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23 records – page 1 of 3.

[Basic patterns in the epidemic process of measles under conditions of massive immunization].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249807
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Jul;(7):62-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
N A Kozlova
A A Sobolevskaia
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1977 Jul;(7):62-7
Date
Jul-1977
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Russia
Time Factors
Vaccination
Abstract
Observations over the measles epidemic process in Leningrad showed that the sporadic morbidity level reached in 1974--4.1 per 100 000 residents; however periodic elevation and decline of morbidity and tis seasonal variations persisted. A rise of morbidity in 1972--1973, and by preliminary data--in 1975, occurred on account of the older age groups. There was revealed no dependence of the disease incidence among the persons vaccinated on the time lapse after their vaccination. Individual batches of live measles vaccine issued in 1963--1969 were not up to the standard, this serving as one of the cases of the occurence of group incidence of the infection in some foci.
PubMed ID
143173 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of measles epidemics in the Donetsk region population under conditions of regular immunization]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31505
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(2):123-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
L I Slusar'
G N Kolomiitseva
E V Erokhina
T A Belomeria
I I Soshenko
A G Kovaleva
Source
Lik Sprava. 2002;(2):123-5
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
English Abstract
Humans
Immunization
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
With vaccination having become usual practice in health care, the incidence rate of measles in the Donetsk region has fallen 53.6-fold versus the prevaccination period. Bet there are also negative processes in the epidemiology of measles; of these, ever more frequent occurrence of the infection under consideration in persons of mature years is worthy of particular mention. The specific weight of juveniles and grown ups had come to be 68.65% in 1998 vs 6.3% in 1975. Since 1993 the case rate of measles is noted to be at its greatest among children less than two years of age and among adolescents, which fact can be referred to effects on the level of immunity of different factors including that of time of more than five years having elapsed since the previous immunization. The administration in 1997-1998 of vaccines to non-vaccinated persons and to unprotected ones permitted the incidence rate of measles to be kept down in juveniles and adults but the age brackets of sick persons were in fact the same as before the additional vaccinations done. The state of things discribed above attests to the need for development of cardinal measures to raise the level of individual and collective immunity in juveniles and adults.
PubMed ID
12073243 View in PubMed
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Comparative measles incidence among exposed military and nonmilitary persons in Anchorage, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6669
Source
Mil Med. 2004 Jul;169(7):515-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Danny J Glover
Jeffrey DeMain
John R Herbold
Paula J Schneider
Michel Bunning
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Mail Code 7676, 7703 Floyd Curl, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900, USA.
Source
Mil Med. 2004 Jul;169(7):515-7
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Susceptibility
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of measles that occurred in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1998 resulted in 33 diagnosed cases: 26 were laboratory confirmed and 7 were clinically confirmed. Twenty-nine (88%) of 33 cases occurred in individuals who had not been immunized with at least two measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccinations; 25 (76%) of 33 occurred in school-age children, 0 to 19 years of age. This study identifies the difference in the incidence of measles between the civilian school-age population, who was not completely immunized (two MMR vaccinations given at least 30 days apart), and the military dependent population who had been completely immunized. All cases occurred among civilians, and most (25 of 33 confirmed cases) were associated with school attendance. The authors conclude that a two-dose regimen of MMR vaccine is required to adequately protect individuals against measles.
PubMed ID
15291181 View in PubMed
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[Effectiveness of measles immunoprophylaxis and the criteria for assessing its possible elimination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39089
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1986 Nov;(11):24-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
A A Sokhin
L I Sliusar'
S A Ignatov
L S Mekhova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1986 Nov;(11):24-30
Date
Nov-1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Disease Reservoirs
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Immunity
Immunization, Secondary
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Measles virus - immunology
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Ukraine
Abstract
The study of measles morbidity in Donetsk Province in 1960-1984 and the study of antimeasles immunity in different groups of the population have shown that the problem of the liquidation of measles cannot be solved by immunizing the population in a single administration of the vaccine. To enhance the effectiveness of the immunoprophylaxis of measles and its influence on the epidemic process, a number of problems must be solved with the aim to improve the quality of the vaccine, especially its thermal stability, to establish the possibility of shifting the beginning of immunization from 15-17 months to 12 months of age, to increase the coverage of children with immunization against measles by decreasing the number of groundless exemptions from immunization and by immunizing children in risk groups according to individual schedules and dosage, to carry out selectively the booster immunization of persons who have lost their postvaccinal immunity, as revealed by laboratory test, or in whom such loss may be supposed, to introduce the objective method (indirect hemagglutination test) for controlling the state of immunity among different groups of the population into laboratory practice at sanitary and epidemiological stations. As to the possibility of the liquidation of measles, the statement of this problem is correct, but for its solution a complex of additional prophylactic and epidemic-control measures should be taken.
