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20 records – page 1 of 2.

An update on an ongoing measles outbreak in Bulgaria, April-November 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146096
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
L. Marinova
M. Muscat
Z. Mihneva
M. Kojouharova
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria. Lmarinova@ncipd.org
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Vaccination - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Earlier this year, an outbreak of measles was detected in Bulgaria, following an eight-year period without indigenous measles transmission, and continues to spread in the country. By the end of 48 week of 2009 (first week of November), 957 measles cases had been recorded. Most cases are identified among the Roma community living in the north-eastern part of the country. Measles has affected infants, children and young adults. The vaccination campaign that started earlier in the year in the affected administrative regions continues, targeting all individuals from 13 months to 30 years of age who have not received the complete two-dose regimen of the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination.
Notes
Comment In: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50). pii: 1944920070940
PubMed ID
20070938 View in PubMed
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Cost-benefit studies of vaccinations in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247925
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1979;43:419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
O. Elo
Source
Dev Biol Stand. 1979;43:419-28
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Measles - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
Rubella - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - therapeutic use
Vaccination - economics
Viral Vaccines - therapeutic use
Abstract
The benefits of vaccination are, in general, recognized. For some diseases these benefits are obvious. When starting or evaluating new vaccination programmes, a more critical approach is needed. Before starting vaccination against measles and rubella in Finland a cost-benefit study was performed. According to those studies the net benefits of each vaccination would be ca. 100 million Finnish marks in 25-30 years. Those benefits not measurable in money value of human life, decrease of suffering, etc., were not included. For the purpose of formulating the national influenza vaccination policy a similar study was performed on influenza. The method used before seemed to be less suitable, however, with certain assumptions the vaccinations against influenza proved to be profitable.
PubMed ID
118069 View in PubMed
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[Dynamics of activity of blood alkaline phosphatase during immunization with CDS vaccine in children with various health conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44910
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1966 Sep-Oct;5:19-22
Publication Type
Article

[Epidemiological and immunological study of the foci of measles infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249628
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Sep;(9):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977
Author
A I Zargar'iants
L P Zemilova
V M Bolotovskií
N S Titova
G G Vurzel'
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Sep;(9):16-20
Date
Sep-1977
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunity, Active
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - immunology
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Moscow
School Health Services
Abstract
Anamnestic data in respect to measles failed to correspond to the results of serological examination of contacts at the foci of the given infection. The collective immunity level in children's institutions is inadequate for the prevention of measles outbreaks. The incidence of the disease depended both on the level of immunity among the children and on the duration of presence of the source of infection in the focus. Live measles vaccine protected 90 percent of the vaccinated children from contracting the disease in the foci. At the very beginning of the postvaccinal period immunization defects were revealed in 26.5 percent of the vaccinated children who fell ill with measles. Morbidity index among the vaccinated individuals constituted 3.8 percent. One of the causes of measles contraction by the vaccinated individuals was the loss of postvaccinal immunity. Systematic control over the antimeasles immunity level with the aid of serological investigations is necessary for the purpose of detection of persons sensitive to measles in children's collective bodies.
PubMed ID
596019 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiologic and economic effects of measles vaccinations in the Zaporozhsk region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57997
Source
Feldsher Akush. 1973 Feb;38(2):9-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1973

Increase of vaccination coverage by mass media and individual approach: intensified measles, mumps, and rubella prevention program in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226232
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Jun 1;133(11):1152-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1991
Author
M. Paunio
M. Virtanen
H. Peltola
K. Cantell
P. Paunio
M. Valle
V. Karanko
O P Heinonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Jun 1;133(11):1152-60
Date
Jun-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Combinations
Finland
Humans
Mass Media
Measles - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - therapeutic use
Rubella - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - therapeutic use
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In the 1970s, mass vaccination projects were started in various parts of the world against measles and congenital rubella, with eradication as the final goal. In many developing and industrial countries, including Finland, the elimination of measles failed because of low vaccination coverage. In Finland, a combined measles, mumps, and rubella (Virivac) vaccination program was started in 1982. Computerized recording of the vaccinated children was considered necessary and was integrated with the population registry to identify the hard-to-reach families. Several interventions improved compliance: a mass media campaign and notification of nonvaccinated children to local health professionals and parents. All successive campaigns increased vaccination coverage significantly, with the notification of parents about their nonvaccinated child being especially effective. A vaccination coverage of over 96% was achieved, which theoretically prevents measles, mumps, and rubella transmission.
PubMed ID
2035518 View in PubMed
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Long-lasting measles outbreak affecting several unrelated networks of unvaccinated persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147967
Source
J Infect Dis. 2009 Nov 15;200(10):1602-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2009
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Gaston De Serres
François-William Tremblay
France Markowski
Graham Tipples
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, PQ, Canada.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2009 Nov 15;200(10):1602-5
Date
Nov-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Contact Tracing
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Immunity, Herd
Male
Measles - epidemiology - genetics
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Molecular Sequence Data
Quebec - epidemiology
Treatment Refusal
Young Adult
Abstract
Despite a population immunity level estimated at approximately 95%, an outbreak of measles responsible for 94 cases occurred in Quebec, Canada. Unlike previous outbreaks in which most unvaccinated children belonged to a single community, this outbreak had cases coming from several unrelated networks of unvaccinated persons dispersed in the population. No epidemiological link was found for about one-third of laboratory-confirmed cases. This outbreak demonstrated that minimal changes in the level of aggregation of unvaccinated individuals can lead to sustained transmission in highly vaccinated populations. Mathematical work is needed regarding the level of aggregation of unvaccinated individuals that would jeopardize elimination.
PubMed ID
19827945 View in PubMed
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Source
Vopr Okhr Materin Det. 1974 Dec;19(12):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1974
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 2008;62(2):219-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Stefanoff Pawel
Czarkowski Miroslaw P
Kondej Barbara
Author Affiliation
Zaklad Epidemiologii, Narodowy Instytut Zdrowia Publicznego - Panstwowy Zaklad Higieny, ul. Chocimska 24, 00-791 Warszawa. pstefanoff@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 2008;62(2):219-24
Date
2008
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Poland - epidemiology
Risk factors
Serologic Tests - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In Poland 120 measles cases were registered in 2006 (0.31 per 100,000 population). It was a substantial increase, compared to the years 2002-2005, when the number of locally-acquired cases was inferior to 1 case per 1 000 000 inhabitants. Three cases were linked to a large Ukrainian outbreak, including the 2006 index case on the Polish territory. Out of 106 cases with vaccination history available, 62 (58%) were not vaccinated, 26 (25%) were fully vaccinated (including 16 laboratory confirmed), and 18 (17%)--incompletely vaccinated. The most affected age groups were children under 2 years of age (incidence 2.62 per 100,000 population), 5-year olds (1.08), and adults aged 25-29 years (1.09). In 20 cases complications were seen, including pneumonia (n = 10) and otitis media (n = 6). 75 measles cases (63%) were hospitalized, no deaths were recorded. The 2006 outbreak lead to a substantial improvement of measles surveillance performance. Two hundred eighty-nine suspect cases were reported, of which 252 (89%) were tested serologically for measles. Additionally, molecular testing of suspect cases was introduced in 2006. The first isolated virus strains belong to the D4 and D5 genotypes, not related to the Ukrainian outbreak. In order to properly document measles elimination during following year, high sensitivity of rash-like illness surveillance should be maintained, and isolation of viral strains from each chain of infection should be attempted.
PubMed ID
18807460 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.