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521 records – page 1 of 53.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Nov 17;165(47):4513-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2003
Author
Birgit Bødker
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk-obstetrisk Afdeling, Hillerød Sygehus, DK-3400 Hillerød.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Nov 17;165(47):4513-5
Date
Nov-17-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Humans
Medical Audit
Obstetrics - standards
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
14677225 View in PubMed
Less detail

Auditing surgical outcome: ten years with the Swedish Vascular Registry--Swedvasc. The Steering Committee of Swedvasc.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204442
Source
Eur J Surg Suppl. 1998;(581):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
D. Bergqvist
T. Troëng
J. Elfström
B. Hedberg
K G Ljungström
L. Norgren
P. Ortenwall
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg Suppl. 1998;(581):3-8
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Audit
Registries
Sweden
Vascular Surgical Procedures - standards
PubMed ID
9755403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Studies of avoidable factors influencing death: a call for explicit criteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211293
Source
Qual Health Care. 1996 Sep;5(3):159-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
R. Westerling
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Qual Health Care. 1996 Sep;5(3):159-65
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Humans
Medical Audit
Mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To analyse studies evaluating cases of potentially "avoidable" death.
The definitions, sources of information, and methods were reviewed with a structured protocol. The different types of avoidable factors,--that is, deficiencies in medical care that may have contributed to death--were categorised. The presence of explicit classifications and standards was examined. basic criteria for quality of the studies were defined and the numbers of studies fulfilling these criteria were assessed.
65 studies, published during 1988-93 in peer reviewed medical journal for which the title, or abstract, or both indicated that they had analysed potentially avoidable factors influencing death. Studies analysing aggregated data only, were not included.
Only one third of the studies fulfilled basic quality criteria,--namely, that the avoidable factors examined should be defined and the sources of information and people responsible for the judgements presented. The definitions used comprised two levels, one stating that there had been errors in management (process) and the other that the errors may have contributed to the deaths (outcome). Only 15% of the studies explicitly defined what type of factors they had looked for and 8% referred to specified standards of care.
Studies of avoidable factors influencing death may have considerable potential as part of a system of improving medical care and reducing avoidable mortality. At present, however, the results from different studies are not comparable, due to differences in materials and methods. There is a need to improve the quality of the studies and to define standardised explicit definitions and classifications.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10161530 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perinatal mortality in Norway: experience with perinatal audit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59708
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1991 Aug 20;41(1):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1991
Author
B. Stray-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Aker University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1991 Aug 20;41(1):20-2
Date
Aug-20-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Medical Audit
Norway
Abstract
In order to improve perinatal service, special committees have been established in every county in Norway. These committees are responsible for making local guidelines and performing inquiries (audits) of all perinatal deaths. The focusing upon avoidable and possibly avoidable factors and identification of suboptimal care seems to be valuable in improving the quality of medical work. In 1989 the perinatal mortality was 7.8 per 1000 births.
PubMed ID
1748219 View in PubMed
Less detail

Audit reviewed: medical audit in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239494
Source
J R Coll Physicians Lond. 1985 Jan;19(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
W. van't Hoff
Source
J R Coll Physicians Lond. 1985 Jan;19(1):53-5
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
United States
PubMed ID
3973843 View in PubMed
Less detail

