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[Analysis of outbreak of anthrax in Omsk region in 2010].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118862
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
A N Kulichenko
A G Riazanova
Iu V Demina
A S Kriga
E I Eremenko
O I Tsygankova
E A Tsygankova
N P Buravtseva
L Iu Aksenova
T M Golovinskaia
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthrax - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Bacillus anthracis - genetics - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Horse Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Horses
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Russia - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Carrying out analysis of epizootologic-epidemiologic situation on anthrax that had emerged in Omsk region in 2010 when horse meat from epizootic focus of anthrax was used in production of meat semi-finished products.
Study of samples for detection of anthrax causative agents and strain identification was performed according to guidelines 1.3.2569-09. Strain genotyping was performed by MLVA method.
The epizootologic-epidemiologic investigation performed allowed to detect the causes of emergence of anthrax outbreak, its routes and factors of transmission. MLVA genotyping results gave evidence on the single origin of Bacillus anthracis strains isolated from sick animals, humans and food substances.
Timely execution of a complex of epizootic and epidemic control measures allowed to localize epizootic and epidemic focus of anthrax as well as prevent a possible large scale development of epidemic complications.
PubMed ID
23163033 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Escherichia coli O103:H25 - bacteriological investigations and genotyping of isolates from food.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150192
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Aug 15;133(3):259-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2009
Author
Camilla Sekse
Kristin O'Sullivan
Per Einar Granum
Liv Marit Rørvik
Yngvild Wasteson
Hannah Joan Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Aug 15;133(3):259-64
Date
Aug-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Colony Count, Microbial
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Fermentation
Food Microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Sheep - microbiology
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
During the spring of 2006, a national disease outbreak caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O103:H25 was investigated in Norway. At the time of the outbreak the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science was the national reference laboratory for E. coli O157 in food, and the microbiological investigations to identify the food source were performed there. Food- and environmental samples (n=931) were collected by the Norwegian Food Safety Authorities following two different hypotheses i) that minced meat was the source of STEC, and ii) that fermented sausage was the source of STEC. Twenty seven food samples, all collected following the latter hypothesis contained eae-positive E. coli O103:H25, but none of these were stx-positive. By PFGE it was shown that isolates from one particular type of fermented sausage "morr sausage 1" were identical to the isolates from patients. Samples of sheep meat that were linked epidemiologically to meat used for sausage production also contained isolates identical or closely related to patient strains. The presented study underpins epidemiological indications that fermented sausage was the source of the outbreak, but points specifically to one particular brand of sausage as the source.
PubMed ID
19540608 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 caused by beef sausage, Denmark 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83798
Source
Euro Surveill. 2007 May;12(5):E070531.4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007

Applicability of biological time temperature integrators as quality and safety indicators for meat products.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146076
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Mar 31;138(1-2):119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2010
Author
M. Ellouze
J-C Augustin
Author Affiliation
CRYOLOG SA Département R&D. 58, Nantes, France. mellouze@vet-alfort.fr
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Mar 31;138(1-2):119-29
Date
Mar-31-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology - standards
Oxygen - metabolism
Poultry Products - microbiology - standards
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate (eO), a biological time temperature integrator (TTI) as a quality and safety indicator for ground beef packed under modified atmosphere and spiced cooked chicken slices packed under modified atmosphere. Storage trials and challenge tests were thus performed on several batches of the studied food to monitor and model the behavior of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and the indigenous food flora. Then, two different prototypes of the TTI (eO) were set and manufactured according to the studied products shelf lives. The TTI evolution with time at static and dynamic temperatures was monitored and modeled. Finally, exposure assessment models were set and used under several realistic storage profiles to assess the distributions of the concentration of the indigenous food flora and the distributions of the increase in the pathogens populations obtained at the end of the product shelf life or at the end point of the TTI, taking into account the TTIs batch variability. Results showed that in case of poor storage conditions, TTI can reduce the consumer exposure to altered or hazardous foods.
PubMed ID
20074826 View in PubMed
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Bacterial contamination of animal feed and its relationship to human foodborne illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51655
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):859-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2002
Author
John A Crump
Patricia M Griffin
Frederick J Angulo
Author Affiliation
Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. jcrump@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):859-65
Date
Oct-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - microbiology
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Disease Outbreaks
Food Contamination
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Salmonella enterica
Sweden
Typhoid Fever - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Animal feed is at the beginning of the food safety chain in the "farm-to-fork" model. The emergence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has raised awareness of the importance of contaminated animal feed, but less attention has been paid to the role of bacterial contamination of animal feed in human foodborne illness. In the United States, animal feed is frequently contaminated with non-Typhi serotypes of Salmonella enterica and may lead to infection or colonization of food animals. These bacteria can contaminate animal carcasses at slaughter or cross-contaminate other food items, leading to human illness. Although tracing contamination to its ultimate source is difficult, several large outbreaks have been traced back to contaminated animal feed. Improvements in the safety of animal feed should include strengthening the surveillance of animal feed for bacterial contamination and integration of such surveillance with human foodborne disease surveillance systems. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point program should be instituted for the animal feed industry, and a Salmonella-negative policy for feed should be enforced.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Apr 1;36(7):933-4; author reply 934-512652398
PubMed ID
12228823 View in PubMed
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Behavior of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus in Chouri├žo de Vinho, a dry fermented sausage made from wine-marinated meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114836
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J García Díez
L. Patarata
Author Affiliation
Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Centre of Studies in Animal and Veterinary Science, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal.
