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415 records – page 1 of 42.

25 years of pharmacoepidemiologic innovation: the Saskatchewan health administrative databases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138275
Source
J Popul Ther Clin Pharmacol. 2011;18(2):e245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011

The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Accessing health care utilization databases for health research: a Canadian longitudinal study on aging feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147705
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Parminder S Raina
Susan A Kirkland
Christina Wolfson
Karen Szala-Meneok
Lauren E Griffith
Homa Keshavarz
Jennifer Uniat
Linda Furlini
Camille L Angus
Geoff Strople
Amélie Pelletier
Author Affiliation
McMaster Evidence-based Practice Center, McMaster University, Canada. praina@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Feasibility Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Medical Record Linkage
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
ABSTRACTOne of the keys to the success of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) will be the leveraging of secondary data sources, particularly health care utilization (HCU) data. To examine the practical, methodological, and ethical aspects of accessing HCU data, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 data stewards and privacy commissioners/ombudsmen from across Canada. Study participants indicated that obtaining permission to access HCU data is generally possible; however, they noted that this will be a complex and lengthy process requiring considerable and meticulous preparatory work to ensure proper documentation and compliance with jurisdictional variations along legislative and policy lines.
PubMed ID
19860983 View in PubMed
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The accordance of diagnoses in a computerized sick-leave register with doctor's certificates and medical records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225797
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):148-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
L O Ljungdahl
P. Bjurulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1991 Sep;19(3):148-53
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Diagnosis
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
A register has been built for planned epidemiological studies of sick-leave, containing all cases exceeding 6 days in a population of 184,000, over a period of 3 years. The diagnoses were coded from medical certificates. To assess the quality of this information this study reviews the medical certificates of 2,364 cases. In 299 cases the corresponding medical records are reviewed and independent diagnoses made. The coding and entering of data into the register is correct in 98% of cases. The independently-made diagnoses match exactly the ones registered in 50% of cases. When grouping the diagnoses into 39 groups, the match on group level is 72%. Ten percentage points of the mismatch are caused by specified overlaps between groups. The remaining 18% mismatch is caused mainly by different interpretations or unspecific labelling of the disease states, not so much by them being obscure in themselves or by doctor covering up unpleasant diagnoses.
PubMed ID
1796246 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide exposure and incidence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93773
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 May 1;122(9):2094-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2008
Author
Olesen Pelle Thonning
Olsen Anja
Frandsen Henrik
Frederiksen Kirsten
Overvad Kim
Tjønneland Anne
Author Affiliation
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark. petol@food.dtu.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2008 May 1;122(9):2094-100
Date
May-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - adverse effects
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Epoxy Compounds - blood
Female
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed in several foods during high-temperature processing. So far, epidemiological studies have not shown any association between human cancer risk and dietary exposure to acrylamide. The purpose of this study was to conduct a nested case control study within a prospective cohort study on the association between breast cancer and exposure to acrylamide using biomarkers. N-terminal hemoglobin adduct levels of acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide in red blood cells were analyzed (by LC/MS/MS) as biomarkers of exposure on 374 breast cancer cases and 374 controls from a cohort of postmenopausal women. The adduct levels of acrylamide and glycidamide were similar in cases and controls, with smokers having much higher levels (approximately 3 times) than nonsmokers. No association was seen between acrylamide-hemoglobin levels and breast cancer risk neither unadjusted nor adjusted for the potential confounders HRT duration, parity, BMI, alcohol intake and education. After adjustment for smoking behavior, however, a positive association was seen between acrylamide-hemoglobin levels and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer with an estimated incidence rate ratio (95% CI) of 2.7 (1.1-6.6) per 10-fold increase in acrylamide-hemoglobin level. A weak association between glycidamide hemoglobin levels and incidence of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer was also found, this association, however, entirely disappeared when acrylamide and glycidamide hemoglobin levels were mutually adjusted.
PubMed ID
18183576 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction. A feasibility study using record-linkage of routinely collected health information to create a two-year patient profile. Manitoba, 1984-85 and 1985-86.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103865
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(4):305-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Johansen
P. Paddon
K. Chagani
D. Hamilton
L. Kiss
S. Krawchuk
Author Affiliation
System Development Division, Statistics Canada.
