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801 records – page 1 of 81.

4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

[About the human health safety estimation of ractopamine intake together with the food].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105651
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2013;(6):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
G G Onishchenko
A Iu Popova
V A Tutel'ian
N V Zaitseva
S A Khotimchenko
I V Gmoshinskii
S A Sheveleva
V N Rakitskii
P Z Shur
A B Lisitsyn
D A Kir'ianov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2013;(6):4-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - pharmacology
Animals
Growth Substances
Health status
Humans
Meat - analysis - utilization
Phenethylamines - chemistry - pharmacology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The analysis of scientific data including American and European scientific communities concerning use of ractopamine as a growth factor in food animal production and the argumentation of the maximum permitted levels of ractopamine and levels of ractopamine in meat and byproducts (offal) is carried out. The position of the Russian side stated at the Codex Alimentarius commission 35th session that acceptable ractopamine daily intake is insufficiently validated and cannot be used for the determination of maximum permitted levels of ractopamine in meat and byproducts (offal) is confirmed. It is represented that residual ractopamine intake together with food on the levels which are recommended by the Codex Alimentarius commission and by taking into account the levels of animal products consumption in Russian Federation will lead to unacceptable human health risk level that will promote increasing heart diseases and life expectancy reduction. In this connection Russia states against of acceptance of maximum permitted levels of ractopamine in food.
PubMed ID
24340628 View in PubMed
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Adopting control principles in a novel setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83051
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2006 Feb 25;112(2-4):265-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2006
Author
Wahlström Helene
Englund Lena
Author Affiliation
Department of Disease Control and Biosecurity, Zoonosis Center, National Veterinary Institute, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden. helene.wahlstrom@sva.se
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2006 Feb 25;112(2-4):265-71
Date
Feb-25-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - standards
Animals
Cattle
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Deer
Meat - microbiology
Mycobacterium bovis - isolation & purification
Population Surveillance - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculin Test - veterinary
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control - veterinary
Abstract
The paper describes the introduction of Mycobacterium bovis into Swedish deer herds and its possible consequences. The different control strategies applied are summarized as well as their shortcomings under the conditions of the Swedish outbreak. An alternative control, to be used in extensive deer herds, based only on slaughter and meat inspection is described. Finally, the efficiency of the implemented control and surveillance systems are discussed and possible improvements suggested.
PubMed ID
16325356 View in PubMed
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Age differences in vitamin A intake among Canadian Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4748
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Grace M Egeland
Peter Berti
Rula Soueida
Laura T Arbour
Olivier Receveur
Harriet V Kuhnlein
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC. grace.egeland@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):465-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Nutritional Requirements
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Inuit traditional food provides ample amounts of preformed vitamin A. However, the dietary transition away from traditional food raises concerns regarding dietary adequacy. Vitamin A is an essential nutrient with inadequate and excessive exposures having adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate total dietary vitamin A intake for Canadian Inuit from market food and traditional food sources and to evaluate retinol concentrations in liver and blubber. METHODS: Dietary surveys were conducted in 18 communities representing 5 Inuit regions, and traditional food items were evaluated for nutrient content. RESULTS: Among those 15-40 years of age, 68% of men and 60% of women had a dietary vitamin A intake below the estimated average requirement (EAR) for retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/day. Among those over 40 years of age, only 11 % of men and 15% of women had a dietary vitamin A intake below the EAR. Young Inuit men had a relative risk of 6.2 (95% CI= 4.5-8.4), and young Inuit women had a relative risk of 4.0 (95% CI= 3.1-5.0) for dietary inadequacy compared to the older Inuit men and women, respectively. The median retinol content of liver of ringed seal, caribou, and fish were comparable to levels observed in market food liver. Liver was less frequently consumed by those 15-40 years of age than among older Inuit. DISCUSSION: Sub-optimal vitamin A intake is the predominant nutritional concern rather than excessive exposures. Public health education campaigns are needed to improve vitamin A intake among the younger generations of Inuit men and women.
PubMed ID
15622799 View in PubMed
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Ageing Cattle: The Use of Radiographic Examinations on Cattle Metapodials from Eketorp Ringfort on the Island of Ă–land in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273180
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Ylva Telldahl
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137109
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Determination by Skeleton - methods
Agriculture - history - methods
Animal Husbandry - history - methods
Animals
Cattle - growth & development
Cattle Diseases - history - radiography
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - history - radiography - veterinary
Female
History, Ancient
Islands
Male
Meat
Metatarsal Bones - growth & development - radiography
Radiometric Dating
Sex Factors
Sweden
Waste Disposal Facilities
Abstract
In this paper conventional X-ray analysis of cattle metapodials is used to study the age structure of slaughtered cattle at Eketorp ringfort on the island of Öland, Sweden. The X-ray analyses suggest that several animals in both phases were slaughtered aged 4-8 years. More oxen/bulls than cows reached the advanced age of over 8 years, yet in phase III more oxen/bulls seem to have been slaughtered between the ages of 2 and 8 years. These differences may reflect a change in demand for meat related to the character of the site. The results also show a correlation between metapodials with a pathology connected to biomechanical stress and older animals. This suggests that male cattle were used both in meat production and as draught animals. Asymmetry in male metatarsals such as distal broadening of the lateral part of the medial trochlea was visible on the X-ray images. The bone element also indicates a denser outer cortex of the medial diaphysis in comparison to the inner medulla. This could be the result of repetitive mechanical stress. Two metatarsals from cows were documented with distal asymmetry indicating that cows were also used as working animals. Bone elements with changes in the articular surfaces were more common in metapodials from cows with an X-ray age of over 3-4 years. These results highlighted the slaughter age difference between oxen/bulls and cows, enabling a better understanding of animal husbandry and the selection of draught cattle at Eketorp ringfort.
Notes
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Cites: Br J Nutr. 1983 Nov;50(3):711-226639928
PubMed ID
26336086 View in PubMed
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801 records – page 1 of 81.