PubMed ID
3799112 View in PubMed
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From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Transmission of measles among a highly vaccinated school population--Anchorage, Alaska, 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33504
Source
JAMA. 1999 Jan 27;281(4):315-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-1999

Immunity against measles in school-aged children: implications for measles revaccination strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210658
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87(6):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Ratnam
R. West
V. Gadag
B. Williams
E. Oates
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, and Division of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87(6):407-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Schools
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
Measles serum antibody levels were determined by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) test in 1,075 children in the age bracket of 5 to 17 years who received a single dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR II) vaccine at one year of age. Of these, 297 children (28%) had measles PRN titres
PubMed ID
9009400 View in PubMed
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Is global measles eradication feasible?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167377
Source
Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2006;304:153-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
C A de Quadros
Author Affiliation
Sabin Vaccine Institute and Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC, USA. ciro.dequadros@sabin.org
Source
Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2006;304:153-63
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Humans
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - transmission
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Pan American Health Organization
Abstract
Measles is one of most infectious diseases. Before the introduction of the measles vaccine, practically all children in the long run contracted measles. By the end of the 1980s most countries of the world had incorporated measles vaccine into their routine vaccination programs. Globally, some 800,000 deaths due to measles still occur every year, half of them in Africa. Eradication of measles would play an important role in improving child survival. The goal to eradicate measles from the Americas was set by the Pan American Sanitary Conference in 1994. Progress to date has been remarkable. Measles is no longer an endemic disease in the Americas and interruption of transmission has been documented in most countries. As of August 2005, 3 years have elapsed since the detection of the last indigenous case in Venezuela in September 2002. This experience shows that interruption of measles transmission can be achieved and sustained over a long period of time and that global eradication is feasible if appropriate strategy is implemented. Even in a new paradigm in which eradication is not followed by the discontinuation of vaccination, eradication of measles will be a good investment to avoid expensive epidemics and save the almost one million children that die every year to infection with the measles virus. It is not a dream to think that we will se a world free of measles by the year 2015.
PubMed ID
16989269 View in PubMed
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Large outbreak of measles in a community with high vaccination coverage: implications for the vaccination schedule.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154951
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Nov 1;47(9):1143-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2008
Author
Angela Domínguez
Nuria Torner
Irene Barrabeig
Ariadna Rovira
Cristina Rius
Joan Cayla
Elsa Plasencia
Sofia Minguell
M Rosa Sala
Ana Martínez
Josep Costa
Mar Mosquera
Carmen Cabezas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Barcelona, Casanova 143, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. angela.dominguez@ub.edu
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Nov 1;47(9):1143-9
Date
Nov-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Male
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Spain - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vaccination
Abstract
Attempts to eliminate measles from a country or region may be disrupted by an imported case that affects indigenous persons. The objective of this study was to analyze epidemiological and clinical characteristics of a measles outbreak in Catalonia, Spain, in 2006.
Data on cases of measles reported to the Department of Health, Generalitat of Catalonia, during the period 28 August 2006 through 8 July 2007 were collected. Suspected cases were confirmed by determination of measles-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies and/or detection of virus genome. Incidences were calculated using the estimated population of Catalonia for 2006, and 95% confidence intervals were determined assuming a Poisson distribution. The association between proportions was determined using the chi(2) test and Fisher's exact test. The level of statistical significance was set at alpha = .05.
A total of 381 cases were confirmed, for an incidence of 6.6 cases per 100,000 persons. A total of 89.5% of cases occurred in nonvaccinated persons, mainly those aged
Notes
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Mar 1;48(5):685-6; author reply 68619191659
PubMed ID
18823269 View in PubMed
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Measles cases in highly vaccinated population of Novosibirsk, Russia, 2000-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158258
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Apr 16;26(17):2111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-2008
Author
A V Atrasheuskaya
M V Kulak
A A Neverov
S. Rubin
G M Ignatyev
Author Affiliation
State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology Vector, Koltsovo, Russia. marburgman3@infonet.by
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Apr 16;26(17):2111-8
Date
Apr-16-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Genotype
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Measles - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Measles Vaccine - immunology - therapeutic use
Measles virus - genetics - immunology
Prospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Treatment Failure
Vaccination
Abstract
While the proportion of measles cases in vaccinees is expected to increase as vaccine coverage increases, such cases must be carefully investigated. The present study was conducted to examine possible contributions to vaccine failures (VFs) and to genetically characterize measles virus (MV) strains circulating in Novosibirsk, Russia during 2000-2005. Totally, 27 adult measles patients admitted to a regional hospital were prospectively enrolled in our study. Genetic characterization of the MV strains revealed circulation of genotypes A, D4 and D6 between 2000 and 2003 years; a genotype D6 MV was associated with the 2005 measles outbreak. Based on IgG avidity testing, half of the vaccinated patients demonstrated evidence of secondary vaccine failure (SVF). Patients, representing both levels of vaccine failure in our study were characterized by the lack of protective titers of neutralizing antibodies against circulating MVs, despite high IgG levels in many cases and high IgG avidity in SVF cases.
PubMed ID
18343536 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.