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(4):305-25
Date
1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Feasibility Studies
Female
Heart Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Sex Factors
Abstract
Manitoba's hospital separations and physician medical files were linked for the fiscal years 1984-85 and 1985-86. The result was a study file consisting of records for 5,293 males and 3,143 females, who, during this period, suffered an Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI), commonly called a heart attack. Merging the two types of files created a comprehensive data base for these AMI victims. The Manitoba age-sex standardized AMI rate was 38.0 per 10,000 population. Age-specific rates were higher for males than for females for all age groups. Hospitalized cases accounted for 7,201 individuals or 85.4% of AMI victims. Age-sex standardized rates of hospitalization per 10,000 population ranged from 27.1 in the Central region to 36.0 in the Westman region. The Manitoba age-specific rates of hospitalization for males in the 35-54 and 55-64 age groups were about three times the female rates for the same age groups. One quarter of AMI hospitalized victims died in hospital. The Manitoba age-specific death rates for males in the 35-54, 55-64 and 65-74 age groups were double the rates for females in the same age groups. Of the 8,436 AMI victims under study, 86.4% had at least one other concurrent medical condition such as angina, other forms of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, or hypertension. Of AMI victims, 93.8% underwent at least one of the following procedures: coronary artery bypass surgery, angiogram, electrocardiogram, cardiac catheterization, arteriography, or blood cholesterol testing. A higher percentage of procedures was performed on males than on females.
Notes
Erratum In: Health Rep 1991;3(1):97
PubMed ID
2101289 View in PubMed
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Adherence to beta-blocker therapy under drug cost-sharing in patients with and without acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162000
Source
Am J Manag Care. 2007 Aug;13(8):445-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Sebastian Schneeweiss
Amanda R Patrick
Malcolm Maclure
Colin R Dormuth
Robert J Glynn
Author Affiliation
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont St (Ste 3030), Boston, MA 02120, USA. schneeweiss@post.harvard.edu
Source
Am J Manag Care. 2007 Aug;13(8):445-52
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - economics - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cost Sharing
Deductibles and Coinsurance
Diabetes Complications
Female
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - economics
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Fees
Vascular Diseases
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of patient copayment and coinsurance policies on adherence to therapy with beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta-blockers) and on the rate of initiation of beta-blocker therapy after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based natural experiment.
Three sequential cohorts included British Columbia residents age 66 years and older who initiated beta-blocker therapy during time intervals with full drug coverage (2001), a $10 or $25 copayment (2002), and 25% coinsurance (2003-2004). We used linked data on all prescription drug dispensings, physician services, and hospitalizations. Follow-up of each cohort was 9 months after the policy changes.
We measured the proportion of subjects in each cohort who were adherent to beta-blocker therapy over time, with adherence defined as having >80% of days covered. We also measured the proportion of patients initiating beta-blocker therapy after acute MI. Policy effects were evaluated using multivariable regression.
Adherence to beta-blocker therapy was marginally reduced as a consequence of the copayment policy (-1.3 percentage points, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.5 , -0.04) or the coinsurance policy (-0.8 percentage points, 95% CI = -2.0, 0.3). The proportion of patients initiating beta-blockers after hospitalization for acute MI remained steady at about 61% during the study period, similar to that observed in a control population of elderly Pennsylvania residents with full drug coverage.
Fixed patient copayment and coinsurance policies had little negative effect on adherence to relatively inexpensive beta-blocker therapy, or initiation of beta-blockers after acute MI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17685825 View in PubMed
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Adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer in the elderly: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124994
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 May 20;30(15):1813-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2012
Author
Sinead Cuffe
Christopher M Booth
Yingwei Peng
Gail E Darling
Gavin Li
Weidong Kong
William J Mackillop
Frances A Shepherd
Author Affiliation
Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. sinead.cuffe@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 May 20;30(15):1813-21
Date
May-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Chi-Square Distribution
Electronic Health Records
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is predominantly a disease of the elderly. Retrospective analyses of the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group JBR.10 trial and the Lung Adjuvant Cisplatin Evaluation (LACE) meta-analysis suggest that the elderly benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. However, the elderly were under-represented in these studies, raising concerns regarding the reproducibility of the study results in clinical practice.
