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The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study: rationale and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122539
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Bonnie J Kaplan
Gerald F Giesbrecht
Brenda M Y Leung
Catherine J Field
Deborah Dewey
Rhonda C Bell
Donna P Manca
Maeve O'Beirne
David W Johnston
Victor J Pop
Nalini Singhal
Lisa Gagnon
Francois P Bernier
Misha Eliasziw
Linda J McCargar
Libbe Kooistra
Anna Farmer
Marja Cantell
Laki Goonewardene
Linda M Casey
Nicole Letourneau
Jonathan W Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Primary Health Care, University of Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Medical Genetics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Teaching & Research Support, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Clinical & Developmental Neuropsychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands Department of Paediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Department of Lab Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2014 Jan;10(1):44-60
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Anthropometry
Child Development
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Multivariate Analysis
Neurons - metabolism
Nutritional Status
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their offspring and many of their partners). The primary aims of the APrON study were to determine the relationships between maternal nutrient intake and status, before, during and after gestation, and (1) maternal mood; (2) birth and obstetric outcomes; and (3) infant neurodevelopment. We have collected comprehensive maternal nutrition, anthropometric, biological and mental health data at multiple points in the pregnancy and the post-partum period, as well as obstetrical, birth, health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these pregnancies. The study continues to follow the infants through to 36 months of age. The current report describes the study design and methods, and findings of some pilot work. The APrON study is a significant resource with opportunities for collaboration.
PubMed ID
22805165 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding and maternal and infant iodine nutrition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90245
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 May;70(5):803-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Azizi Fereidoun
Smyth Peter
Author Affiliation
Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. azizi@erc.ac.ir
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 May;70(5):803-9
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Iodine - administration & dosage - deficiency - metabolism
Lactation - metabolism
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk, Human - metabolism
Nutritional Status
Postpartum Period - metabolism
Pregnancy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to explore information available regarding iodine secretion in milk, both mothers and infants iodine nutrition during breastfeeding and to make recommendations for appropriate iodine supplementation during lactation. DESIGN: MEDLINE was queried for studies between 1960 and 2007 that included lactation and breastfeeding with iodine and iodine deficiency. Studies were selected if they studied (i) Secretion of iodine in breast milk; (ii) breastfeeding and iodine nutrition; (iii) factors affecting maternal iodine metabolism and (iv) recommendations for iodine supplementation during breastfeeding. RESULTS: Thirty-six articles met the selection criteria. The iodine content of breast milk varies with dietary iodine intake, being lowest in areas of iodine deficiency with high prevalence of goitre. Milk iodine levels are correspondingly higher when programs of iodine prophylaxis such as salt iodization or administration of iodized oil have been introduced. The small iodine pool of the neonatal thyroid turns over very rapidly and is highly sensitive to variations in dietary iodine intake. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter is up-regulated in the lactating mammary gland which results in preferential uptake of iodide. In areas of iodine sufficiency breast milk iodine concentration should be in the range of 100-150 microg/dl. Studies from France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, Italy, Denmark, Thailand and Zaire have shown breast milk concentrations of
PubMed ID
19178515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104943
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lars Olov Bygren
Petter Tinghög
John Carstensen
Sören Edvinsson
Gunnar Kaati
Marcus E Pembrey
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. lars.olov.bygren@ki.se.
Source
BMC Genet. 2014;15:12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics - mortality
Diet
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inheritance Patterns
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutritional Status - genetics
Pedigree
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether large fluctuations in food availability during grandparents' early development influenced grandchildren's cardiovascular mortality. We reported earlier that changes in availability of food - from good to poor or from poor to good - during intrauterine development was followed by a double risk of sudden death as an adult, and that mortality rate can be associated with ancestors' childhood availability of food. We have now studied transgenerational responses (TGR) to sharp differences of harvest between two consecutive years' for ancestors of 317 people in Överkalix, Sweden.
The confidence intervals were very wide but we found a striking TGR. There was no response in cardiovascular mortality in the grandchild from sharp changes of early exposure, experienced by three of the four grandparents (maternal grandparents and paternal grandfathers). If, however, the paternal grandmother up to puberty lived through a sharp change in food supply from one year to next, her sons' daughters had an excess risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.05-6.92). Selection or learning and imitation are unlikely explanations. X-linked epigenetic inheritance via spermatozoa seemed to be plausible, with the transmission, limited to being through the father, possibly explained by the sex differences in meiosis.
The shock of change in food availability seems to give specific transgenerational responses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24552514 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Animals
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe changes in consumption of different types of beverages from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy, and to examine associations with maternal age, educational level and BMI.
Cross-sectional design. Participants answered an FFQ at inclusion into a randomized controlled trial, the Fit for Delivery (FFD) trial, in median gestational week 15 (range: 9-20), reporting current consumption and in retrospect how often they drank the different beverages pre-pregnancy.
Eight local antenatal clinics in southern Norway from September 2009 to February 2013.
Five hundred and seventy-five healthy pregnant nulliparous women.
Pre-pregnancy, 27 % reported drinking alcohol at least once weekly, compared with none in early pregnancy (P
PubMed ID
25221910 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
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The developmental origins of chronic rheumatic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108252
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):655-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan G Eriksson
Eero Kajantie
David I W Phillips
Clive Osmond
Kent L Thornburg
David J P Barker
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Finland; Vasa Central Hospital, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland; Unit of General Practice, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):655-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth weight
Body Size
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Middle Aged
Placenta - physiology
Pregnancy
Rheumatic Heart Disease - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Programming is the phenomenon whereby the body's structures and functions are permanently set by nutrition and other influences during early development. There is increasing evidence that programming in utero initiates cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that susceptibility to developing chronic rheumatic heart disease on exposure to Streptococcus pyogenes is programmed.
