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172 records – page 1 of 18.

Accuracy of clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone anatomy for implantation--a survey of 374 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181217
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Gintaras Juodzbalys
Aune M Raustia
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kaunas University of Medicine, Vainiku 12, LT-3018 Kaunas, Lithuania.
Source
J Oral Implantol. 2004;30(1):30-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Process - pathology - radiography
Atrophy
Cephalometry - instrumentation
Dental Arch - pathology - radiography
Dental Implantation, Endosseous
Dental Implants
Female
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous - classification - pathology - radiography
Male
Mandible - pathology - radiography
Maxilla - pathology - radiography
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Radiography, Panoramic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical features of edentulous jaw dental segments (eJDS) in order to offer the most reliable clinical and radiological classification of such segments in planning for implant treatment. A total of 374 patients, 156 men and 218 women, participated in the investigation. The mean age of the patients was 46 years (SD 12.7), ranging between 17 and 73 years. The eJDS were estimated by means of orthopantomogram, computerized tomography, and intraorally with special ridge-mapping callipers for measurement of alveolar process width. A total of 792 screw-shaped and 1-stage Osteofix Dental Implant System (Oulu, Finland) implants were inserted. Dental segments were divided according to the results of the commonly accepted eJDS assessments into 3 clinical-anatomical types. Type I indicated insignificant or no atrophy of eJDS (232 patients with 476 implant sites; 60.1% of the total number). Type II indicated mild to moderate vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (100 patients with 222 sites; 28% of the total number). Type III indicated significant vertical or horizontal atrophy of eJDS (42 patients with 94 sites; 11.9% of the total number). The accuracy of the clinical and radiological classification was adjudged to have been 95.8%. By the process of establishing clinical and radiological classification of the jawbone segments, more reliability was anticipated regarding the insertion of implants both in maxillae and mandibles.
PubMed ID
15008452 View in PubMed
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Age and skeletal type-related changes of some cephalometric parameters in Finnish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230364
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 Aug;11(3):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
K. Haavikko
A. Rahkamo
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1989 Aug;11(3):283-9
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging
Cephalometry
Child
Facial Bones - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland
Humans
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Reference Standards
Skull - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to define some cephalometric standards in a group of 217 Finnish girls from 7.0 to 18.0 years of age and furthermore to estimate the influence of the skeletal classes on these standards. Age-related changes were seen between the standards of the youngest (7.0-9.5 years) and the oldest (14.5-18.0 years) group where 9 out of 15 of the inspected angles increased with age, three of them ANPr***, SNPg** and SNB* significantly, and 6 decreased, four of them significantly: ANPg***, ANB**, NL/ML* and RL/ML*. The cranial base angles did not show any significant age-related or skeletal type-related variations. Between the skeletal groups I and II significant differences were seen in 11 variables. Between skeletal I and III groups, 7 angles were significantly different. The results demonstrate that when cephalometric standards are used, they should be derived from that population, they should be age related, and the skeletal pattern should be taken into account.
PubMed ID
2792217 View in PubMed
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Age differences in adult dentoalveolar heights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226556
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1991 Apr;13(2):149-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
A. Tallgren
B. Solow
Author Affiliation
Institute of Orthodontics, Royal Dental College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1991 Apr;13(2):149-56
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Alveolar Process - anatomy & histology
Cephalometry
Female
Finland
Humans
Incisor - anatomy & histology
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Middle Aged
Vertical Dimension
Abstract
A previous study of age differences in facial morphology in a dentate sample representing young, middle, and old age (Tallgren and Solow, 1987) indicated an increase in lower anterior face height during adulthood. The aim of the present study was to examine in detail the accompanying age differences in dentoalveolar heights. The material consisted of lateral head films of 191 dentate Finnish women divided into the age groups 20-29, 30-49, and 50-81 years. The present study comprised 26 variables calculated from digitized reference points. The maxillary and mandibular anterior dentoalveolar heights were significantly larger in the middle and old age groups than in the young group, and the mean differences were of the same magnitude for the maxilla and the mandible. Analysis of the dentoalveolar components showed that in the mandible the extra-alveolar height of the incisors was significantly larger in the two older age groups than in the young group, while no significant differences were found in the maxilla. The mean differences in anterior mandibular ridge height between the older age groups and the young group were smaller than in the maxilla. No significant differences in dentoalveolar morphology were observed between the middle and the old age groups.
