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113 records – page 1 of 12.

[Are there any regional differences when it comes to obstetrical care quality?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58218
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 4;101(45):3615; discussion 3616
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004

Aspects on the European and especially Swedish MCH services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41158
Source
Paediatrician. 1980;9(1):42-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
P O Petersson
Source
Paediatrician. 1980;9(1):42-52
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - standards - trends
Child, Preschool
Dental Health Services - trends
Europe
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Male
Maternal Health Services - standards - trends
Pediatrics
Physical Examination
Scandinavia
Sweden
Abstract
Maternal and child health has a long tradition in Europe, going back to the turn of the century when it was already becoming clear in several parts of Europe that to decrease infant mortality rates and maternal death it was necessary to add to sanitation more direct services reaching the mother in her home and educating her in baby care and nutrition as well as hygiene. Health progress in this field was more than consolidated with the advent of modern medicine and antibiotics.
PubMed ID
7352102 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the current status of maternity care. Interview by Arja Laiho].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221382
Source
Katilolehti. 1993 Apr;98(2):7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993

[Best maternal care for the benefit of the pregnant woman!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64371
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 20;117(2):263
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1997
Author
H K Bakke
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 20;117(2):263
Date
Jan-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - standards
Maternal Welfare
Norway
Pregnancy
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 10;117(1):949064822
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 10;117(7):1002-39102993
PubMed ID
9064847 View in PubMed
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Birth centre care over a 10-year period: infant morbidity during the first month after birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58114
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Sep;94(9):1253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Karin Gottvall
Birger Winbladh
Sven Cnattingius
Ulla Waldenström
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.gottvall@kbh.ki.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Sep;94(9):1253-60
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birthing centers
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Maternal Health Services - standards
Morbidity
Patient Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To study morbidity during the first month of life affecting infants of mothers booked for birth centre care during pregnancy. METHODS: 3238 live single-born infants whose mothers were admitted to an in-hospital birth centre, located at South Hospital in Stockholm, between 1989 and 2000 were compared with 179,502 infants whose mothers received standard maternity care in the Stockholm region during the same period, and who fulfilled the same medical inclusion criteria as those of the birth centre group. Information on other exposures and outcomes was collected from the Swedish Medical Birth and Hospital Discharge Registers. Logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate the odds ratio (OR), using 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: Compared with infants born in standard care, infants in the birth centre group had a higher risk of respiratory problems (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.14-1.69), a difference correlated to less serious respiratory diagnoses. However, the difference was not statistically significant if the birth centre group was compared only with infants born in standard care at South Hospital (OR 1.18; 95% CI 0.94-1.47). Birth centre care was associated with a lower risk of fractures (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.25-0.63). CONCLUSION: Birth centre care was not associated with severe infant morbidity and even appeared to reduce the risk of birth trauma, such as clavicle and other fractures.
PubMed ID
16278990 View in PubMed
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A broader context for maternal mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170962
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Jan 31;174(3):302-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2006
Author
Donna E Stewart
Author Affiliation
Women's Health University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Jan 31;174(3):302-3
Date
Jan-31-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cause of Death
Depression
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - standards
Maternal Mortality - trends
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - mortality - prevention & control - psychology
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders
Violence
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2005 Aug;51:1061-716121822
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Aug 2;173(3):253-916076821
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 May 9;174(10):144716682714
PubMed ID
16446467 View in PubMed
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Source
Katilolehti. 1989 Sep;94(6):4-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
A. Laiho
Source
Katilolehti. 1989 Sep;94(6):4-5
Date
Sep-1989
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Maternal Health Services - standards - trends
Midwifery - standards - trends
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
2628599 View in PubMed
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The Canadian maternity experiences survey: design and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86363
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Mar;30(3):207-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Dzakpasu Susie
Kaczorowski Janusz
Chalmers Beverley
Heaman Maureen
Duggan Joseph
Neusy Elisabeth
Author Affiliation
Health Surveillance and Epidemiology Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Mar;30(3):207-16
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Data Collection - methods
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Female
Health Care Surveys - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Maternal Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Perinatal Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Research Design
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The Maternity Experiences Survey (MES) is an initiative of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System. Its primary objective is to provide representative, pan-Canadian data on women's experiences during pregnancy, birth, and the early postpartum period. METHODS: The development of the survey involved input from a multidisciplinary study group, an extensive consultation process and two pilot studies. TheMES population consisted of birth mothers 15 years of age and over who had a singleton live birth in Canada during a three-month period preceding the 2006 Canadian Census of Population and who lived with their infants at the time of data collection. Experiences of teenage, immigrant, First Nations, Inuit, and Métis mothers were of particular interest. The sample was drawn from the 2006 Canadian Census. A 45-minute interview was conducted at five to 14 months postpartum, primarily by telephone by female professional Statistics Canada interviewers. RESULTS: A response rate of 78% was achieved, corresponding to 6421 women who were weighted to represent an estimated 76508 women. The cooperation rate was 92% and the refusal rate was 1.0%. Item non-response was low, and few data errors were identified. The final MES sample was judged to be representative of the corresponding Census population for all characteristics investigated. CONCLUSION: The MES marks an important milestone in the availability of information on maternity experiences in Canada. For the first time, it is possible to provide high quality data at national, provincial, and territorial levels on a wide spectrum of maternity experiences as reported by women.
PubMed ID
18364098 View in PubMed
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113 records – page 1 of 12.