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37 records – page 1 of 4.

Antibody-induced restriction of viral gene expression in measles encephalitis in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57791
Source
J Virol. 1990 Feb;64(2):706-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
U G Liebert
S. Schneider-Schaulies
K. Baczko
V. ter Meulen
Author Affiliation
Institut für Virologie und Immunbiologie, Universität Würzburg, Federal Republic of Germany.
Source
J Virol. 1990 Feb;64(2):706-13
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Antibody formation
Blotting, Northern
Brain - microbiology
Encephalitis - immunology - microbiology
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Viral
Genes, Viral
Measles - immunology
Measles virus - genetics - immunology - physiology
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Pregnancy
RNA Probes
RNA, Messenger - analysis - genetics
RNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spinal Cord - microbiology
Viral Structural Proteins - immunology
Virus Replication
Abstract
After infection with the neurotropic CAM/RBH measles virus (MV) strain, newborn Lewis rats succumb to an acute necrotizing encephalopathy. Passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed against MV hemagglutinin prevented this disease process. Instead, either an antibody-induced acute or subacute measles encephalitis developed after a prolonged incubation period with a restricted expression of MV structural proteins. The molecular biological analysis of MV gene expression in brain tissue of rats treated with MV-neutralizing antibodies revealed a transcriptional restriction of viral mRNAs, particularly for the envelope proteins, leading to a steep expression gradient. Based on in situ hybridization, it was concluded that the efficiency of transcription of viral genes at the single-cell level is reduced compared with that of controls. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies directed against other MV structural proteins proved to be ineffective. Similar results were obtained in MV-infected weanling Brown Norway rats. These rats developed a clinically silent encephalitis in the presence of high titers of neutralizing antibodies. In such animals, a pronounced attenuation of the viral gene transcription was observed. These findings indicated that neutralizing antibodies directed against a restricted set of specific antigenic sites on the viral hemagglutinin protein expressed on cell membranes exert a modulating effect on the viral gene expression at the level of transcription. This phenomenon contributes to the switch from the acute cytopathic effect to a persistent infection in the central nervous system.
PubMed ID
2296081 View in PubMed
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Antibody response to measles vaccination in Turkish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34888
Source
Infection. 1996 Mar-Apr;24(2):156-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
N. Kuyucu
U. Dogru
N. Akar
Author Affiliation
Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
Source
Infection. 1996 Mar-Apr;24(2):156-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibody formation
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Infant
Male
Measles - immunology
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Turkey
Abstract
In recent years, there has been a remarkable increase in measles cases among preschool and secondary school children in Turkey, as in many other countries. The seroconversion and coverage rates of measles vaccine should therefore be evaluated in order to obtain data that could be used to determine the vaccination policy for Turkey. Measles immunity status was studied by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) test determining the anti-measles IgG antibody levels. Measles specific IgG antibodies were found to be positive in 77.88% of the entire study group of 800 children aged 11 months to 12 years, while 21.25% had negative sera. Seven (0.87%) subjects had borderline results. The results of this study indicate the need to administer a second dose of measles vaccine, preferably at 18 months of age concomitant with other vaccines. This vaccination policy, together with an increase in the extent of immunization coverage, may help to achieve the World Health Organization's (WHO) target of the complete eradication of measles.
PubMed ID
8740111 View in PubMed
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Antibody status to poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, diphtheria and tetanus, Ontario, 1969-70: deficiencies discovered and remedies required.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251833
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):619-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1975
Author
D R MacLeod
W K Ing
R J Belcourt
E W Pearson
J S Bell
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Oct 4;113(7):619-23
Date
Oct-4-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies - analysis
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria - immunology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunity
Immunization
Infant
Measles - immunology
Ontario
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - immunology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral
Rubella - immunology
Tetanus - immunology
Abstract
A serologic survey was made in 15 health unit areas, testing some 5000 individuals in the age groups 4 to 6, 11 to 13, 15 to 17 and 23 to 45 years. Two types of serious deficiency were found. Only 65% of children 4 to 6 years old had antibodies to all three types of poliovirus, the antibodies being due almost entirely to immunization with Salk vaccine. Even in children who had had six or more doses only 74% had antibodies to the three types. The high percentage of students 11 to 13 and 15 to 17 years old with poliovirus antibodies can be attributed largely to natural infection and to Sabin vaccine in the mass campaign of 1962, as well as to Salk vaccine. In children who had received Sabin vaccine as well as Salk vaccine a very high level of immunity was found. The immunity of the school-age population will decline to an insufficient level unless Sabin vaccine is used after immunization with Salk vaccine. Of children 4 to 6 years old 18% had no diphtheria antitoxin and 6% had no tetanus antitoxin. Even in those who had had six or more doses of the antigens 5% had no diphtheria antitoxin and 1 to 2% had no tetanus antitoxin. This apparently refractory state is probably due to the use of unadsorbed toxoids, and it is clear that adsorbed toxoids should be used. In the adults, diphtheria antitoxin was found in only 55% and tetanus antitoxin in only 38%.
