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37 records – page 1 of 4.

10 morale boosters for off-shift staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223424
Source
MLO Med Lab Obs. 1992 Aug;24(8):40-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
K V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
School of Health Services Administration, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.
Source
MLO Med Lab Obs. 1992 Aug;24(8):40-1
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Morale
Night Care - manpower
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
PubMed ID
10120562 View in PubMed
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An analysis of occupational factors related to shoulder discomfort in diagnostic medical sonographers and vascular technologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125036
Source
Work. 2012;42(3):355-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Shawn C Roll
Kevin D Evans
Cristina D Hutmire
Joan P Baker
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. sroll@usc.edu
Source
Work. 2012;42(3):355-65
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Male
Medical Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal System - injuries
Occupational Health Services - utilization
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Radiology Information Systems - manpower
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ultrasonography - adverse effects
United States
Vascular Surgical Procedures - manpower
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Three-fourths of diagnostic medical sonographers (DMS) and vascular technologists (VT) experiencing discomfort due to job demands indicate having discomfort in the shoulder region. An analysis of factors related to shoulder discomfort highlighted salient factors requiring further investigation and intervention.
The respondents were a convenient sample of DMS and VT that answered a survey, hosted on a secure website.
The responses of 2,163 DMS and VT from a survey of a representative sample were analyzed to determine personal factors, work demands, and workstation design characteristics of those experiencing discomfort in the shoulder region. Frequencies and response distributions were calculated and cross tabulation with chi-square analysis was completed.
A majority of respondents with shoulder discomfort have co-morbid reports of discomfort in other locations. While overall sonographer discomfort is linked to age and years of experience, shoulder discomfort was also noted to be linked to specific workstation characteristics. A lack of adjustability in equipment, picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstations, and positions required to complete bedside exams contributes to discomfort due to sustained and repetitive shoulder abduction and twisting of the neck and trunk.
There is a need for studies investigating redesign of equipment and workstations or interventions with DMS and VT specifically focused on improving adjustability and improved positioning of sonographers in order to reduce shoulder discomfort while performing job demands.
PubMed ID
22523028 View in PubMed
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Appreciated abroad, depreciated at home. The career of a radiochemist in Norway: Ellen Gleditsch (1879-1968).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173899
Source
Isis. 2004 Dec;95(4):576-609
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Annette Lykknes
Lise Kvittingen
Anne Kristine Børresen
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. Annette.Lykknes@chem.ntnu.no
Source
Isis. 2004 Dec;95(4):576-609
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry - history
Female
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Medical Laboratory Personnel - history
Norway
Paris
Physicians, Women - history
Radiology - history
Research Personnel - history
United States
Abstract
Ellen Gleditsch (1879-1968) became Norway's first authority on radioactivity and the country's second female full professor. From her many years abroad--in Marie Curie's laboratory in Paris and at Yale University in New Haven with Bertram Boltram--she became internationally acknowledged and developed an extensive personal and scientific network. In the Norwegian scientific community she was, however, less appreciated, and her appointment as a professor in 1929 caused controversy. Despite the recommendation of the expert committee, her predecessor and his allies spread the view that Gleditsch was a diligent but outdated researcher with little scientific promise-a view that apparently persists in the Norwegian chemical community today. In addition to her scientific work, Gleditsch acquired political influence by joining the International Federation of University Women in 1920; she later became the president of both the Norwegian section and the worldwide organization. She worked in particular to establish scholarships enabling women to go abroad.
PubMed ID
16011295 View in PubMed
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[Are laboratory results reliable? Serious factors are involved].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208388
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2092-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1997
Author
E. Theodorsson
Author Affiliation
Linköpings universitet, klinisk kemi, Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 May 28;94(22):2092-6
Date
May-28-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Clinical Competence
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Humans
Medical Laboratory Personnel
Probability
Reference Values
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1997 Aug 6;94(32-33):27179289573
PubMed ID
9213666 View in PubMed
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Compliance with personal precautions against exposure to bloodborne pathogens among laboratory workers: a Canadian survey .

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159503
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;29(1):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Cheryl L Main
Soo Chan Carusone
Kurt Davis
Mark Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Canada. mainc@hhsc.ca
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;29(1):66-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Male
Medical Laboratory Personnel
Occupational Exposure
Universal Precautions - methods
Abstract
A survey was conducted in laboratories across Canada to determine rates of compliance with recommended safety precautions against exposure to bloodborne pathogens and the rationale for current behaviors. Laboratory workers reported high rates of exposure to bodily fluids and poor rates of compliance with personal protective behaviors. This national study has identified several deficiencies and strategies for improvement.
PubMed ID
18171190 View in PubMed
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[Current status, problems and prospects of the development of laboratory services in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206676
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 1997 Sep;(9):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997

[Effect of occupational factors on the immunological system condition of medical practitioners of clinical and laboratorial services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119590
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 May-Jun;(3):44-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Oborina
L F Telesheva
V V Kharunzhin
A A Shestakova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 May-Jun;(3):44-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Incidence
Medical Laboratory Personnel
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Physicians
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
Labor conditions, health and immune status of employees of clinicodiagnostic (biochemical and bacteriological) laboratories of medicoprophylactic institutions are studied. Syndromes of immunodeficiency are revealed, labor conditions and general and chronic morbidity rate among laboratories employees are interrelated.
PubMed ID
23088125 View in PubMed
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Erythrocytapheresis compared with whole blood phlebotomy for the treatment of hereditary haemochromatosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258183
Source
Blood Transfus. 2014 Jan;12 Suppl 1:s84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Tatjana Sundic
Tor Hervig
Signe Hannisdal
Jörg Assmus
Rune J Ulvik
Richard W Olaussen
Sigbjørn Berentsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Haugesund Hospital, Helse Fonna, Haugesund, Norway.
Source
Blood Transfus. 2014 Jan;12 Suppl 1:s84-9
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers
Cytapheresis - economics
Female
Ferritins - blood
Genotype
Hemochromatosis - blood - economics - genetics - therapy
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Iron - blood
Male
Medical Laboratory Personnel - economics
Middle Aged
Norway
Phlebotomy - economics
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Transferrin - analysis
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Hereditary haemochromatosis may result in severe organ damage which can be prevented by therapy. We studied the possible advantages and disadvantages of erythrocytapheresis as compared with phlebotomy in patients with hereditary haemochromatosis.
In a prospective, randomised, open-label study, patients with hereditary haemochromatosis were randomised to bi-weekly apheresis or weekly whole blood phlebotomy. Primary end-points were decrease in ferritin levels and transferrin saturation. Secondary endpoints were decrease in haemoglobin levels, discomfort during the therapeutic procedure, costs and technicians' working time.
Sixty-two patients were included. Thirty patients were randomised to apheresis and 32 to whole blood phlebotomy. Initially, ferritin levels declined more rapidly in the apheresis group, and the difference became statistically highly significant at 11 weeks; however, time to normalisation of ferritin level was equal in the two groups. We observed no significant differences in decline of transferrin saturation, haemoglobin levels or discomfort. The mean cumulative technician time consumption until the ferritin level reached 50 µg/L was longer in the apheresis group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The cumulative costs for materials until achievement of the desired ferritin levels were three-fold higher in the apheresis group.
Treatment of hereditary haemochromatosis with erythrocytapheresis instead of whole blood phlebotomy results in a more rapid initial decline in ferritin levels and a reduced number of procedures per patient, but not in earlier achievement of target ferritin level. The frequency of discomfort was equally low with the two methods. The costs and, probably, technician time consumption were higher in the apheresis group.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24333062 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.