Skip header and navigation

Refine By

391 records – page 1 of 40.

Accuracy of family cancer history in breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217868
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1994 Jul;3(4):321-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
B. Theis
N. Boyd
G. Lockwood
D. Tritchler
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1994 Jul;3(4):321-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Colonic Neoplasms - genetics
Death Certificates
Family Health
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medical History Taking
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - genetics
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - genetics
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
We assessed the validity of information reported by patients with breast cancer on cancer in first- and second-degree relatives. In Toronto, Canada, 165 patients completed mailed questionnaires about cancer in relatives and were then interviewed in person. Their reports were compared with relatives' hospital records, cancer registry or death records for presence of cancer, site and age at diagnosis. Questionnaire and interview reports agreed with records for 82-96% of reports on first-degree and 48-80% on second-degree relatives. Proband reports of cancer sites in first-degree relatives were generally accurate (breast 99%, ovary 100%, prostate 85%, colon 93%). Reports of cancer sites in second-degree relatives were accurate for prostate cancer but only for 85% of breast and 72% of colon cancers. Age at diagnosis of breast cancer was correct in 92% of cases in first-degree and 54% in second-degree relatives. The interview contributed additional information about the presence of cancer in second-degree relatives, and the site and age at diagnosis in first- and second-degree relatives. In a similar population the questionnaire alone should yield adequate data for identifying families that warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
7950886 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A Computer-based record system at a myocardial infarction department]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55774
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Nov 16;80(46):4408-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-16-1983
Author
C G Ericsson
T. Lundman
O. Gardfjäll
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Nov 16;80(46):4408-9
Date
Nov-16-1983
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computers
Humans
Medical History Taking
Medical Records
Myocardial Infarction
Sweden
PubMed ID
6656482 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute appendicitis in patients over the age of 65 years; comparison of clinical and computer based decision making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217866
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1994 Jul;36(3):239-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
M. Eskelinen
J. Ikonen
P. Lipponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Biomed Comput. 1994 Jul;36(3):239-49
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - diagnosis
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aging
Appendicitis - diagnosis
Decision Making
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Medical History Taking
Multivariate Analysis
Pain
Palpation
Prospective Studies
Rectum
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The role of clinical and computer based decision in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the elderly was studied in connection with the Research Committee of the World Organization of Gastroenterology (OMGE) survey of acute abdominal pain. A total of 220 patients over the age of 65 years presenting with acute abdominal pain were included in the study at the Central Hospital of Savonlinna and at the University Hospital of Tampere. Twenty-two preoperative clinical history variables, 14 clinical signs and three tests were evaluated in a single variable and multivariate analysis to find the best combination of predictors of acute appendicitis in the aged. In order to sum up the contributions of independent diagnostic factors, a diagnostic score (DS) was built: DS = 2.81 x (rectal digital tenderness; 1 = yes, 0 = no) + 2.54 x (rigidity; 1 = yes, 0 = no) + 2.06 x (renal tenderness; 1 = no, 0 = yes) + 2.33 x (bowel sounds; 1 = normal, 2 = absent/abnormal) - 8.13. The sensitivity of preoperative clinical decision in detecting acute appendicitis in the aged was 0.79 with a specificity of 0.92, an efficiency of 0.90 and usefulness index (UI) of 0.56. At a cut-off level of -2.78 the DS reached a sensitivity of 0.84 in detecting acute appendicitis with a specificity of 0.87, an efficiency of 0.87 and UI of 0.68. When the patients with a DS value between -2.78 and -0.45 were considered as non-defined (n = 28, follow-up required before the decision to operate), the sensitivity of the computer-aided diagnosis in detecting acute appendicitis in the elderly was 0.77 with a specificity of 0.97, an efficiency of 0.96 and UI of 0.57. In the elderly patients where a leucocyte count was available (n = 157), location of pain, rectal digital tenderness and leucocyte count predicted significantly acute appendicitis. At a cut-off level of -2.62 the DS reached a sensitivity of 0.81 in detecting acute appendicitis with a specificity of 0.92, an efficiency of 0.91 and UI of 0.59. When the patients with a DS value between -2.62 and 0.06 were considered as nondefined (n = 12, follow-up required before the decision to operate), the sensitivity of the computer-aided diagnosis (leucocyte count available) in detecting acute appendicitis in the elderly improved to 0.86 with a specificity of 0.94, an efficiency of 0.93 and UI of 0.69. In our study the diagnostic scoring system for the elderly performed well considering the simple nature of its structure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7960209 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute asthma: emergency department management and prospective evaluation of outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229449