Notes
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1960 Apr;51:135-813837130
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1972;46(2):141-94537478
Cites: Lancet. 1969 Oct 11;2(7624):792-34186037
Cites: JAMA. 1969 Aug 25;209(8):1181-55819667
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1973 Jul-Aug;64(4):398-4024354331
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1973 Aug 2;289(5):231-54351596
Cites: Infect Immun. 1974 Jul;10(1):1-54842700
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1974 Mar-Apr;65(2):124-64826017
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1971 Oct 23;105(8):819-255170695
PubMed ID
1181016 View in PubMed
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Boosting effect of a second dose of measles vaccine given to 12-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36409
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):239-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M. Böttiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):239-43
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Drug Combinations
Female
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Infant
Male
Measles - immunology
Measles Vaccine
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps Vaccine
Rubella Vaccine
Sweden
Vaccination - methods
Abstract
In Sweden, a two-dose programme of vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) was introduced in 1982 and the target groups were children aged 18 months and 12 years. In 1993 the first age group of 12-year-olds that were vaccinated with MMR at 18 months will appear. The majority of the 12-year-old vaccines for many years, however, had already been vaccinated against measles and the MMR measles component was thus a booster dose. As the benefit of a booster dose against measles has been questioned, this was studied in a group of 163 12-year-old children, 122 of whom had been vaccinated against measles as young children. Of the 41 unvaccinated children, 23 had a history of clinical measles. The mean neutralizing titre level of the earlier vaccinated children, prior to the booster, was lower than that of the naturally immune children (reciprocal titre level 8 versus 20). After the booster the corresponding titre levels were 13 and 23. Among the seronegative children receiving their first dose, this figure amounted to 14. A moderate rise in titre was seen in those with low prevaccination titres. As the antibody protection afforded by vaccination was slightly lower than that of natural infection, even after a booster, follow-up studies must be recommended to evaluate the long-term protection of both a single and a two-dose programme.
PubMed ID
8511518 View in PubMed
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Immunity to measles before and after MMR booster or primary vaccination at 12 years of age in the first generation offered the 2-dose immunization programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33799
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1998;30(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K. Broliden
B. Levén
M. Arneborn
M. Böttiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Virology, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1998;30(1):23-7
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Immunization, Secondary
Infant
Measles - immunology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Measles virus - immunology
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps Vaccine - immunology
Neutralization Tests
Rubella Vaccine - immunology
Vaccines, Combined - immunology
Abstract
In 1982, a 2-dose regimen was introduced in Sweden for the combined vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) in children aged 18 months and 12 years. In 1993, blood samples from 378 12-year-old children, i.e. the first age-group receiving a MMR booster, were collected prior to and 2 months after the vaccination. 82% had a certificate of a previous measles (M) or MMR vaccination (group I). The remainder was classified as children with 'no documentation' (group II). In group I, 5 (1.5%) lacked demonstrable antibodies to measles prior to the booster; in group II this figure was 39%. The pre-booster antibody pattern was similar in M vaccinees and MMR vaccinees. After the vaccination, 1 of the 378 children was seronegative. In both groups, children with low pre-vaccination levels responded with a titre rise, in accordance with a similar study 6 years earlier.
PubMed ID
9670354 View in PubMed
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37 records – page 1 of 4.