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A 6-year experience with the Swedish adjustable gastric band Prospective long-term audit of laparoscopic gastric banding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177378
Source
Surg Endosc. 2005 Jan;19(1):21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
J. Zehetner
F. Holzinger
H. Triaca
Ch Klaiber
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Aarberg Hospital, CH-3270, Aarberg, Switzerland.
Source
Surg Endosc. 2005 Jan;19(1):21-8
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroplasty - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Laparoscopy - adverse effects
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid - complications - surgery
Prospective Studies
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In morbid obesity conservative therapy often fails to reduce overweight permanently. As a consequence, several bariatric surgical procedures have been developed to achieve permanent excess weight loss. Among these, the laparoscopic restrictive procedures seem to be the least invasive. The aim of this prospective study was to assess and analyze the effects, complications, and outcomes after the implantation of the Swedish adjustable gastric band (SAGB) in long-term follow-up.
All consecutive patients with implantation of a SAGB between August 1996 and August 2002 were prospectively investigated. The placement of the SAGB was done by laparoscopy in all cases. Success was rated by the reduction of body mass index (BMI) excess weight loss (EWL), and reduction of comorbidities. "Nonresponders" to SAGB were defined as
PubMed ID
15549627 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of healthcare worker recall and medical record review for identifying infectious exposures to hospitalized patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168575
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;27(7):722-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
M. Aquino
J M Raboud
A. McGeer
K. Green
R. Chow
P. Dimoulas
M. Loeb
D. Scales
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;27(7):722-8
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Environmental Exposure
Hospitalization
Humans
Inpatients
Medical Audit
Mental Recall
Ontario
Personnel, Hospital
Abstract
To determine the validity of using healthcare worker (HCW) recall of patient interactions and medical record review for contact tracing in a critical care setting.
Trained observers recorded the interactions of nurses, respiratory therapists, and service assistants with study patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit. These observers' records were used as the reference standard to test the criterion validity of using HCW recall data or medical record review data to identify exposure characteristics. We assessed the effects of previous quarantine of the HCW (because of possible exposure) and the availability of patients' medical records for use as memory aids on the accuracy of HCW recall.
A 10-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario.
Thirty-six HCWs observed caring for 16 patients, for a total of 55 healthcare worker shifts.
Recall accuracy was better among HCWs who were provided with patient medical records as memory aids (P
PubMed ID
16807848 View in PubMed
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[Acknowledgement of errors is part of the core of quality assurance: "To err is human, mistakes are made even in patient care..."].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225679
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 18;88(38):3082-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-1991
Author
T. Troëng
U. Sjöblom
H. Forsell
Author Affiliation
Kirurgiska kliniken, centrallasarettet, Karlskrona.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 18;88(38):3082-4
Date
Sep-18-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Malpractice
Medical Audit
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
1921599 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study in Stockholm. Significant differences between hospitals in mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55080
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Oct 28;89(44):3684-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-1992
Author
N. Rehnqvist
C. Falkenberg
K. Schenk-Gustafsson
T. Schultz
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Danderyds sjukhus, S:t Görans, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Oct 28;89(44):3684-6
Date
Oct-28-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Female
Hospitals, Municipal - standards
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1992 Dec 16;89(51-52):4492-31469996
PubMed ID
1460986 View in PubMed
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Acting on audit & feedback: a qualitative instrumental case study in mental health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295007
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-31-2018
Author
Monica Stolt Pedersen
Anne Landheim
Merete Møller
Lars Lien
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Concurrent Substance Abuse and Mental Health Disorders, Innlandet Hospital Trust, P.B. 104, 2340, Brumunddal, Norway. monica.stolt.pedersen@sykehuset-innlandet.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 01 31; 18(1):71
Date
01-31-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Benchmarking
Evidence-Based Practice
Feedback
Health Personnel
Humans
Medical Audit
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Quality Improvement
Abstract
The National Guideline for Assessment, Treatment and Social Rehabilitation of Persons with Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders, launched in 2012, is to be implemented in mental health services in Norway. Audit and feedback (A&F) is commonly used as the starting point of an implementation process. It aims to measure the research-practice gap, but its effect varies greatly. Less is known of how audit and feedback is used in natural settings. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate what is discussed and thematised when Quality Improvement (QI) teams in a District Psychiatric Centre (DPC) work to complete an action form as part of an A&F cycle in 2014.
This was an instrumental multiple case study involving four units in a DPC in Norway. We used open non-participant observation of QI team meetings in their natural setting, a total of seven teams and eleven meetings.
The discussions provided health professionals with insight into their own and their colleagues' practices. They revealed insufficient knowledge of substance-related disorders and experienced unclear role expectations. We found differences in how professional groups sought answers to questions of clinical practice and that they were concerned about whether new tasks fitted in with their routine ways of working.