We studied hospital admissions and deaths from chronic rheumatic heart disease in 20,431 people born in Helsinki, Finland, during 1924-1944. One hundred and one people, 56 men, and 45 women, had chronic rheumatic heart disease.
The disease was not associated with body or placental size at birth. It was, however, associated with a long umbilical cord so that the hazard ratio for the disease was 1.23 (95% CI 1.04-1.45, P?=?0.02) for every 10 cm increase in cord length. This association was present in people with mitral valve disease, hazard ratio 1.5 (1.20-1.89, P?
PubMed ID
23913477 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a vitamin D status prediction model in Danish pregnant women: a study of the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117187
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53059
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Camilla Bjørn Jensen
Andrew L Thorne-Lyman
Linda Vadgård Hansen
Marin Strøm
Nina Odgaard Nielsen
Arieh Cohen
Sjurdur Frodi Olsen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53059
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Maternal Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D has been hypothesized to reduce risk of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, and preterm delivery. However, many of these outcomes are rare and require a large sample size to study, representing a challenge for cohorts with a limited number of preserved samples. The aims of this study were to (1) identify predictors of serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) among pregnant women in a subsample (N?=?1494) of the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) and (2) develop and validate a score predicting 25(OH)D-status in order to explore associations between vitamin D and maternal and offspring health outcomes in the DNBC. In our study sample, 42.3% of the population had deficient levels of vitamin D (
Notes
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PubMed ID
23326380 View in PubMed
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Development of a New Nordic Diet score and its association with gestational weight gain and fetal growth - a study performed in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263466
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):1909-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Elisabet R Hillesund
Elling Bere
Margaretha Haugen
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Sep;17(9):1909-18
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Fetal Development
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - prevention & control
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Models, Biological
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
To construct a diet score for assessing degree of adherence to a healthy and environmentally friendly New Nordic Diet (NND) and to investigate its association with adequacy of gestational weight gain and fetal growth in a large prospective birth cohort.
Main exposure was NND adherence, categorized as low, medium or high adherence. Main outcomes were adequacy of gestational weight gain, described as inadequate, optimal or excessive according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine guidelines, and fetal growth, categorized as being small, appropriate or large for gestational age. Associations of NND adherence with gestational weight gain and fetal growth were estimated with multinomial logistic regression in crude and adjusted models.
Norway.
Women (n 66 597) from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
Higher NND adherence implied higher energy and nutrient intakes, higher nutrient density and a healthier macronutrient distribution. Normal-weight women with high as compared with low NND adherence had lower adjusted odds of excessive gestational weight gain (OR=0·93; 95 % CI 0·87, 0·99; P=0·024). High as compared with low NND adherence was associated with reduced odds of the infant being born small for gestational age (OR=0·92; 95 % CI 0·86, 0·99; P=0·025) and with higher odds of the baby being born large for gestational age (OR=1·07; 95 % CI 1·00, 1·15; P=0·048).
The NND score captures diet quality. Adherence to a regional diet including a large representation of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, potatoes, fish, game, milk and drinking water during pregnancy may facilitate optimal gestational weight gain in normal-weight women and improve fetal growth in general.
PubMed ID
24685309 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet and blood lipids in 1-4 year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118658
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Oct;23(10):980-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
U. Hoppu
E. Isolauri
P. Koskinen
K. Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Functional Foods Forum, 20014 University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: ullhop@utu.fi.
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2013 Oct;23(10):980-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child Development
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Mothers - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Early nutrition may programme blood lipid levels and thereby later cardiovascular health of children. The objective here was to evaluate the effects of maternal dietary counselling during pregnancy and breastfeeding on dietary intakes and blood lipid values in 1-4 year-old children. Further, the nutritional determinants of children's lipid profiles were assessed.
Mothers were randomised into dietary counselling or control groups at the first trimester of pregnancy. Their children were followed up clinically at 1, 2 and 4 years of age, by three-day food records and analyses of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and apolipoproteins A-I and B as well as lipoprotein (a). In general, the mean intake of saturated fatty acids as a proportion of total energy intake (E%) was higher than the recommended, while the mean intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids was low in children's diet. Over the first years, girls had higher concentration of non-HDL cholesterol than boys; 2.64 mmol/l (95% CI 2.54-2.74) vs. 2.49 (2.38-2.60); p = 0.038. Maternal dietary counselling was not reflected in the children's lipid values. Children's monounsaturated fatty acid intake (E%) correlated with apoA-I (p = 0.048) and, furthermore, there was a negative correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (E%) and apoB (p = 0.046).
Children's dietary fatty acid intake, but not maternal dietary counselling was shown to be related to blood apolipoproteins in children.
PubMed ID
23182924 View in PubMed
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[Diet and nutrient intake of pregnant women in the capital area in Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284954
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):378-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Ellen Alma Tryggvadottir
Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir
Thorhallur Ingi Halldorsson
Helga Medek
Reynir Tomas Geirsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Sep;102(9):378-84
Date
Sep-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Choice Behavior
Diet - adverse effects
Feeding Behavior
Female
Health status
Healthy Diet
Humans
Iceland
Maternal health
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Recommended dietary allowances
Urban health
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutrition in pregnancy may affect growth, development and health of the child in the short and long term. We aimed to assess diet and nutrient intake among pregnant women in the capital area and evaluate differences in dietary intake between women who were overweight/obese and normal weight before pregnancy.
Pregnant women aged 18-40 years (n=183) living in the capital area kept four day weighed food records to assess diet and nutrient intake in the 19th-24th week of pregnancy (n=98 with body mass index (BMI)
PubMed ID
27646179 View in PubMed
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