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Accuracy of the oncology patients information system in a regional cancer centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192276
Source
Oncol Rep. 2002 Jan-Feb;9(1):167-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jonathan C Yau
Arlene Chan
Tamina Eapen
Keith Oirourke
Libni Eapen
Author Affiliation
Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 7T1, Canada. jonathan.yau@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Oncol Rep. 2002 Jan-Feb;9(1):167-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - pathology
Databases, Factual - standards
Female
Hospital Information Systems - standards
Humans
Lymphoma - pathology
Medical Oncology - standards
Medical Records
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of the Oncology Patient Information Systems (OPIS) database for patients with breast cancer and lymphoma. We conducted a detailed individual patient chart review of patients with lymphoma or breast cancer who were seen in consultation by an oncologist between July 1991 and June 1995. Information extracted directly from the patients' clinic charts was compared with information captured in the OPIS database with respect to demographics, staging, histological diagnosis, treatment, relapse status, date of relapse and survival. OPIS database failed to capture 14.4% and 23.4% of lymphoma and breast cancer patients seen over the four-year period. When compared to the clinic charts there were differences in staging in 31.5% and 8.1%, relapse status in 27.6% and 7.2%, and date of relapse in 56.4% and 14.7% of lymphoma and breast cancer patients respectively. The deficiencies and inaccuracies in the OPIS database emphasize the need for caution in basing administrative, policy, or practice decisions on this database.
PubMed ID
11748476 View in PubMed
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Adapting an Australian question prompt list in oncology to a Norwegian setting-a combined method approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286916
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Anita Amundsen
Bente Ervik
Phyllis Butow
Martin H N Tattersall
Svein Bergvik
Tore Sørlie
Tone Nordøy
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Australia
Communication
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - standards
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
A question prompt list (QPL) is an inexpensive communication aid that has been proved effective in encouraging patients to ask questions during medical consultations. The aim of this project was to develop a QPL for Norwegian cancer patients.
A multimethod approach was chosen combining literature review, focus groups, and a survey in the process of culturally adjusting an Australian QPL for the Norwegian setting. Participants were recruited from the University Hospital of North Norway. They were asked to review and comment on iterative drafts of the QPL.
Eighteen patients, mean age 54, participated in the focus groups, and 31 patients, mean age 55, participated in the survey. Focus groups suggested that topics related to accompanying relatives, children as next of kin, and rehabilitation were important and should be added to the original QPL. The survey revealed that most questions from the original QPL were considered both useful and understandable. Although half of the patients found some questions about prognosis unpleasant, the vast majority considered the same questions useful. Questions regarding clinical studies, multidisciplinary teams, and public versus private hospitals had lower ratings of usefulness.
QPLs require some adjustment to the local cultural context, and a mixed method approach may provide a useful model for future cultural adaptation of QPLs. The present QPL has been adjusted to the needs of oncology patients in the Norwegian health care setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27539133 View in PubMed
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Adherence to treatment guidelines in stage II/III rectal cancer in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132600
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2012 Feb;24(1):e9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
N Sharaf Eldin
Y. Yasui
A. Scarfe
M. Winget
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. marcy.winget@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol). 2012 Feb;24(1):e9-17
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - pathology - therapy
Aged
Alberta
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Digestive System Surgical Procedures
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Radiotherapy
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Rectal Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Referral and Consultation
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Evidence suggests that pre- and/or postoperative treatment benefits patients with stage II/III rectal cancer. This study aimed to quantify treatment patterns and adherence to treatment guidelines, and to identify barriers to having a consultation with an oncologist and barriers to receiving treatment in stage II/III rectal cancer, in a publicly funded medical care system.
Patients with surgically treated stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed from 2002 to 2005 in Alberta, a Canadian province with a population of 3 million, were included. Demographic and treatment information from the Alberta Cancer Registry were linked to data from electronic medical records, hospital discharge data and the 2001 Canadian Census. The study outcomes were 'not having an oncologist consultation' and 'not receiving guideline-based treatment'. The relative risks of the two outcomes in association with patient characteristics were estimated using multivariable log-binomial regression.
Of a total of 910 surgically treated stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma patients, 748 (82%) had a consultation with an oncologist and 414 (45.5%) received treatment. Pre-/post-surgical treatment modalities and timing varied; 96 (10.5%) received neoadjuvant treatment only, 389 (42.7%) received adjuvant treatment only, 119 (13.1%) received both, and 306 (33.6%) had surgery alone. Factors related to not having a consultation with an oncologist included older age, co-morbidities, cancer stage II and region of residence. Older age was the most significantly associated factor with not receiving treatment (relative risk=2.23; 95% confidence interval: 1.89, 2.64).
Disparities exist in the receipt of treatment in stage II/III rectal cancer. Factors such as age, region of residence and stage should not be barriers to consulting an oncologist to discuss or receive treatment. The reasons for these disparities need to be identified and addressed.
PubMed ID
21802914 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the status of oncological service to children in the Ukrainian SSR and the steps for its improvement]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27552
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1978 Sep-Oct;(5):3-5
Publication Type
Article

Are medical oncologists biased in their treatment of the large woman with breast cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194153
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2001 Mar;66(2):123-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
Y. Madarnas
C A Sawka
E. Franssen
G A Bjarnason
Author Affiliation
Division of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. yolanda.madarnas@krcc.on.ca
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2001 Mar;66(2):123-33
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - administration & dosage
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Epirubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Medical Oncology - standards
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Obesity
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prejudice
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Obesity and breast cancer are common conditions that often coexist. Concerns of relative overdosing of chemotherapy in the large cancer patient have led clinicians to apply empiric dose reductions, 'cap' the body surface area (BSA) at 2 m2, or use ideal rather than actual body weight to calculate BSA. There are no data supporting or refuting these practices and their prevalence is unknown. We sought to determine the distribution of body size and prevalence of obesity in the breast cancer population of our cancer centre, and to determine clinician chemotherapy dosing practices in the era of modern adjuvant chemotherapy.
