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216 records – page 1 of 22.

Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):176-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2007
Author
Jessie L McGowan
Patrick Ellis
Peter Tugwell
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):176-7
Date
Jul-17-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Libraries, Medical - utilization
Medical Informatics - standards - trends
Needs Assessment
Research
Students, Medical
Notes
Cites: Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):72-4, 416548438
Cites: CMAJ. 2007 Mar 27;176(7):917-817389434
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jul 18;175(2):129, 13116847269
Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Mar 27;176(7):917-817389434
PubMed ID
17638959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving standardization of health information in Canada by the year 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201712
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1998;52 Pt 1:425-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
C. Fitzgerald
L. Ogilvie
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 1998;52 Pt 1:425-8
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services - classification
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Management
Information Services - standards
Medical Informatics - standards
Needs Assessment
Abstract
As health reforms gain momentum in Canada, a critical need has been identified for the development of standardized health information across the continuum of health services. Although vast amounts of data are collected, deficiencies and gaps in current information systems seriously limit its effective use. As provinces and territories move toward more integrated health services systems, the necessity for a comprehensive and systematic analysis of health information requirements, and the development of requisite standards has never been greater. To begin addressing this need, the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) established a number of interrelated projects in 1995. This paper describes the goals of these projects, as well as the approach used to assess information needs across health services and to develop required standards.
PubMed ID
10384492 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A computer professor questions computerization: the projects will become institutions which no-one can evaluate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68972
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-1997
Author
H. Fällman
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jan 22;94(4):204-6
Date
Jan-22-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Computers
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Evaluation Studies
Medical Informatics
Sweden
Telemedicine
PubMed ID
9053640 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adopting and introducing new technology to improve patient care: a wedding of clinicians and informatics specialists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151428
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:343-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Jeff Barnett
Ann Syme
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Victoria, BC, Canada. jeff.barnett@bccancer.bc.ca
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;143:343-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cooperative Behavior
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Personnel
Humans
Information Services
Medical Informatics
Pain - drug therapy
Palliative Care
Patient Care - standards
Abstract
The BC Cancer Agency sees 128,172 patients per year, of which 2,186 are referred to the Patient Symptom Management/Palliative Care (PSMPC) clinics for tertiary symptom management. Other than at the PSMPC clinics, screening for symptom distress is extremely variable because there is no systematic assessment protocol. In a recent audit of patients coming to the Cancer Agency, approximately 64% of patients reported experiencing a moderate to severe level of symptom distress. Of the total patients in the audit (n = 1,147), only 18 were seen by the PSMPC teams and it is unclear whether or not the remaining patients had their symptoms attended to by a health professional at the BCCA.The tool which the BCCA has chosen for screening and assessment is the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), which was developed by Dr. Eduardo Bruera. ESAS is a nine-item, self-reporting, visual analogue instrument used to measure pain and other symptoms using numeric ratings. Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) has developed an electronic means whereby patients' ESAS scores are entered and housed in an electronic health record and then used for triage. BCCA is in partnership with CCO to adapt this system for use in BC.
PubMed ID
19380958 View in PubMed
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An inventory of information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194210
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):175-85; discussion 185-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
T K Hameed
W G Hodge
R. Buhrmann
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):175-85; discussion 185-6
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blindness - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Medical Informatics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Vision, Low - epidemiology
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several health databases contain information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada. Such databases may permit studies of the outcomes, predictors, economic costs and meta-analysis of ocular health problems and visual disability. In this paper we summarize the existing public health information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada.
A systematic search was performed to find the information in three areas: health administrative databases, health surveys and registries. Both literature searching and Internet searching were performed. The institutions were notified by email or telephone that information pertaining to vision and blindness was desired. When necessary, we visited the institution to obtain the information.
Health administrative databases contain information on a wide cross-section of diagnoses but are usually limited in detail and seldom provide longitudinal information. Health surveys have a limited amount of systematic information on vision-related questions and rely exclusively on self-reporting. Registries exist on a wide range of visual topics. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) has the most comprehensive registry.
This is the first attempt at summarizing all the public health information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada. The present population-based ocular information has numerous shortcomings. More comprehensive validation of large registries, such as that of the CNIB, is needed to provide the foundation for a longitudinal ocular surveillance system. Such a system could guide research on risk factors and the effect of treatment, economic analyses, and public policy for ocular research and service allocation.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):171-211428525
PubMed ID
11428526 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of escalation of AIDS and HIV infection in Ukraine. Information technology for management of epidemics and risk ranking]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7182
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Jul-Sep;(5-6):3-17
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Lapushenko
K L Atoev
S P Berezhnov
E N Gorban'
A T Marchenko
Iu G Slesarev
A M Shcherbinskaia
S A Filippovich
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Jul-Sep;(5-6):3-17
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Medical Informatics
Models, Statistical
Risk assessment
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The article presents an approach to the development of information technology for management of epidemics and risk ranking to increase the efficacy of struggle with HIV/AIDS in Ukraine, minimize incidence rate, maximize the quality of health care, and augment the reliability of a long-term forecasting of epidemiological situation in Ukraine and its separate regions.
PubMed ID
15605812 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of organizational readiness for e-health in a rehabilitation centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131110
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mariama Touré
Lise Poissant
Bonnie R Swaine
Author Affiliation
Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montreal, Qc, Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(2):167-73
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Diffusion of Innovation
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Medical Informatics
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The aims of this study were to assess organizational readiness for e-health among the staff of an out-patient rehabilitation centre and to identify the personal characteristics of potential users that may have influenced readiness.
A cross-sectional study was conducted with 137 clinicians, 28 managers, and 47 nonclinical staff in a rehabilitation centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing organizational readiness for e-health. The measure contained three subscales: Individual, Organizational and Technological. Data were also collected on the users' profile, use of technologies and typical response to new information.
Generally, participants considered themselves ready to adopt e-health in their work (X?=?73.8%, SD?=?8.5) and they also had a favorable view of the technologies in place (X?73.8%, SD?=?7.2). However, they perceived the center as being only moderately ready (X?66.6%, SD?=?9.8) for e-health changes. Perceived workload and position/duties in the organization were found to have an impact on readiness for e-health.
These results underscore the importance of addressing organizational readiness for change as a multidimensional concept. Based on these results, implementation strategies tailored to the specific profile of a rehabilitation organization were identified.
PubMed ID
21936712 View in PubMed
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216 records – page 1 of 22.