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129 records – page 1 of 13.

Absence of transmission of the d9 measles virus--Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186090
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2003
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Date
Mar-21-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - genetics
Abstract
In 1994, countries of the Region of the Americas set a goal of interrupting indigenous measles transmission, and the regional plan of action for achieving this goal was begun in 1996. As of March 16, 2003, the Region of the Americas has been free for 17 weeks from known circulation of the d9 measles virus, the strain responsible for the only large outbreak of measles in the region during 2002 (Figure).
PubMed ID
12665116 View in PubMed
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Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89798
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Rosenlund Helen
Bergström Anna
Alm Johan S
Swartz Jackie
Scheynius Annika
van Hage Marianne
Johansen Kari
Brunekreef Bert
von Mutius Erika
Ege Markus J
Riedler Josef
Braun-Fahrländer Charlotte
Waser Marco
Pershagen Göran
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. helen.rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthroposophy
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Life Style
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in Children Related to Farming and Anthroposophic Lifestyle study, conducted in 5 European countries (Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland). The children were between 5 and 13 years of age and represented farm children, Steiner-school children, and 2 reference groups. Children attending Steiner schools often have an anthroposophic (holistic) lifestyle in which some immunizations are avoided or postponed. Parental questionnaires provided information on exposure and lifestyle factors as well as symptoms and diagnoses in the children. A sample of the children was invited for additional tests, and 4049 children provided a blood sample for immunoglobulin E analyses. Only children with complete information on measles vaccination and infection were included in the analyses (84%). RESULTS: In the whole group of children, atopic sensitization was inversely associated with measles infection, and a similar tendency was seen for measles vaccination. To reduce risks of disease-related modification of exposure, children who reported symptoms of wheezing and/or eczema debuting during first year of life were excluded from some analyses. After this exclusion, inverse associations were observed between measles infection and "any allergic symptom" and "any diagnosis of allergy by a physician." However, no associations were found between measles vaccination and allergic disease. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that measles infection may protect against allergic disease in children.
PubMed ID
19255001 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of measles in a vaccinated community--a new situation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288218
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 12;87(50):4298, 4303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1990

[An outbreak of measles in a vaccinated community--a new situation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37450
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Dec 12;87(50):4298, 4303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1990

Association of infectious mononucleosis with multiple sclerosis. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152691
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;32(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sreeram V Ramagopalan
William Valdar
David A Dyment
Gabriele C DeLuca
Irene M Yee
Gavin Giovannoni
George C Ebers
A Dessa Sadovnick
Author Affiliation
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;32(4):257-62
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chickenpox - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chickenpox Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Infectious Mononucleosis - epidemiology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - etiology
Mumps - epidemiology - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Rubella - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage
Sex Factors
Abstract
Genetic and environmental factors have important roles in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. Several studies have attempted to correlate exposure to viral illness with the subsequent development of MS. Here in a population-based Canadian cohort, we investigate the relationship between prior clinical infection or vaccination and the risk of MS.
Using the longitudinal Canadian database, 14,362 MS index cases and 7,671 spouse controls were asked about history of measles, mumps, rubella, varicella and infectious mononucleosis as well as details about vaccination with measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B and influenza vaccines. Comparisons were made between cases and spouse controls.
Spouse controls and stratification by sex appear to correct for ascertainment bias because with a single exception we found no significant differences between cases and controls for all viral exposures and vaccinations. However, 699 cases and 165 controls reported a history of infectious mononucleosis (p
PubMed ID
19209005 View in PubMed
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[Basic indices of measles incidence in the years of mass inoculations with live measles vaccine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41378
Source
Vrach Delo. 1979 May;(5):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979