Women with invasive breast cancer receiving systemic therapy at our institution between 1980 and 1998 were identified and their recorded height and weight were used to calculate BSA and body mass index (BMI). We reviewed the first cycle adjuvant chemotherapy dosing practices from 1990-1998. The ideal dose of chemotherapy was calculated based on calculated BSA, and then contrasted with the actual dose received at cycle one. Discrepancies were recorded and categorized, using the largest single drug reduction if more than one drug was reduced.
Mean BMI in the systemic therapy population was 26.4 +/- 5.3 kg/m2, 54% were overweight, 2% severely obese and 18% moderately so. Their mean BSA was 1.7 +/- 0.2 m2 and only 5% had a BSA > or = 2 m2. In the adjuvant chemotherapy subgroup, most patients received > or = 85% of their ideal dose. The mean dose reduction was 5.3 +/- 11.3% versus 9.9 +/- 11.3% in the BSA or = 2 m2 groups, respectively (p = 0.02), and 4.3 +/- 8.2% versus 6.7 +/- 13.1% in the BMI or = 25 kg/m2 groups, respectively (p = 0.008). While only 24% of chemotherapy dose reductions of > or = 15% were in the BSA > or = 2 m2 group, 76% were in the BMI > or = 25 kg/m2 group.
Obesity is prevalent in this breast cancer population. BSA is not a sensitive index of large body size. We consistently detected more frequent empiric dose reductions at cycle one of adjuvant chemotherapy, with reductions of greater magnitude in the largest women (BSA > or = 2 m2) and those who were overweight (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2).
PubMed ID
11437098 View in PubMed
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[Brain tumours: analysis of epidemiology and neuro-oncology service status in the Ul'ianovsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114042
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2013;77(1):62-5; discussion 65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
R F Ishmatov
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2013;77(1):62-5; discussion 65
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - standards - trends
Middle Aged
Neurosurgical Procedures - standards - trends
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
The incidence of brain tumours: analysis of epidemiology figures and neurooncology service status in the Ulyanovsk region during 1996-2005 was investigated. This article demonstrates lack of early brain tumour diagnosis in the region owing to insufficient equipment of medical care facilities and low level of expertise among primary care phycisians. Risk factors for complications development and increase in postoperative mortality are defined. The uniform algorithm of medical care for brain tumour patients will allow considerably improve treatment results.
PubMed ID
23659122 View in PubMed
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Communication between cancer specialists and family doctors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222147
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Jan;39:49-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
M L Wood
Author Affiliation
Thames Valley Family Practice Research Unit, London, Ont.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 Jan;39:49-57
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - standards
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication Barriers
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Medical Oncology - standards
Ontario
Physician's Role
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
In a qualitative study using focus group interviews, family physicians in London, Ont, were asked to describe how they perceived their role in follow-up cancer patient care. Barriers to fulfilling this role existed both in the tertiary cancer care setting and among the family physicians themselves. Suggestions for overcoming these barriers were generated.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8382093 View in PubMed
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Diffusion of standards of care for cancer pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215349
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Apr 15;152(8):1205-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1995
Author
N. Hagen
J. Young
N. MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Apr 15;152(8):1205-9
Date
Apr-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Diffusion of Innovation
Documentation
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Medical Oncology - standards
Neoplasms - complications
Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Pain Measurement
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care - standards
Quality of Life
Abstract
The authors report the results of a symposium on improving the standards of care for patients with cancer pain. The symposium was sponsored by the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control of the National Cancer Institute of Canada and was held Apr. 8 to 10, 1994, in Toronto. Participants included experts on control of cancer pain and on diffusion techniques, patients with cancer and representatives of regulatory agencies. They suggested the following strategies to improve outcomes in patients with cancer pain. Processes for accreditation of health care institutions should require documentation of cancer pain, its treatment and its outcome. Tertiary care facilities that provide cancer treatment should have expert, subspecialty, multidisciplinary programs for pain control and should provide adequate psychosocial support to patients suffering cancer pain. The Canadian Cancer Society should conduct a public-education campaign to encourage patients to report pain to health care providers. The National Cancer Institute of Canada should foster research on cancer pain by restructuring its process for review of pain-research protocols. Examinations for professionals who care for patients with cancer should include a defined number of questions concerning pain and symptom control. Provincial programs to monitor prescribing through the use of triplicate prescription pads should have an educational as well as regulatory purpose.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 Sep 15;153(6):741-27545082
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 Aug 1;153(3):2527614438
PubMed ID
7736371 View in PubMed
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[Do Norwegian cancer patients receive the care they deserve?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79956
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Nov 2;126(21):2828-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2006
Author
Wilking Nils
Jönsson Bengt
Svedman Christer
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. nils.vilking@karolinska.se
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Nov 2;126(21):2828-9
Date
Nov-2-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - standards
Humans
Medical Oncology - standards
Neoplasms - drug therapy
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Feb 15;127(4):46017304285
PubMed ID
17086228 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.