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144 records – page 1 of 15.

Absence of transmission of the d9 measles virus--Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186090
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2003
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Date
Mar-21-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - genetics
Abstract
In 1994, countries of the Region of the Americas set a goal of interrupting indigenous measles transmission, and the regional plan of action for achieving this goal was begun in 1996. As of March 16, 2003, the Region of the Americas has been free for 17 weeks from known circulation of the d9 measles virus, the strain responsible for the only large outbreak of measles in the region during 2002 (Figure).
PubMed ID
12665116 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Sep;10(3):127
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1968
Author
P S Clark
Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Sep;10(3):127
Date
Sep-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Communicable disease control
Humans
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
5682220 View in PubMed
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Analysis of a measles epidemic; possible role of vaccine failures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251733
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1975
Author
W E Rawls
M L Rawls
M A Chernesky
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Date
Nov-22-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine
Ontario
Time Factors
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
A measles epidemic occurred in the Greensville (Ont.) Unit schools during January and February 1975. There were 47 cases of measles in 403 students: 26 (55%) of the children had a history of being vaccinated and 18 (38%) had not been vaccinated. Among children known to have been vaccinated at less than 1 year of age 7 of 13 contracted measles, while among the 48 children who had not been vaccinated 18 contracted measles. The attack rate among vaccinees increased with increasing time since vaccination. The observations of this study as well as those of similar studies suggest that vaccine failures contributed to the genesis of the epidemic. It is recommended that all children initially vaccinated at less than 1 year of age should be revaccinated with live attenuated measles virus vaccine.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1192310 View in PubMed
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Anti-science extremism in America: escalating and globalizing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304668
Source
Microbes Infect. 2020 Nov - Dec; 22(10):505-507
Publication Type
Editorial
Author
Peter J Hotez
Author Affiliation
Texas Children's Center for Vaccine Development, Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, TX, USA; Hagler Institute for Advanced Study at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA; Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA. Electronic address: hotez@bcm.edu.
Source
Microbes Infect. 2020 Nov - Dec; 22(10):505-507
Language
English
Publication Type
Editorial
Keywords
COVID-19 - immunology - prevention & control - psychology
Coronavirus Infections - immunology - prevention & control - psychology
Germany
Humans
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pandemics - prevention & control
Russia
United States
Vaccination - adverse effects - psychology
Vaccines - immunology
World Health Organization
Abstract
The last five years has seen a sharp rise in anti-science rhetoric in the United States, especially from the political far right, mostly focused on vaccines and, of late, anti-COVID-19 prevention approaches. Vaccine coverage has declined in more than 100 US counties leading to measles outbreaks in 2019, while in 2020 the US became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now the anti-science movement in America has begun to globalize, with new and unexpected associations with extremist groups and the potential for tragic consequences in terms of global public health. A new anti-science triumvirate has emerged, comprised of far right groups in the US and Germany, and amplified by Russian media.
PubMed ID
32961275 View in PubMed
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An update on an ongoing measles outbreak in Bulgaria, April-November 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146096
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
L. Marinova
M. Muscat
Z. Mihneva
M. Kojouharova
Author Affiliation
National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases, Sofia, Bulgaria. Lmarinova@ncipd.org
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50)
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Vaccination - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Earlier this year, an outbreak of measles was detected in Bulgaria, following an eight-year period without indigenous measles transmission, and continues to spread in the country. By the end of 48 week of 2009 (first week of November), 957 measles cases had been recorded. Most cases are identified among the Roma community living in the north-eastern part of the country. Measles has affected infants, children and young adults. The vaccination campaign that started earlier in the year in the affected administrative regions continues, targeting all individuals from 13 months to 30 years of age who have not received the complete two-dose regimen of the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination.
Notes
Comment In: Euro Surveill. 2009;14(50). pii: 1944920070940
PubMed ID
20070938 View in PubMed
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Association of infectious mononucleosis with multiple sclerosis. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152691
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;32(4):257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sreeram V Ramagopalan
William Valdar
David A Dyment
Gabriele C DeLuca
Irene M Yee
Gavin Giovannoni
George C Ebers
A Dessa Sadovnick
Author Affiliation
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2009;32(4):257-62
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chickenpox - epidemiology - prevention & control
Chickenpox Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Hepatitis B vaccines - administration & dosage
Humans
Infectious Mononucleosis - epidemiology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - etiology
Mumps - epidemiology - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Rubella - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage
Sex Factors
Abstract
Genetic and environmental factors have important roles in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. Several studies have attempted to correlate exposure to viral illness with the subsequent development of MS. Here in a population-based Canadian cohort, we investigate the relationship between prior clinical infection or vaccination and the risk of MS.
Using the longitudinal Canadian database, 14,362 MS index cases and 7,671 spouse controls were asked about history of measles, mumps, rubella, varicella and infectious mononucleosis as well as details about vaccination with measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B and influenza vaccines. Comparisons were made between cases and spouse controls.
Spouse controls and stratification by sex appear to correct for ascertainment bias because with a single exception we found no significant differences between cases and controls for all viral exposures and vaccinations. However, 699 cases and 165 controls reported a history of infectious mononucleosis (p
PubMed ID
19209005 View in PubMed
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[Basic indices of measles incidence in the years of mass inoculations with live measles vaccine]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41378
Source
Vrach Delo. 1979 May;(5):103-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979

Call to ARMS: recent measles outbreak reminds us of the importance of immunizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105909
Source
Alta RN. 2013;69(3):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Stewart
Source
Alta RN. 2013;69(3):28-30
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization - nursing - utilization
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Abstract
As health advisories go, the one this past summer released by the Public Health Agency of Canada went by largely unnoticed. Issued in July, the advisory alerted Canadians to the identification of nearly 30 cases of measles across six different provinces-including Alberta. Most of those cases were travel related, and involved travelers bringing measles back with them to Canada. A few small news articles followed, but by August most people had forgotten all about it. Except for experts and epidemiologists, who recognize that outbreaks like these should remind everyone that measles is not only poised for a resurgence, but already gaining headway in some parts of the world. And that's exactly why RNs and NPs should be encouraging more people to take vaccinations seriously.
PubMed ID
24288875 View in PubMed
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Can Norway be kept free from rubella and measles?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287481
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 Aug 22;137(14-15)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2017

144 records – page 1 of 15.