A multilayered approach for the analysis of perinatal mortality using different classification systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89727
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009 Jun;144(2):99-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Gordijn Sanne J
Korteweg Fleurisca J
Erwich Jan Jaap H M
Holm Jozien P
van Diem Mariet Th
Bergman Klasien A
Timmer Albertus
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2009 Jun;144(2):99-104
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Classification
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Audit
Perinatal mortality
Abstract
Many classification systems for perinatal mortality are available, all with their own strengths and weaknesses: none of them has been universally accepted. We present a systematic multilayered approach for the analysis of perinatal mortality based on information related to the moment of death, the conditions associated with death and the underlying cause of death, using a combination of representatives of existing classification systems. We compared the existing classification systems regarding their definition of the perinatal period, level of complexity, inclusion of maternal, foetal and/or placental factors and whether they focus at a clinical or pathological viewpoint. Furthermore, we allocated the classification systems to one of three categories: 'when', 'what' or 'why', dependent on whether the allocation of the individual cases of perinatal mortality is based on the moment of death ('when'), the clinical conditions associated with death ('what'), or the underlying cause of death ('why'). A multilayered approach for the analysis and classification of perinatal mortality is possible by using combinations of existing systems; for example the Wigglesworth or Nordic Baltic ('when'), ReCoDe ('what') and Tulip ('why') classification systems. This approach is useful not only for in depth analysis of perinatal mortality in the developed world but also for analysis of perinatal mortality in the developing countries, where resources to investigate death are often limited.
PubMed ID
19272694 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acknowledgement of errors is part of the core of quality assurance: "To err is human, mistakes are made even in patient care..."].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225679
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 18;88(38):3082-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-1991
Author
T. Troëng
U. Sjöblom
H. Forsell
Author Affiliation
Kirurgiska kliniken, centrallasarettet, Karlskrona.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 18;88(38):3082-4
Date
Sep-18-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diagnostic Errors
Humans
Malpractice
Medical Audit
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
1921599 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2017 Feb 13;114
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-2017
Author
Thomas Brezicka
Source
Lakartidningen. 2017 Feb 13;114
Date
Feb-13-2017
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Audit
Medical Errors - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records
Sweden
PubMed ID
28195631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inter-observer agreement in audit of quality of radiology requests and reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177907
Source
Clin Radiol. 2004 Nov;59(11):1018-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
K. Stavem
T. Foss
O. Botnmark
O K Andersen
J. Erikssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Akershus University Hospital, Nordbyhagen, Norway. knut.stavem@klinmed.uio.no
Source
Clin Radiol. 2004 Nov;59(11):1018-24
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Audit
Medical Records - standards
Norway
Observer Variation
Radiology - standards
Abstract
To assess the quality of the imaging procedure requests and radiologists' reports using an auditing tool, and to assess the agreement between different observers of the quality parameters.
In an audit using a standardized scoring system, three observers reviewed request forms for 296 consecutive radiological examinations, and two observers reviewed a random sample of 150 of the corresponding radiologists' reports. We present descriptive statistics from the audit and pairwise inter-observer agreement, using the proportion agreement and kappa statistics.
The proportion of acceptable item scores (0 or +1) was above 70% for all items except the requesting physician's bleep or extension number, legibility of the physician's name, or details about previous investigations. For pairs of observers, the inter-observer agreement was generally high, however, the corresponding kappa values were consistently low with only 14 of 90 ratings >0.60 and 6 >0.80 on the requests/reports. For the quality of the clinical information, the appropriateness of the request, and the requested priority/timing of the investigation items, the mean percentage agreement ranged 67-76, and the corresponding kappa values ranged 0.08-0.24.
The inter-observer reliability of scores on the different items showed a high degree of agreement, although the kappa values were low, which is a well-known paradox. Current routines for requesting radiology examinations appeared satisfactory, although several problem areas were identified.
PubMed ID
15488851 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mapping nurses' natural language to oncology patients' symptom expressions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79824
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:987-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Rotegård Ann Kristin
Slaughter Laura
Ruland Cornelia M
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making and Nursing Research, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet HF, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;122:987-8
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Language
Medical Audit
Medical Oncology
Norway
Nursing Care
Nursing Diagnosis
Abstract
Systems that integrate information from both the patients and health professionals require bi-directional term translation. We manually extracted nursing terms from 25 randomly selected cancer patients' charts that expressed symptoms and mapped these to a set of patient-oriented symptoms from a cancer support system. We found that 40% of the nursing terms were synonyms of patient expressions that could be mapped directly; however 38% of the nursing terms required a map to more than one patient expression. In this study, we gained an understanding of the link between nursing and patient language that is needed for future system development.
PubMed ID
17102502 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.