PubMed ID
2055254 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Jokstad
I A Mjör
V. Qvist
Author Affiliation
Dental Faculty, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Aug;52(4):234-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Composite Resins - chemistry
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Amalgam - chemistry
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Glass Ionomer Cements - chemistry
Gold Alloys - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Middle Aged
Scandinavia
Time Factors
Abstract
In a cross-sectional survey the age of restorations in situ was recorded in three patient groups. Group A were randomly examined regular attenders, group B were irregular attenders randomly chosen from patient treatment records, and in group C the age of posterior gold and composite resin restorations was recorded in selected regular attenders. The study material included 8310 restorations in group A, 1281 in group B, and 500 restorations in group C. The three materials amalgam, composite, and gold accounted for more than 90% of all restorations. In group A 3.3% of the restorations were scheduled for replacement. The most prevalent reasons for replacement were secondary caries, bulk fractures of the restoration, and tooth fractures. The median age of the failed restorations was fairly similar to the median age of the acceptable restorations in situ among the regular patients (group A). The data indicate median ages of 20 years for gold restorations, 12-14 years for amalgam restorations, and 7-8 years for composite resin restorations. The restoration ages were influenced by the type and size of the restoration, the restorative material used, and possibly also the intra-oral location of the restorations.
PubMed ID
7985509 View in PubMed
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Alveolar arch dimensions and occlusal traits. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238626
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):234-41, 249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
T. Laine
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):234-41, 249-50
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cephalometry
Dental Arch - anatomy & histology
Dental Occlusion
Finland
Humans
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Sex Factors
Abstract
A statistical evaluation of dentoalveolar relationships in a cross-section of young Finnish adults, finding little relationship between occlusal anomalies and dimensions of the alveolar arches.
PubMed ID
3863504 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alveolar arch dimensions, orthodontic treatment and absence of permanent teeth among Finnish students. An epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238627
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):225-33, 249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
T. Laine
H. Hausen
Source
Angle Orthod. 1985 Jul;55(3):225-33, 249-50
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cephalometry
Dental Arch - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mandible - anatomy & histology
Maxilla - anatomy & histology
Orthodontics, Corrective
Palate - anatomy & histology
Sex Factors
Tooth Extraction
Abstract
Statistical comparison of arch width, length and palatal height with age, sex, orthodontic treatment and extractions finds little correlation except a tendency for larger dimensions in males, especially in palatal width, and differences related to postextraction drift.
PubMed ID
3863503 View in PubMed
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An analysis of 12 years of craniomaxillofacial surgery in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238610
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985 Jul;76(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1985
Author
I R Munro
R E Sabatier
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1985 Jul;76(1):29-35
Date
Jul-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Face - surgery
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maxilla - surgery
Middle Aged
Ontario
Postoperative Complications
Skull - surgery
Surgical Wound Infection
Abstract
Over 12 years, 1092 patients underwent 2019 craniomaxillofacial procedures in Toronto. Overall mortality was 0.64 percent, and that directly related to surgery was 0.18 percent. Major complications developed in 14.3 percent of patients, but not all had permanent sequelae. Infection was the greatest problem, occurring in 5.3 percent of the major operations. The annual incidence of complications dropped to 5.4 percent as our experience increased. Certain types of deformity, particularly those in patients with orbital hypertelorism, Treacher-Collins syndrome, or Crouzon's or Apert's syndrome, require more than one operation to achieve maximum correction. Our procedures have undergone many changes, the main one being a reduced operating time.
PubMed ID
4011777 View in PubMed
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An anatomic study of the pterygomaxillary region in the craniums of infants and children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45018
Source
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol. 1966 Feb;21(2):225-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1966

Assessment of removed dental implants in Finland from 1994 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105968
Source
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2013 Nov-Dec;28(6):1612-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anna-Kaisa Antalainen
Mika Helminen
Helena Forss
George K Sándor
Jan Wolff
Source
Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2013 Nov-Dec;28(6):1612-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Implantation - statistics & numerical data
Dental Implants - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Device Removal - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mandible
Maxilla
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland (THL) has maintained the Finnish Dental Implant Register since April 1994. The aim of this study was to use the Dental Implant Register to assess the influence of patient characteristics and background factors on dental implant removals in Finland from 1994 to 2012.
THL granted permission to access the Finnish Dental lmplant Register (1994 to 2012) and assess the following factors: total implant placements, total implant removals, time from implant placement to removal, implant types, implant lengths, placed and failed implants by jaw and tooth type, and patient sex and age.
A total of 198,538 dental implants (51 different types) were placed between 1994 and 2012. A total of 3,318 (1.7%) of the placed implants were removed during the observation period. A total of 1,856 (1.8%) of the placed implants were removed from the maxilla and 1,462 (1.5%) from the mandible (P
PubMed ID
24278930 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.