario (Canada) provincially-mandated MDS 2.0 form for chronic care. Of 3,801 patients, 524 met our empiric definition of AI, which was predicated on a previously validated algorithm. The MDS-embedded Depression Rating Scale (DRS) was used to measure psychological well-being and a score of 3 or greater indicated potential depression.
Twenty-nine percent of patients with AI scored greater than 3, making them nearly twice as likely to be potentially depressed as other patients (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5-2.2). Despite this patients with AI were less likely to have received antidepressants (28.9% vs. 38.2%), even among those with a diagnosis (45.3% vs. 58.4%). Using logistic regression, correlates of potential depression were identified and surprisingly patients with cancer were substantially less likely to be depressed (AOR 0.37, 95% CI 0.2-0.6). Further investigation revealed that cancer patients were more likely to be treated for depression and to be recognized as being within the terminal phase of illness.
These findings suggest that a high proportion of terminally ill patients had unmet needs for psychological support. As well, they suggest that cancer patients received better targeted end-of-life care, which resulted in an overall decrease in psychological distress when compared to other patients with similarly advanced illness.
PubMed ID
16594434 View in PubMed
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[Development and use of a database for gastroenterologic endoscopy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223942
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 30;112(11):1441-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1992
Author
L. Aabakken
B. Hofstad
J. Westerheim
C. Sandvik
S. Larsen
M. Osnes
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for fordøyelsessykdommer, Medisinsk klinikk, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 30;112(11):1441-5
Date
Apr-30-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Database Management Systems
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Norway
Abstract
With no commercially available endoscopy database manager available, a standalone system for gastroenterological endoscopy departments has been developed since 1985 through joint efforts of gastroenterologists and dedicated programmers. The present system was implemented for daily use January 1989 and, to date, approximately 19,000 examinations have been recorded. Nurses and office assistants carry out administrative work, but the physician enters the endoscopic data, partly as free text, partly as structured data via automated menus and a mouse. In addition to the immediate printout of the result, valuable data are stored in the computer for administrative and research purposes. Mean data entering time for the physician was four minutes 17 seconds, and altogether eight minutes 40 seconds was spent on the computer system for each patient served.
PubMed ID
1631816 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic coding accuracy for traumatic spinal cord injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154858
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):367-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
E M Hagen
T. Rekand
N E Gilhus
M. Gronning
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ellen.merete.hagen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Spinal Cord. 2009 May;47(5):367-71
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Forms and Records Control - methods
Hospitals, University
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - utilization
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Spinal Cord Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Retrospective register study enhanced and verified by medical records.
To study whether electronic searches of discharge diagnosis are valid for epidemiological research of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), using the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).
Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
We identified all hospital admissions with discharge codes suggesting a traumatic SCI from ICD-8 to ICD-10 in the electronic database at Haukeland University Hospital, and ascertained the cases by reviewing all hospital records.
1080 patients had an ICD diagnostic code suggesting a traumatic SCI. Only 260 were verified when reviewing the hospital records. The ICD-10 codes had superior positive predictive values (PPV) and likelihood ratios (LR+) compared with the codes from ICD-8 and ICD-9. Combining seven codes from ICD-10 (S14.0, S14.1, S24.0, S24.1, S34.1, S34.3, T91.3) gave the highest sensitivity (0.83), specificity (0.97), PPV (0.88) and LR+ (30.23).
Obtaining hospital discharge diagnoses solely from electronic databases overestimates the incidence of traumatic SCI. Identification of patients using ICD-10 codes is more complicated because acute traumatic SCI and traumatic SCI sequelae are listed with several codes. The latest ICD version proved to be most reliable when identifying patients with traumatic SCI. However, ICD data cannot be trusted without extensive validity checks for either research or for health planning and administration.
PubMed ID
18839007 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.