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[100-year-old who refused to be revived].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267575
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jörg Carlsson
Niels Lynøe
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Medical Futility
Sweden
PubMed ID
25584605 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and passive euthanasia: the cases of Drs. Claudio Alberto de la Rocha and Nancy Morrison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202519
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):857-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1999
Author
D. Gorman
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):857-60
Date
Mar-23-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Euthanasia, Passive - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Medical Futility
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Suicide, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Cites: Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2000 Mar;14(2):157-6010720807
Cites: Philos Public Aff. 1977 Winter;6(2):85-11211663015
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1975 Jan 9;292(2):78-801109443
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Sep 21;161(6):68510513269
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 13;161(1):18, 2010420857
PubMed ID
10189436 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes of parents and health care professionals toward active treatment of extremely premature infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194189
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Jul;108(1):152-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
D L Streiner
S. Saigal
E. Burrows
B. Stoskopf
P. Rosenbaum
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care and Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Jul;108(1):152-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Decision Making
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - therapy
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Life Support Care
Male
Medical Futility
Middle Aged
Neonatal Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Neonatology - standards - statistics & numerical data
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
To compare the attitudes of neonatologists, neonatal nurses, the parents of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) children, and the parents of normal birth weight children toward saving infants of borderline viability and who should be involved in the decision-making process and to compare physicians' and nurses' estimates of the proportion of infants who are born at various gestational ages with regard to survival, morbidity, and treatment.
A questionnaire was given to 169 parents of ELBW children and 123 parents of term children, who were part of a longitudinal study of the outcome of ELBW infants. A similar questionnaire was completed by 98 Canadian neonatologists and 99 neonatal nurses.
Physicians tended to be more optimistic than nurses regarding the probability of survival and freedom from serious disabilities and would recommend to parents life-saving interventions for their child at earlier gestational ages. A significant majority of parents believed that attempts should be made to save all infants, irrespective of condition or weight at birth, compared with only 6% of health professionals who endorsed this. In contrast to parents, health professionals believed that economic costs to society should be a factor in deciding whether to save an ELBW infant. However, health professionals did not believe that the economic status of the parents should be a factor, although the stress of raising an infant with disabilities should be. Most respondents believed that the parents and physicians should make the final decision but that other bodies, such as ethics committees or the courts, should not.
Health care professionals must recognize that their attitudes toward saving ELBW infants differ from those of parents. Parents, whether of term or extremely premature children, are more in favor of intervening to save the infant irrespective of its weight or condition at birth than are professionals. It therefore is imperative that there be joint decision making, combining the knowledge of the physician with the wishes of the parents.
PubMed ID
11433068 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bioethics for clinicians: 16. Dealing with demands for inappropriate treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204036
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 6;159(7):817-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-1998
Author
C. Weijer
P A Singer
B M Dickens
S. Workman
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ont. charles.weijer@dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Oct 6;159(7):817-21
Date
Oct-6-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bioethics
Canada
Dissent and Disputes
Ethics, Medical
Female
Group Processes
Humans
Infant
Male
Medical Futility
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Persistent Vegetative State - therapy
Refusal to Treat - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Values
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Demands by Patients or their Families for treatment thought to be inappropriate by health care providers constitute an important set of moral problems in clinical practice. A variety of approaches to such cases have been described in the literature, including medical futility, standard of care and negotiation. Medical futility fails because it confounds morally distinct cases: demand for an ineffective treatment and demand for an effective treatment that supports a controversial end (e.g., permanent unconsciousness). Medical futility is not necessary in the first case and is harmful in the second. Ineffective treatment falls outside the standard of care, and thus health care workers have no obligation to provide it. Demands for treatment that supports controversial ends are difficult cases best addressed through open communication, negotiation and the use of conflict-resolution techniques. Institutions should ensure that fair and unambiguous procedures for dealing with such cases are laid out in policy statements.
