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307 records – page 1 of 31.

[8 out of 10 midwives informed about folic acid. Most of them considered their knowledge about folic acid not sufficient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30331
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-2004
Author
Anette Lundqvist
Anna Lena Wennberg
Gunvor Lövgren
Herbert Sandström
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå universitet. anette.lundqvist@nurs.umu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 7;101(15-16):1380-2, 1385-6
Date
Apr-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Continuing
English Abstract
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - prevention & control
Guidelines
Health education
Humans
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare
Neural Tube Defects - etiology - prevention & control
Nurse Midwives - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Deficiency of folic acid increases the risk for neural tube defects among newborn children and megaloblastic anaemia in the mother. The aim of this study was to make a survey of how midwives working in maternity health care, family planning guidance, and specialist prenatal care in a Swedish county inform women of childbearing age about folic acid. The questionnaire study showed that 79% of the midwives informed the women about folic acid. Usually, the women received information first when they asked for it and midwifes were less prone to inform young women about folic acid. 87% of the midwives felt that they did not know enough about folic acid. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives play an important role in information about the need of folic acid intake for women in childbearing age. Changes in local routines, guidelines and further education of midwifes would subsequently provide information about the importance of folic acid to women in childbearing age.
PubMed ID
15146665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic commitment to maternal, newborn, infant, and child health in circumpolar regions: a Canadian imperative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131035
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):342-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011

Accountability in Canada's Muskoka Initiative questioned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104322
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2014
Author
Paul C Webster
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Date
May-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - economics
Child Welfare - economics
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - economics
Maternal Welfare - economics
Pregnancy
Social Responsibility
Notes
Erratum In: Lancet. 2014 May 31;383(9932):e18
PubMed ID
24822257 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activities of the Leningrad women's departments on maternal and child welfare (1926--1929)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246496
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1980;(4):64-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980

Addicted mothers and their children: a case for coordinated welfare services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39559
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1985 May-Jun;11(3):159-69
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Merrick
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1985 May-Jun;11(3):159-69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Welfare
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome - etiology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Abstract
Children of drug-addicted mothers are at an increased risk of premature birth, neonatal complications, developmental delay, understimulation, deprivation, neglect, abuse and even premature death. Research results from four Danish centres are presented and discussed. The material covers the period from 1970-1983. The studies clearly show a need for more coordinated support and services for these families and their children in order to prevent a new generation of 'social losers'.
PubMed ID
4028341 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Admission to the obstetric department versus ambulatory labor--seen from women's perspective]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64117
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 22;161(8):1134-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1999
Author
J L Knudsen
M. Christensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Feb 22;161(8):1134-5
Date
Feb-22-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics
Comparative Study
Cost Savings
Denmark
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Length of Stay
Maternal Welfare
Patient Admission
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Oct 5;160(41):5939-429786034
PubMed ID
10074860 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Aftercare of newborn infants in a patient hotel]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58759
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2000
Author
C. Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Barneintensiv avdeling, Kvinne-barn klinikken, Barnesentret Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 May 10;120(12):1409-11
Date
May-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Maternal Welfare
Maternal-Child Nursing
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Postnatal Care
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Safety
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Postnatal care of the healthy term newborn and the mother has, in modern times, taken place in the hospital setting. As a result of tightened hospital budgets as well as maternal preferences the duration of hospital stay has successively been shortened. Most women in Scandinavia today leave the hospital within four days after delivery. Postnatal care in a hotel like setting has emerged as an alternative to the well-baby nursery unless medical conditions makes this option inappropriate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: To evaluate the safety of postnatal care a study was undertaken to investigate whether correct criteria were being used for referral of the newborn to the hotel. We also wanted to document the duration of stay, unexpected medical complications, and weight development of the infants. Data from 865 infants were used for analysis. RESULTS: Ten (1.1%) newborns had to be readmitted to the hospital due to medical complications. 488 (56%) of the mothers went home within 96 hours, and only 23 (2.6%) stayed more than 120 hours. The weight of the infants reached a nadir on the fourth day post partum (-5.2% of birth weight). INTERPRETATION: The patient hotel is a medically safe alternative to the traditional well-baby nursery, provided that appropriate criteria for referral are used.
PubMed ID
10851936 View in PubMed
Less detail

307 records – page 1 of 31.