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):591-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1990
Author
J M Fitzgerald
F E Hargreave
Author Affiliation
Firestone Regional Chest and Allergy Unit, St. Joseph's Hospital, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Mar 15;142(6):591-5
Date
Mar-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Adult
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Emergencies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Ontario
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Abstract
To determine the current management of acute asthma in the emergency department and to evaluate outcome we reviewed the charts of 99 patients aged 15 to 55 years who presented to the emergency department of a tertiary referral, university-affiliated hospital and were subsequently discharged with a diagnosis of acute asthma. Outcome was evaluated prospectively, with a structured questionnaire, by telephone. During the visit pulsus paradoxus was documented in four patients. Spirometry was done in 63 patients; postbronchodilator values ranged from 0.9 to 4.1 L. A total of 92 patients received inhaled bronchodilator therapy, most by wet nebulization. Sixteen patients received anticholinergic agents and three received theophylline. Ingested corticosteroids were given to 27 patients. Of the 71 patients contacted, a mean of 12 days after the visit, 26 (37%) had sought further medical attention, 19 at the emergency department; 9 had required admission. Forty-six patients reported that their condition had improved, but over 60% continued to have cough, sputum production, nocturnal waking and early-morning chest tightness. The results indicate that asthma continues to be undertreated in the emergency department and highlight the importance of routine spirometry in all patients and the need for systemic corticosteroid therapy.
Notes
Cites: Chest. 1987 Sep;92(3):460-63622023
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 15;249(15):2043-66403719
Cites: Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):718-222971515
Cites: Chest. 1988 Oct;94(4):723-63168567
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988 Sep;138(3):535-93202409
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jan 15;140(2):153-62910398
Cites: Chest. 1989 Apr;95(4):888-942647424
Cites: Respir Med. 1989 May;83(3):219-262595040
Cites: Am J Med. 1983 Aug;75(2):259-626881177
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 1;310(9):577-806694709
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1985 Aug;132(2):283-62862819
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Jan 16;314(3):150-23510384
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1986 Jan;77(1 Pt 1):1-53944367
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jan 25;1(8474):181-42868207
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Feb 13;314(7):423-93511379
Cites: Thorax. 1985 Dec;40(12):897-9022869594
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1986 Sep;105(3):390-83090920
Cites: Eur J Respir Dis Suppl. 1986;147:16-213533588
Cites: Am J Med. 1987 Jan;82(1):59-642879458
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Aug 11;309(6):336-96866069
Cites: Chest. 1988 Mar;93(3):476-813342656
Cites: Chest. 1988 Mar;93(3):614-83342674
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Mar 18;259(11):1678-843278146
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Apr 30;1(8592):981-32896838
Cites: JAMA. 1988 Jul 22-29;260(4):527-93385910
Cites: BMJ. 1988 Aug 6;297(6645):395-63408980
Cites: Br J Dis Chest. 1988 Apr;82(2):162-73166929
Cites: Am J Med. 1971 Dec;51(6):788-985129547
Cites: Br Med J. 1975 Dec 20;4(5998):680-21203720
Cites: Lancet. 1976 Apr 24;1(7965):882-458147
Cites: Am J Med. 1979 Apr;66(4):565-72373438
Cites: Br Med J. 1980 Nov 1;281(6249):1191-47427632
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Feb 21;282(6264):598-6006451257
Cites: Chest. 1981 Nov;80(5):535-67297142
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982 Sep 25;285(6345):849-506811037
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1982;23(1):27-307128670
Cites: Folia Morphol (Praha). 1982;30(3):285-907141344
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1982 Nov;126(5):825-87149447
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):459-602207896
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 Jun 1;142(11):1183, 1186-72344573
PubMed ID
1968778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing life style in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72860
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):389-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
M. Johanson
U S Larsson
R. Säljö
K. Svärdsudd
Author Affiliation
Department of Communication Studies, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):389-400
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Communication
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Patient Education
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The problem studied concerns how patients and physicians talk about and make use of information regarding patient life style in the daily practice of primary health care. The study has been carried out at two primary health care centers in central Sweden. Transcribed dialogues between 42 patients and 12 physicians have been used as a data corpus. The analyses concern the interactional patterns in the dialogues between patient and physician, how the interlocutors address life style and for what purposes. The results show a similarity between patients and physicians with respect to the extent to which they use the discourse space. However, salient differences were found in the following way: the physicians not only introduced and closed life style topics more frequently than the patients did, they also used what is referred to as an agenda driven strategy to introduce them. The patients, on the other hand, used an interactively anchored strategy. The patients, by taking the reference in the life world and by making use of the life style topics, present and articulate their identity. The physicians subsume life style issues under a medical framing of the patients' problem and they mainly address life style in order to construe a proto-typical patient rather than an individual.