Source
J Food Prot. 2013 Apr;76(4):588-94
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Fermentation
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods
Food Microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella - growth & development
Staphylococcus aureus - growth & development
Abstract
Portuguese chouriço de vinho is made by drying coarsely minced meat and fat that has been previously marinated with wine (usually red), salt, and garlic for 1 to 2 days at a low temperature (4 to 8 °C). This procedure may improve the microbiological safety of the product. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of three pathogens in this product, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, to establish the minimum period of drying and maturation necessary to render safe products. The pathogens were inoculated in the chouriço de vinho batter. A factorial design was used to study the following variables in the fermentation process: (i) the presence or absence of an indigenous Lactobacillus sakei starter culture; (ii) the presence or absence of fermentable carbohydrates; and (iii) the salt level (1.5 or 3%). The samples were analyzed 24 h after the preparation of the batter (at stuffing); after 7, 15, and 30 days of drying; and after 30 days of storage at 4 °C under vacuum. Under all of the conditions studied, the levels of the three pathogens decreased during the drying period. In the early stages of drying, the addition of L. sakei starter culture and/or carbohydrates resulted in lower levels of gram-positive pathogens. After 15 days of drying, populations of all pathogens decreased by ca. 2 log in all samples. At that sampling time, L. monocytogenes was undetectable in the chouriço de vinho with L. sakei starter culture and carbohydrates. The mean count of S. aureus after 15 days of drying was below 1 log CFU/g. After 30 days of drying, no pathogens were detected. The drying period could be shortened to 15 days when considering only the gram-positive pathogens studied and the use of a starter culture and carbohydrates. Due to the low infective dose of Salmonella spp., the product should be considered safe after 30 days, when this pathogen became undetectable.
PubMed ID
23575119 View in PubMed
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Characterization of the emerging Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- in Danish animal production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258914
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 May;11(5):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Hector Argüello
Gitte Sørensen
Ana Carvajal
Dorte Lau Baggesen
Pedro Rubio
Karl Pedersen
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2014 May;11(5):366-72
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacteriophage Typing - methods
Cattle
Cephalosporins - pharmacology
Cloning, Molecular
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
Fluoroquinolones - pharmacology
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Microbiology
Genetic Loci
Meat Products - microbiology
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Minisatellite Repeats
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Poultry
Salmonella - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Serotyping - methods
Swine
Abstract
The monophasic Salmonella variant with the antigenic formula Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- has emerged in the last decade as one of the main serotypes related to human salmonellosis. In the present study, a collection of 94 isolates of the S. 4,12:i:- and S. 4,5,12:i:- coming from Danish farm animals, swine (86), cattle (7), and poultry (1), with well-defined identification was further typed by polymerase chain reaction serotyping, phage typing, and molecular typing (polymerase chain reaction and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis [MLVA]). Moreover, the determination of antimicrobial resistance pattern of each isolate was tested. In 68 of the isolates the fljB gene was absent (i.e., they were true monophasic strains), whereas in 26 isolates, the gene was present despite the fact that the isolates did not express it. The results clustered the isolates in three main pulse-types. The predominant cluster was compatible with the previously described pattern STYMXB.0131. All the isolates included in this cluster lacked the fljB gene, and all the isolates except one belonged to phage type DT 193 with the AMP-STR-SMX-TET resistance pattern. MLVA analysis divided the clusters in several MLVA profiles previously reported by other studies. Finally, antimicrobial resistance and multiresistance was frequent, although no resistance was detected in critical compounds: fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. The present study demonstrates the presence of monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium-like strains in Danish food animal production with well-characterized clones that are described by previous studies, demonstrating the emergence and spread of this serotype in Denmark.
PubMed ID
24673107 View in PubMed
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Clostridium difficile in retail ground meat, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163156
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Mar;13(3):485-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios
Henry R Staempfli
Todd Duffield
J Scott Weese
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Studies, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. arodrigu@uoguelph.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Mar;13(3):485-7
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Toxins - metabolism
Canada
Cattle
Clostridium Infections - prevention & control
Clostridium difficile - classification - isolation & purification - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Food Microbiology
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Species Specificity
Abstract
Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12 (20%) of 60 retail ground meat samples purchased over a 10-month period in 2005 in Canada. Eleven isolates were toxigenic, and 8 (67%) were classified as toxinotype III. The human health implications of this finding are unclear, but with the virulence of toxinotype III strains further studies are required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17552108 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.