By using the Ontario Cancer Registry, we identified 6,304 patients with NSCLC who were treated with surgical resection from 2001 to 2006. Registry data were linked to electronic treatment records. Uptake of chemotherapy was compared across age groups: younger than 70, 70 to 74, 75 to 79, and = 80 years. As a proxy of survival benefit from chemotherapy, we compared survival of patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2006 with survival of those diagnosed from 2001 to 2003. Hospitalization rates within 6 to 24 weeks of surgery served as a proxy of severe chemotherapy-related toxicity.
In all, 2,763 (43.8%) of 6,304 surgical patients were elderly (age = 70 years). Uptake of adjuvant chemotherapy in the elderly increased from 3.3% (2001 to 2003) to 16.2% (2004 to 2006). Among evaluable elderly patients, 70% received cisplatin and 28% received carboplatin-based regimens. Requirements for dose adjustments or drug substitutions were similar across age groups. Hospitalization rates within 6 to 24 weeks of surgery were similar across age groups (28.0% for patients age
PubMed ID
22529258 View in PubMed
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Administrative data accurately identified intensive care unit admissions in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168382
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;59(8):802-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Damon C Scales
Jun Guan
Claudio M Martin
Donald A Redelmeier
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, G1 06, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. damon.scales@utoronto.ca
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;59(8):802-7
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases as Topic
Health Services Research
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Intensive Care Units - utilization
Medical Record Linkage
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To evaluate the accuracy of Ontario administrative health data for identifying intensive care unit (ICU) patients.
Records from the Critical Care Research Network patient registry (CCR-Net) were linked to the Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP) database and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) database. The CCR-Net was considered the criterion standard for assessing the accuracy of different OHIP or CIHI codes for identifying ICU admission.
The highest positive predictive value (PPV) for ICU admission (91%) was obtained using a CIHI special care unit (SCU) code, but its sensitivity was poor (26%). A strategy based on a combination of CIHI SCU codes yielded a lower PPV (84%) but a higher sensitivity (92%). A strategy based purely on OHIP claims yielded further reductions in PPV (73%), gains in specificity (99%), and moderate sensitivity (56%). The highest sensitivity (100%) was obtained using a combination of CIHI and OHIP codes in exchange for poor PPV (32%).
Administrative databases can be used to identify ICU patients, but no single strategy simultaneously provided high sensitivity, specificity, and PPV. Researchers should consider the study purpose when selecting a strategy for health services research on ICU patients.
PubMed ID
16828673 View in PubMed
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Administrative Data Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment: AFFECT, a cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173735
Source
JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):309-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2005
Author
Christine A Beck
Hugues Richard
Jack V Tu
Louise Pilote
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):309-17
Date
Jul-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Benchmarking
Cluster analysis
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quebec
Abstract
Hospital report cards are increasingly being implemented for quality improvement despite lack of strong evidence to support their use.
To determine whether hospital report cards constructed using linked hospital and prescription administrative databases are effective for improving quality of care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI).
The Administrative Data Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment (AFFECT) study, a cluster randomized trial.
Patients with AMI who were admitted to 76 acute care hospitals in Quebec that treated at least 30 AMI patients per year between April 1, 1999, and March 31, 2003.
Hospitals were randomly assigned to receive rapid (immediate; n = 38 hospitals and 2533 patients) or delayed (14 months; n = 38 hospitals and 3142 patients) confidential feedback on quality indicators constructed using administrative data.
Quality indicators pertaining to processes of care and outcomes of patients admitted between 4 and 10 months after randomization. The primary indicator was the proportion of elderly survivors of AMI at each study hospital who filled a prescription for a beta-blocker within 30 days after discharge.
At follow-up, adjusted prescription rates within 30 days after discharge were similar in the early vs late groups (for beta-blockers, odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-1.37; for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.90-1.52; for lipid-lowering drugs, OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.86-1.50; and for aspirin, OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.84-1.33). In addition, adjusted mortality was similar in both groups, as were length of in-hospital stay, physician visits after discharge, waiting times for invasive cardiac procedures, and readmissions for cardiac complications.
Feedback based on one-time, confidential report cards constructed using administrative data is not an effective strategy for quality improvement regarding care of patients with AMI. A need exists for further studies to rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of more intensive report card interventions.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2005 Nov-Dec;143(3):7916262236
Comment In: JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):369-7116030283
PubMed ID
16030275 View in PubMed
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415 records – page 1 of 42.