PubMed ID
8844940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent girls investigated for sexual abuse: history, physical findings and legal outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33101
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1999 Sep 30;104(1):1-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
K. Edgardh
G. von Krogh
K. Ormstad
Author Affiliation
Venhälsan, Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1999 Sep 30;104(1):1-15
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Offenses - classification - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to summarize the history of assault and record the results of medicolegal examination in adolescent girls under investigation for alleged sexual abuse, and to monitor the outcome of the legal process. The investigation period was 1990-94. METHOD: A consecutive series of 94 0-para girls, aged 9-22, median age 15.0 years, were examined in the head-to-toe manner including anogenital examination. Girls were referred from investigating police and social authorities. Only non-acute examinations were performed. Findings considered consistent with abusive vaginal penetration were hymenal distortion including deep clefts, hymenal and vestibular scarring, and introital diameter permitting vaginal inspection with a 17 mm speculum in the absence of consensual intercourse. Perianal scarring was recorded. STD sampling was made on indication. Findings were documented on body sketches. Medicolegal conclusions were grouped into three categories according to history and physical findings. Information on the outcome of legal procedures was collected from referring authorities. RESULTS: For 82% (77/94) of the girls, referring agencies provided examining physicians with a detailed and consistent history of abuse, presented results comprise these 77 girls. Intrafamiliar abuse was alleged by 81% (62/77), onset prior to menarche by 53% (41/77), and repeated abuse by 74% (57/77) of the girls. Abusive genital penetration was reported by 77% (59/77) and anal penetration by 19% (14/77). Sequelae after admitted self-inflicted injury were found in 15% (12/77). Deep hymenal clefts and/or vestibular scars were found in 59% (35/59) of the girls reporting penetrative abuse, compared with 6% (1/16) when non-penetrative abuse was alleged, P
PubMed ID
10533272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agreement between self-reported and pharmacy data on medication use in the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145028
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Marianne Haapea
Jouko Miettunen
Sari Lindeman
Matti Joukamaa
Hannu Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. marianne.haapea@oulu.fi
Source
Int J Methods Psychiatr Res. 2010 Jun;19(2):88-96
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical History Taking - methods
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To compare self-reported (SR) medication use and pharmacy data for major psychoactive medications and three classes of medications used for different indications, and to determine the socio-economic factors associated with the congruence.
Postal questionnaire data collected in 1997 were compared with the register of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland on the reimbursed prescriptions purchased during 1997. Altogether 7625 subjects were included in this study. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) system.
Kappa values were 0.77, 0.68, 0.84, 0.92 and 0.55 for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, antidiabetics and beta-blocking agents, respectively. Prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa values were almost perfect (0.98-1.00). Reliability of antipsychotics use was better for married subjects than for those who were not married; and of antidepressants use for highly educated and married subjects than for those who were less educated and were not married. Altogether 414 (5.4%) responders and 285 (7.1%) non-responders had used at least one of the selected medications.
Agreement between the SR and pharmacy data was moderate for psychoactive medication use. Even though data collected by postal questionnaire may underestimate the prevalence of medication use due to non-participation it can be assumed accurate enough for study purposes.
PubMed ID
20209650 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta Perinatal Scoring System: an introduction for nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232963
Source
AARN News Lett. 1988 Jun;44(6):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988

Alcohol prevention measures at an emergency department: physicians' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174858
Source
Public Health. 2005 Sep;119(9):789-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005

American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease) in a Canadian immigrant infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245577
Source
Pediatrics. 1980 Aug;66(2):266-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1980
Author
L D Montalvo-Hicks
C L Trevenen
J N Briggs
Source
Pediatrics. 1980 Aug;66(2):266-8
Date
Aug-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Chagas Disease - diagnosis - pathology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Infant
Manitoba
Medical History Taking
Paraguay
Abstract
A case of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease) is reported. A 13-month-old Mennonite girl who immigrated to Canada from Paraguay, died at the Children's Centre in Winnipeg from an acute myocarditis due to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. This diagnosis should be considered when a patient from an endemic area presents with a clinical picture of myocarditis.
PubMed ID
6773023 View in PubMed
Less detail

391 records – page 1 of 40.