A benefit-cost analysis of two-dose measles immunization in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204970
Source
Vaccine. 1998 May-Jun;16(9-10):989-96
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Pelletier
P. Chung
P. Duclos
P. Manga
J. Scott
Author Affiliation
Division of Immunization, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control (LCDC), Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 1998 May-Jun;16(9-10):989-96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disease Outbreaks - economics - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Measles - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage - economics
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps - economics - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage - economics
Rubella - economics - prevention & control
Rubella Syndrome, Congenital - economics - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage - economics
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccines, Combined - administration & dosage - economics
Abstract
In 1992, because of the limitations of the one-dose measles immunization program, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommended a two-dose measles immunization program to eliminate measles. More recently, NACI recommended also a special catch-up program to prevent predicted measles outbreaks and to achieve an earlier elimination of measles. The objective of this study was to complete a benefit-cost analysis of a two-dose immunization program with and without a mass catch-up compaign compared with the current one-dose program. The resulting benefit: cost ratios vary between 2.61:1 and 4.31:1 depending on the strategy used and the age of the children targeted. Given the parameters established for this analysis, the benefits of a second-dose vaccination program against measles far outweight the costs of such a program under all scenarios.
PubMed ID
9682349 View in PubMed
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Cases of aseptic meningitis after vaccination against mumps in Russia (2009-2019).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305185
Source
Public Health. 2020 Sep; 186:8-11
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
I K Belyaletdinova
I V Mitrofanova
L I Kozlovskaya
G M Ignatyev
Author Affiliation
FSBSI "Chumakov FSC R&D IBP RAS", Moscow, Russia; Infectious Clinical Hospital No. 1, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: belyaletdinova_i@mail.ru.
Source
Public Health. 2020 Sep; 186:8-11
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immunization
Incidence
Male
Measles - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Meningitis, Aseptic - epidemiology - etiology
Mumps - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination
Vaccines, Combined
Viral vaccines
Abstract
Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection prevented by immunization with live attenuated vaccines. Mumps vaccines have proven to be safe and effective; however, rare cases of aseptic meningitis (AM) can occur after vaccination. The range of meningitis occurrence varies by different factors (strain, vaccine producer, and so on). Monovaccines or divaccines (mumps-measles vaccine), prepared from the strain Leningrad-3 (L-3), are used in Russia. Meningitis occurrence after vaccination has been established previously as very low. Nevertheless, with the number of children being vaccinated every year, vaccine-associated AM cases still occur. There is no official statistics on AM incidence after mumps vaccines, and information on AM features as an adverse event of mumps vaccination is limited and mostly devoted to vaccines, prepared from strains other than L-3.
The study included patients with AM who were vaccinated against mumps in the previous 30 days before the present disease onset during 2009-2019.
Patients admitted to Infectious Clinical Hospital No. 1, Moscow, Russia, with AM were observed by a pediatrician and were screened for etiological agents of meningitis.
Seven patients were enrolled, and clinical features and the course of infection are presented.
Detection of only 7 cases of AM associated with mumps vaccination during the 10-year period supports very low occurrence of this adverse event after immunization with the L-3 strain-based mumps vaccines. Nevertheless, the annual number of AM cases that occur after mumps vaccination remains unknown and poorly diagnosed in practice because of the low awareness of physicians of this adverse reaction. Detection and objective coverage of such cases can lead to a weakening of 'antivaccination' moods in a society and to restoration of confidence in the healthcare system.
PubMed ID
32736309 View in PubMed
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[Cases of measles in Denmark are caused by reintroduction of virus from abroad]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32200
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Apr 16;163(16):2244-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2001
Author
L S Christensen
S. Schöller
B. Rasmussen
L. Dahl
A M Plesner
H. Westh
I R Pedersen
C H Mordhorst
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, klinisk mikrobiologisk afdeling, Statens Serum Institut, epidemiologisk afdeling og virologisk afdeling, og Københavns Universitet, Institut for Medicinsk Mikrobiologi og Immunologi. siig@biobase.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Apr 16;163(16):2244-7
Date
Apr-16-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Measles vaccination was implemented in the child vaccination programme in Denmark in 1987 and produced a rapid decline in the incidence. Few cases were recorded annually until 1999. The measles virus isolated in Denmark during 1997-1998 was compared by partial sequencing of the haemagglutinin-coding region with Danish strains from the prevaccination era collected in 1965-1983, as well as with representatives of globally circulating strains of today. The dissimilarity of the prevaccination era strains identified in Denmark in 1997-1998 along with the similarity of these five strains with globally circulating strains at present, substantiate the conclusion that there is no persistent circulation of the measles virus in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11344660 View in PubMed
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Catch-up immunization programs will eliminate measles threat for most schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211881
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 15;154(10):1567-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1996
Author
J. Rafuse
Source
CMAJ. 1996 May 15;154(10):1567-8
Date
May-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Health Priorities
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Immunization, Secondary - methods
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage
Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Combined - administration & dosage
Abstract
The threat of measles will be eliminated for 72% of Canadian schoolchildren this spring as seven provinces/territories establish routine two-dose schedules for measles-mumps-rubella vaccination, including five jurisdictions that are undertaking universal catch-up immunization programs. The initiatives move the country closer to its commitment to eradicate measles by the year 2000.
PubMed ID
8625011 View in PubMed
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129 records – page 1 of 13.