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281 records – page 1 of 29.

The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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Absence of transmission of the d9 measles virus--Region of the Americas, November 2002-March 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186090
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2003
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003 Mar 21;52(11):228-9
Date
Mar-21-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Measles virus - genetics
Abstract
In 1994, countries of the Region of the Americas set a goal of interrupting indigenous measles transmission, and the regional plan of action for achieving this goal was begun in 1996. As of March 16, 2003, the Region of the Americas has been free for 17 weeks from known circulation of the d9 measles virus, the strain responsible for the only large outbreak of measles in the region during 2002 (Figure).
PubMed ID
12665116 View in PubMed
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[Achievements in the control of measles in the UkrSSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43476
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1973 Jan;50(1):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1973
Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Sep;10(3):127
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1968
Author
P S Clark
Source
Alaska Med. 1968 Sep;10(3):127
Date
Sep-1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Communicable disease control
Humans
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
5682220 View in PubMed
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Allergic disease and atopic sensitization in children in relation to measles vaccination and measles infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89798
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Rosenlund Helen
Bergström Anna
Alm Johan S
Swartz Jackie
Scheynius Annika
van Hage Marianne
Johansen Kari
Brunekreef Bert
von Mutius Erika
Ege Markus J
Riedler Josef
Braun-Fahrländer Charlotte
Waser Marco
Pershagen Göran
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. helen.rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2009 Mar;123(3):771-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthroposophy
Child
Child, Preschool
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Life Style
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the role of measles vaccination and measles infection in the development of allergic disease and atopic sensitization. METHODS: A total of 14 893 children were included from the cross-sectional, multicenter Prevention of Allergy-Risk Factors for Sensitization in Children Related to Farming and Anthroposophic Lifestyle study, conducted in 5 European countries (Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland). The children were between 5 and 13 years of age and represented farm children, Steiner-school children, and 2 reference groups. Children attending Steiner schools often have an anthroposophic (holistic) lifestyle in which some immunizations are avoided or postponed. Parental questionnaires provided information on exposure and lifestyle factors as well as symptoms and diagnoses in the children. A sample of the children was invited for additional tests, and 4049 children provided a blood sample for immunoglobulin E analyses. Only children with complete information on measles vaccination and infection were included in the analyses (84%). RESULTS: In the whole group of children, atopic sensitization was inversely associated with measles infection, and a similar tendency was seen for measles vaccination. To reduce risks of disease-related modification of exposure, children who reported symptoms of wheezing and/or eczema debuting during first year of life were excluded from some analyses. After this exclusion, inverse associations were observed between measles infection and "any allergic symptom" and "any diagnosis of allergy by a physician." However, no associations were found between measles vaccination and allergic disease. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that measles infection may protect against allergic disease in children.
PubMed ID
19255001 View in PubMed
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An agent-based approach for modeling dynamics of contagious disease spread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149292
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2009;8:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Liliana Perez
Suzana Dragicevic
Author Affiliation
Spatial Analysis and Modeling Laboratory, Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada. lperezca@sfu.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2009;8:50
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Computer simulation
Disease Transmission, Infectious - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Geographic Information Systems
Humans
Measles - epidemiology - transmission
Models, Theoretical
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The propagation of communicable diseases through a population is an inherent spatial and temporal process of great importance for modern society. For this reason a spatially explicit epidemiologic model of infectious disease is proposed for a greater understanding of the disease's spatial diffusion through a network of human contacts.
The objective of this study is to develop an agent-based modelling approach the integrates geographic information systems (GIS) to simulate the spread of a communicable disease in an urban environment, as a result of individuals' interactions in a geospatial context.
The methodology for simulating spatiotemporal dynamics of communicable disease propagation is presented and the model is implemented using measles outbreak in an urban environment as a case study. Individuals in a closed population are explicitly represented by agents associated to places where they interact with other agents. They are endowed with mobility, through a transportation network allowing them to move between places within the urban environment, in order to represent the spatial heterogeneity and the complexity involved in infectious diseases diffusion. The model is implemented on georeferenced land use dataset from Metro Vancouver and makes use of census data sets from Statistics Canada for the municipality of Burnaby, BC, Canada study site.
The results provide insights into the application of the model to calculate ratios of susceptible/infected in specific time frames and urban environments, due to its ability to depict the disease progression based on individuals' interactions. It is demonstrated that the dynamic spatial interactions within the population lead to high numbers of exposed individuals who perform stationary activities in areas after they have finished commuting. As a result, the sick individuals are concentrated in geographical locations like schools and universities.
