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[90th anniversary of national hygienic regulation of chemicals in workplace air].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112908
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
K K Sidorov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):1-6
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - history
Anniversaries and Special Events
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Health - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Abstract
The authors followed occurrence and formation of the national hygienic regulation of chemicals in workplace air, since 1920s in historical aspect. Now there is 90th anniversary of the regulation.
PubMed ID
23785800 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the existing standards for exposure to ultraviolet radiation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208776
Source
Usp Fiziol Nauk. 1997 Apr-Jun;28(2):94-106
Publication Type
Article
Author
A D Strzhizhovskii
Source
Usp Fiziol Nauk. 1997 Apr-Jun;28(2):94-106
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States
Abstract
Quantitative analysis of threshold limit levels of UV-irradiation in the workroom environment established in USA, Netherlands and Russia was made. Comparison of its results with modern information about effective doses and action spectra of UV-radiation biological action allowed to reveal essential differences in the approach to rate setting and in some cases presence of internal contradictions and exceeding of threshold limit levels of UV irradiation above biologically effective values. The possibility of workroom UV standards utilisation for regulation of nature UV-radiation exposures was considered.
PubMed ID
9235809 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of current occupational standards for protecting the health of nuclear workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24709
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Publication Type
Article
Author
B E Lambert
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Biology, Medical College of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, England.
Source
Occup Med. 1991 Oct-Dec;6(4):725-39
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forecasting
Humans
Incidence
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Protection - standards
Abstract
It will be clear from the aforegoing that occupational standards have varied over the past 30-40 years since the beginnings of the nuclear industry. Our perception of risk rates for cancer mortality and genetic effects has changed, such that the rates have been constantly revised upwards. Logically, dose limits should have been reduced in proportion, but this assumes a constant approach to the "tolerability" or "acceptability" of risk and this has not been demonstrated. Dose limits are not seen by management in the nuclear industry as the only plank in the structure of radiation protection; emphasis is also being given to the "optimization" ethic. In these circumstances a good test of the efficacy of the system of radiation control in limiting health effects is needed. As can be seen, no such study is available and, given the doses received and the numbers of workers involved, it is unlikely that any epidemiologic study, apart from studies on miners, will have sufficient statistical power to be totally unequivocal. However, some studies have shown cancer mortality associations with radiation exposure that are significant. Probably the best way to mitigate the inherent drawbacks in these studies is to pool data-sets, and this is being done. Other improvements will include estimates of cancer incidence in countries with cancer registries (e.g., U.K., Canada, and Sweden) and to perhaps go beyond epidemiologic data to consider sensitive biologic markers as indices of exposure. Overall the conclusion must be that the radiation industry cannot be complacent and for some tasks in the processes involved (e.g., uranium mining) there is strong evidence of a history of unacceptable health effects occurring.
PubMed ID
1962255 View in PubMed
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Air and biological monitoring of solvent exposure during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72055
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Nov;73(8):561-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
H. Anundi
S. Langworth
G. Johanson
M L Lind
B. Akesson
L. Friis
N. Itkes
E. Söderman
B A Jönsson
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. helena.anundi@medsci.uu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Nov;73(8):561-9
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Comparative Study
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Pyrrolidinones - analysis - blood - urine
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - toxicity
Sweden
Teratogens
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The principal aim of the study was to estimate the level of exposure to organic solvents of graffiti removers, and to identify the chemicals used in different cleaning agents. A secondary objective was to inform about the toxicity of various products and to optimise working procedures. METHODS: Exposure to organic solvents was determined by active air sampling and biological monitoring among 38 graffiti removers during an 8-h work shift in the Stockholm underground system. The air samples and biological samples were analysed by gas chromatography. Exposure to organic solvents was also assessed by a questionnaire and interviews. RESULTS: Solvents identified were N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether (DPGME), propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME), diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DEGEE), toluene, xylene, pseudocumene, hemimellitine, mesitylene, ethylbenzene, limonene, nonane, decane, undecane, hexandecane and gamma-butyrolactone. The 8-h average exposures [time-weighted average (TWA)] were below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents identified. In poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators etc., the short-term exposures exceeded occasionally the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL). The blood and urine concentrations of NMP and its metabolites were low. Glycol ethers and their metabolites (2-methoxypropionic acid (MPA), ethoxy acetic acid (EAA), butoxy acetic acid (BAA), and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) acetic acid (MEAA)) were found in low concentrations in urine. There were significant correlation between the concentrations of NMP in air and levels of NMP and its metabolites in blood and urine. The use of personal protective equipment, i.e. gloves and respirators, was generally high. CONCLUSIONS: Many different cleaning agents were used. The average exposure to solvents was low, but some working tasks included relatively high short-term exposure. To prevent adverse health effects, it is important to inform workers about the health risks and to restrict the use of the most toxic chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working procedures and to encourage the use of personal protection equipment.
PubMed ID
11100951 View in PubMed
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[Air dust level in the cabins of excavators at the Borodinskii coal-stripping section of the Kansk-Achinsk Fuel and Energy complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237454
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1986 Feb;(2):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986

Air quality during the winter in Qu├ębec day-care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224262
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Daneault
M. Beausoleil
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and Environment, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Heating - methods - standards
Humans
Humidity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Quebec
Temperature
Time Factors
Ventilation - methods - standards
Abstract
Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Dec 2;299(6712):1388-902513974
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):57-623546636
Cites: Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1985;36:1-393866314
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Oct;50(1):37-552792060
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1986 Jul-Aug;8(4):514-203529306
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 May;79(5):685-7003571762
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Aug 10;291(6492):373-63926199
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1175-73407814
PubMed ID
1536362 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995
Author
P. Levallois
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Feb 15;152(4):467-8
Date
Feb-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - adverse effects
Alzheimer Disease - chemically induced
Canada
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Water Supply - standards
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 1;145(7):793-8041822096
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Jan 1;150(1):68-97903905
Comment On: CMAJ. 1994 Aug 1;151(3):268-718039073
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1995 Jun 1;152(11):1751
PubMed ID
7859190 View in PubMed
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378 records – page 1 of 38.