Notes
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Jan;155(1):15-209001282
Cites: Resuscitation. 1996 Nov;33(1):13-78959768
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 1995 Mar;42(3):186-917743566
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 24;158(4):491-39627562
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Mar 18;310(6981):683-47711528
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Aug 21;276(7):571-48709410
Cites: Am J Law Med. 1995;21(2-3):221-408571976
Cites: Am J Crit Care. 1995 Jul;4(4):280-57663591
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 1995 Spring;23(1):20-67627298
Cites: Hum Health Care Int. 1996 Nov;12(4):168-7211660296
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Sep 8;309(10):569-766877286
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Nov 20;315(21):1347-513773957
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1989 May-Jun;19(3):14-202656580
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949-542187394
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Aug 15;325(7):511-21852185
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1991 Sep-Oct;21(5):26-81743947
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Jun 4;326(23):1560-41285741
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 1993 Summer;21(2):231-78130833
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 May 26;330(21):1542-58164726
Cites: Resuscitation. 1994 Jan;27(1):13-218191022
Cites: New Horiz. 1994 Aug;2(3):326-318087591
Cites: J Clin Ethics. 1994 Summer;5(2):100-57919476
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Nov 14;154(21):2426-327979838
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Feb 9;160(3):309-1010065067
PubMed ID
9805031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients in a persistent vegetative state: futile or acceptable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205400
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 24;158(4):491-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1998
Author
C. Weijer
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Feb 24;158(4):491-3
Date
Feb-24-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Dissent and Disputes
Ethics, Medical
Group Processes
Heart Arrest - complications - therapy
Humans
Male
Medical Futility
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Persistent Vegetative State - complications
Resuscitation Orders - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk assessment
Value of Life
Withholding Treatment
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Aug 30;323(9):561-52199829
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Aug 15;325(7):511-21852185
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Aug 15;325(7):512-51852186
Cites: J Trauma. 1993 Sep;35(3):468-73; discussion 473-48371308
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 May 26;330(21):1542-58164726
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1976 Jun;6(3):29-31955881
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Sep 8;309(10):569-766877286
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Nov 20;315(21):1347-513773957
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1996 Dec;24(12):2046-528968275
Cites: Am J Law Med. 1995;21(2-3):221-408571976
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949-542187394
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Mar 18;310(6981):683-47711528
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 1995 Spring;23(1):20-67627298
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 14;159(1):19; author reply 19-209679481
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 14;159(1):19; author reply 19-209679479
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 14;159(1):19; author reply 19-209679480
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 14;159(1):189679477
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 14;159(1):18-9; author reply 19-209679478
PubMed ID
9627562 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the elderly long-term care population: time to reconsider.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218615
Source
Ann R Coll Physicians Surg Can. 1994 Mar;27(2):81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994

Caring for critically ill patients with advanced COPD at the end of life: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158517
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Jun;24(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Donna Goodridge
Wendy Duggleby
John Gjevre
Donna Rennie
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7T5E5, Canada. donna.goodridge@usask.ca
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2008 Jun;24(3):162-70
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Anxiety - prevention & control
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Critical Care - methods - psychology
Dyspnea - prevention & control
Empathy
Fear
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Medical Futility
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Patient Advocacy
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Respiratory Therapy - methods - psychology
Terminal Care - methods - psychology
Abstract
Providing expert critical care for the high acuity patient with a diagnosis of COPD at the end of life is both complex and challenging. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians' perspectives on the obstacles to providing quality care for individuals with COPD who die within the critical care environment. Transcripts of three focus groups of ICU clinicians were analyzed using thematic analysis. The three themes of "managing difficult symptoms", "questioning the appropriateness of life-sustaining care" and "conflicting care priorities" were noted to be significant challenges in providing high quality end of life care to this population. Difficulties in palliating dyspnea and anxiety were associated with caregiver feelings of helplessness, empathy and fears about "killing the patient". A sense of futility, concerns about "torturing the patient" and questions about the patient/family's understanding of treatment pervaded much of the discourse about caring for people with advanced COPD in the ICU. The need to prioritize care to the most unstable ICU patients meant that patients with COPD did not always receive the attention clinicians felt they should ideally have. Organizational support must be made available for critical care clinicians to effectively deal with these issues.
PubMed ID
18313923 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2010 Mar;10(3):56-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010

71 records – page 1 of 8.