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1067 records – page 1 of 107.

3,520 medication errors evaluated to assess the potential for IT-based decision support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133611
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kristine Binzer
Annemarie Hellebek
Author Affiliation
Unit for Patient Safety, Capital Region of Denmark.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2011;166:31-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Denmark
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Medication Errors - classification - statistics & numerical data
Software Design
Abstract
We have previously studied system failures involved in medication errors using a limited number of root cause analyses as source. The aim of this study was to describe a larger number of medication errors with respect to harm, involved medicines and involved system problems - thus providing information for the development of IT-based decision support. We evaluated 3,520 medication error reports derived from 12 months of consecutive reporting from 13 hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. We found 0.65% errors with serious harm and 16% with moderate harm. A small number of medicines were involved in the majority of the errors. The problems in the medication error process were heterogeneous. Some were related to specific medicines and others were related to the computerized order entry system. Accordingly decision support targeted at specific medicines and improved IT systems are part of the continuing work to reduce the frequency of medication errors.
PubMed ID
21685608 View in PubMed
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4-aminopyridine toxicity with unintentional overdose in four patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154078
Source
Neurology. 2008 Nov 25;71(22):1833-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-2008

[2001: year 1 for the patient safety in Danish hospitals?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193055
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 1;163(1):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2001

[About 5.000 patients die because of incidents not errors in Denmark each year].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180929
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Feb 2;166(6):505-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-2004

Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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[Accidental administration of racemic adrenaline. Three life-threatening cases after intravenous injection in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10909
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1080-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
B. Zeller
H J Bangstad
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Sentralsykehuset i Akershus, Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 10;118(7):1080-1
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Emergencies
English Abstract
Epinephrine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Injections, Intravenous
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - drug therapy
Male
Medication Errors
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Abstract
The inhalation of racemic adrenalin is an important part of the treatment of inflammatory airway obstruction in children. In Norway during the last few years there have been several cases of adrenal solutions intended only for inhalation being accidentally administered as intravenous injections. The solution for inhalation contains an adrenalin concentration 110 times greater than the adrenalin intended for emergency use (0.1 mg/ml). The instant consequences of intravenous injections of inhalation adrenalin include arterial hypertension followed by hypotension, cardiac ischemia and cardiac insufficiency, pulmonary oedema, and respiratory failure and the need for artificial ventilation. The clinical picture in the three patients we describe was very dramatic. The injected doses were 0.16-1.1 mg l-adrenalin per kg body weight. All children survived without sequelae. In order to reduce the risk of accidentally administering intravenous injections of adrenalin intended for inhalation a set of guidelines is being proposed.
PubMed ID
9531834 View in PubMed
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Achieving closure through disclosure: experience in a pediatric institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180246
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004

Achieving optimal prescribing: what can physicians do?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121612
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Aug;58(8):820-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Samuel Shortt
Ingrid Sketris
Author Affiliation
Office for Knowledge Transfer, Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa ON. sam.shortt@cma.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Aug;58(8):820-1
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug Costs
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - adverse effects - economics - prevention & control
Medication Errors - adverse effects - economics - prevention & control
Patient Safety
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - standards
Physician's Role
Quality Improvement
Notes
Cites: Clin Ther. 2007 Apr;29(4):742-5017617298
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1441-918490640
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Dec 8;181(12):891-619969578
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Apr 6;182(6):540-120212024
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Oct;58(4):830-916921182
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2005 Mar;51:386-716926931
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 May 25;170(11):1678-8615159366
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;29(1):155-6010433579
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Mar 15;21(4):337-4315838560
Cites: J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2006 Winter;26(1):13-2416557505
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):61-714968144
PubMed ID
22893327 View in PubMed
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1067 records – page 1 of 107.