Acting on A&F provided an opportunity to discuss practice in general, enhancing awareness of good practice. There was a general need for arenas to relate to practice and QI team meetings after A&F may well be a suitable arena for this. Self-assessment audits seem valuable, particular in areas where no benchmarked data exists, and there is a demand for implementation of new guidelines that might change routines and develop new roles. QI teams could benefit from having a unit leader present at meetings. Nurses and social educators and others turn to psychiatrists or psychologists for answers to clinical and organisational questions beyond guidelines, and show less confidence or routine in seeking research-based information. There is a general need to emphasise training in evidence-based practice and information seeking behaviour for all professional groups.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29386020 View in PubMed
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Acute adenitis in children: clinical course and factors predictive of surgical drainage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174333
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2005 May-Jun;41(5-6):273-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Thuy Mai Luu
Isabelle Chevalier
Marie Gauthier
Ana Maria Carceller
Arie Bensoussan
Bruce Tapiero
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hôpital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 2005 May-Jun;41(5-6):273-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - surgery
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Drainage
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymphadenitis - diagnosis - surgery
Male
Medical Audit
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To describe clinical course of children hospitalized for a first episode of acute unilateral infectious adenitis and to identify factors predictive of surgical lymph node drainage.
We reviewed medical records of children from 0 to 17 years of age discharged from a tertiary care pediatric center with a diagnosis of adenitis between 1 April 1996 and 31 March 2001. Patients were included if they had acute ( 5 cm in size and 92.6% were cervical. Thirteen of 252 blood cultures were positive (5.2%), of which one showed Streptococcus pneumoniae and 12 contaminants. Mean length of stay was 4.2 days (2.2 SD). Surgical node drainage was performed in 60 (21.1%) patients. Factors significantly associated with increased risk of surgical drainage were age 48 h (adjusted OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.2-7.2). There were no major complications. Follow-up was documented in 183 patients, of whom 92.3% achieved complete healing.
Children hospitalized for a first episode of acute unilateral infectious adenitis generally do well. Younger patients and those with longer duration of node involvement before admission have an increased risk of surgical node drainage.
PubMed ID
15953328 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: quality of care in rural Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167771
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Jan;52:68-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Trustin Domes
Olga Szafran
Cheryl Bilous
Odell Olson
G Richard Spooner
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 Jan;52:68-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Exercise Test - utilization
Female
Hospitals, Rural - standards
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services - standards
Abstract
To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region.
Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review.
Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians.
Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases).
Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital.
In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural region studied.
Quality of care for patients with AMI in this rural health region was high for most guideline elements. Standing orders, protocols, and checklists could improve care. Training and resource issues will need to be addressed to improve access to stress testing for rural patients. Clinical audit should be at the core of a system for local monitoring of quality of care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16926968 View in PubMed
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Adherence to Canadian best practice recommendations for stroke care: assessment and management of poststroke depression in an Ontario rehabilitation facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125961
Source
Top Stroke Rehabil. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):132-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine Salter
J Andrew McClure
Hannah Mahon
Norine Foley
Robert Teasell
Author Affiliation
Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Top Stroke Rehabil. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):132-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Depressive Disorder - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Personnel - standards
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
Although Canadian best practice recommendations regarding assessment and management of poststroke depression (PSD) have been established, the degree to which these evidence-based guidelines have been translated into practice is not known. The objectives of the present study are to compare current and recommended best practice and examine possible reasons for identified care gaps.
Practice audit by chart review was performed to identify recorded screening, assessment, and treatment for PSD in patients discharged from a specialized inpatient rehabilitation program over a 6-month period. A questionnaire was administered to all clinical staff addressing current screening practices as well as opinions regarding the importance and feasibility of identification and treatment of PSD.
Of 123 patients, 40 (32.5%) had been prescribed antidepressants at discharge. However, evidence of screening was found for 4.9% of patients; another 9.8% were referred for psychological consult. Treatment was associated with previous antidepressant use or history of depression, but not screening or assessment. Of the survey respondents, 56.2% were not aware of best practice recommendations. However, most felt screening and assessment to be important and treatment was regarded as both simple and effective.
Despite potential benefit associated with identification and treatment of PSD and the availability of evidence-based best practice recommendations, PSD may remain unrecognized and undertreated. Given the juxtaposition of perceived importance with the lack of documented best practice, education regarding standardized screening and the development of consistent clinical protocols including roles and responsibilities in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of PSD are underway.
PubMed ID
22436361 View in PubMed
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Adverse events among Winnipeg Home Care clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166703
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9 Spec No:127-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Keir G Johnson
Author Affiliation
Division of Research and Applied Learning, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. kjohnson1@wrha.mb.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9 Spec No:127-34
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Home Care Agencies
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Medical Audit
Medication Errors - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Safety Management
Abstract
Patient safety research has focused almost exclusively on hospitals, with few studies investigating the safety of other healthcare sectors, including home care. Before measuring patient safety in home care, this study first sought to translate hospital-focused patient safety definitions and concepts to home care. A context-appropriate approach to measuring adverse events (AEs) in home care was developed using chart reviews prompted by a mixed screening process. These methods were then applied to measure the incidence, type, severity, cause, preventability and ameliorability of AEs among Winnipeg Home Care clients.
PubMed ID
17087182 View in PubMed
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Age-related discrimination in the use of fibrinolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54778
Source
Age Ageing. 1995 May;24(3):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
K I Pettersen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Age Ageing. 1995 May;24(3):198-203
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Care Rationing - trends
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Thrombolytic Therapy - contraindications - utilization
Abstract
Age-related use of fibrinolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction was studied for patients admitted to the intensive care unit in four hospitals comprising 10% of the national hospital bed capacity in Norway. Altogether, 446 patients were included. All had validated acute myocardial infarction or acute ischaemic coronary heart disease treated with fibrinolytic medication. The fibrinolytic treatment rate decreased linearly from 74% among patients younger than 50 years to 15% among those older than 80 (p
PubMed ID
7645438 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.