The GIS-agent based model designed for this study can be easily customized to study the disease spread dynamics of any other communicable disease by simply adjusting the modeled disease timeline and/or the infection model and modifying the transmission process. This type of simulations can help to improve comprehension of disease spread dynamics and to take better steps towards the prevention and control of an epidemic outbreak.
Notes
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:3518606008
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Cites: Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Apr 1;23(7):49-519104045
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 1999 Apr 22;266(1421):859-6710343409
PubMed ID
19656403 View in PubMed
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Analysis of a measles epidemic; possible role of vaccine failures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251733
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-22-1975
Author
W E Rawls
M L Rawls
M A Chernesky
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Nov 22;113(10):941-4
Date
Nov-22-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Male
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles Vaccine
Ontario
Time Factors
Vaccines, Attenuated
Abstract
A measles epidemic occurred in the Greensville (Ont.) Unit schools during January and February 1975. There were 47 cases of measles in 403 students: 26 (55%) of the children had a history of being vaccinated and 18 (38%) had not been vaccinated. Among children known to have been vaccinated at less than 1 year of age 7 of 13 contracted measles, while among the 48 children who had not been vaccinated 18 contracted measles. The attack rate among vaccinees increased with increasing time since vaccination. The observations of this study as well as those of similar studies suggest that vaccine failures contributed to the genesis of the epidemic. It is recommended that all children initially vaccinated at less than 1 year of age should be revaccinated with live attenuated measles virus vaccine.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1965 Mar;66:471-8814264306
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1962 Mar;103:340-414454408
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1972 Oct;81(4):737-414116365
Cites: Pediatrics. 1970 Sep;46(3):397-4024195394
Cites: JAMA. 1974 Feb 18;227(7):780-34405844
Cites: Bull N Y Acad Med. 1974 May;50(5):602-194595488
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1972 Dec;124(6):848-504639220
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Cites: J Pediatr. 1973 May;82(5):802-84698954
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Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1973 Jun;97(6):365-714713932
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 1961 Jul 27;265:165-913740532
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1964 Nov;108:470-814208407
PubMed ID
1192310 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the incubation period for measles in the epidemic in Greenland in 1951 using a variance components model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224202
Source
Stat Med. 1992 Mar;11(5):579-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
D. Kronborg
B. Hansen
P. Aaby
Author Affiliation
Statistical Research Unit, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Stat Med. 1992 Mar;11(5):579-90
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Measles - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Registries
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper presents a model for analysing the incubation period of highly infectious diseases in populations where almost all susceptibles become infected during an epidemic. The model leads to a simple method for estimating the variance of the duration of the incubation period without any distributional assumptions. Further, the influence of covariates on the duration of the incubation period can be analysed. Data from the epidemic of measles in Greenland in 1951 are analysed and it is found that intersymptom times are correlated within households, suggesting that secondary cases are infected almost simultaneously. This result is inconsistent with a variation in the times of infection of secondary cases within a household which is often assumed when analysing data on measles. Prophylactic treatment did not prevent infection in the epidemic in Greenland, but it is found that the incubation period tended to be shorter for persons not receiving prophylactic treatment.
PubMed ID
1594801 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of measles in southern Greenland, 1951; measles in virgin soil. III. Measles and tuberculosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70323
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1953;144(6):450-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1953
Author
Christensen, P E
Schmidt, H.
Bang, H O
Andersen, V.
Jordal, B.
Jensen, O.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1953;144(6):450-4
Date
1953
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Measles - epidemiology
Notes
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 796.
PubMed ID
13050348 View in PubMed
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[An epidemiological assessment of the protection against measles by population age groups in the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220816
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):56-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu P Rykushin
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):56-62
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aging - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Infant
Measles - epidemiology - immunology
Measles Vaccine - immunology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The population of the Russian Federation has been divided into 5 groups according to their immunity to measles; the epidemiological importance of this division for the prognosis of measles morbidity for the next decade has been substantiated. As revealed in this study, children under 6 years and born in 1966-1978 who have received only one immunization are least protected from measles and make up the main socio-epidemiological nucleus of the population which will determine the level of measles morbidity in the next decade. The conclusion has been made on the necessity of mass immunization (revaccination) of high school and college students and groups of servicemen not later than 1995 in order to eliminate measles by the year of 2000.
PubMed ID
8067116 View in PubMed
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281 records – page 1 of 29.