Skip header and navigation

Refine By

67 records – page 1 of 7.

4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ambient air pollution exposure, residential mobility and term birth weight in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97716
Source
Environ Res. 2010 May;110(4):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Christian Madsen
Ulrike Gehring
Sam Erik Walker
Bert Brunekreef
Hein Stigum
Oyvind Naess
Per Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. christian.madsen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Res. 2010 May;110(4):363-71
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Movements
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Birth weight
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Kinetics
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pregnancy
Term Birth
Young Adult
Abstract
Environmental exposure during pregnancy may have lifelong health consequences for the offspring and some studies have association between maternal exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and offspring's birth weight. However, many of these studies do not take into account small-scale variations in exposure, residential mobility, and work addresses during pregnancy. We used information from the National Birth Registry of Norway to examine associations between ambient environmental exposure such as air pollution and temperature, and offspring's birth weight taking advantage of information on migration history and work address in a large population-based cohort. A dispersion model was used to estimate ambient air pollution levels at all residential addresses and work addresses for a total of 25,229 pregnancies between 1999 and 2002 in Oslo, Norway. Ambient exposure to traffic pollution for the entire pregnancy was associated with a reduction in term birth weight in crude analyzes when comparing children of the highest and lowest exposed mothers. No evidence for an association between exposure to traffic pollution at home and work addresses and term birth weight after adjustment for covariates known to influence birth weight during pregnancy. After stratification, small statistically non-significant reductions were present but only for multiparious mothers. This group also had less residential mobility and less employment during pregnancy. The overall findings suggest no clear association between term birth weight and traffic pollution exposure during pregnancy. However, mobility patterns could introduce possible confounding when examining small-scale variations in exposure by using addresses. This could be of importance in future studies.
PubMed ID
20227069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Binge drinking during pregnancy and risk of seizures in childhood: a study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90910
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb 1;169(3):313-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2009
Author
Sun Yuelian
Strandberg-Larsen Katrine
Vestergaard Mogens
Christensen Jakob
Nybo Andersen Anne-Marie
Grønbaek Morten
Olsen Jørn
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark. ys@soci.au.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb 1;169(3):313-22
Date
Feb-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Seizures - epidemiology
Seizures, Febrile - epidemiology
Abstract
Seizures are often found in children with fetal alcohol syndrome, but it is not known whether binge drinking during pregnancy by nonalcoholic women is associated with an increased risk of seizure disorders in children. The authors conducted a population-based cohort study of 80,526 liveborn singletons in the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002). Information on maternal binge drinking (intake of > or = 5 drinks on a single occasion) was collected in 2 computer-assisted telephone interviews during pregnancy. Children were followed for up to 8 years. Information on neonatal seizures, epilepsy, and febrile seizures was retrieved from the Danish National Hospital Register. Results showed that exposure to binge drinking episodes during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of seizure disorders in children, except for those exposed at 11-16 gestational weeks. These children had a 3.15-fold increased risk of neonatal seizures (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 7.25) and a 1.81-fold increased risk of epilepsy (95% confidence interval: 1.13, 2.90). These findings suggest that maternal binge drinking during a specific time period of pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of specific seizure disorders in the offspring. The results are exploratory, however, and need to be replicated.
PubMed ID
19064645 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular mortality in relation to birth weight of children and grandchildren in 500,000 Norwegian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257690
Source
Eur Heart J. 2013 Nov;34(44):3427-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Oyvind Naess
Camilla Stoltenberg
Dominic A Hoff
Wenche Nystad
Per Magnus
Aage Tverdal
George Davey Smith
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2013 Nov;34(44):3427-36
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Birth Weight - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Child
Fathers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - mortality
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been related to low birth weight, suggesting the foetal environment may program future risk. Alternatively, common genetic factors for both low birth weight and CVD could explain such associations. We investigated associations between offspring birth weight and paternal and maternal cardiovascular mortality and offspring birth weight and cardiovascular mortality among all four grandparents, and further assessed the mediating role of maternal smoking during pregnancy.
All births from 1967 to 2008 that could be linked to parents and grandparents comprised the population (n = 1,004,255). The mortality follow-up among parents was from 1970 to 2008 and among grandparents from 1960 to 2008. The association of grandparental mortality with maternal smoking during pregnancy was analysed in a subpopulation of those born after 1997 (n = 345,624). Per quintile higher in birth weight was related to 0.82 (0.75-0.89) hazard ratio from coronary heart disease in mothers and 0.94 (0.92-0.97) in fathers. For stroke, these were 0.85 (0.78-0.92) and 0.94 (0.89-1.00), respectively. In grandparents for cardiovascular causes, the effects were 0.95 (0.93-0.96) (maternal grandmother), 0.97 (0.96-0.98) (maternal grandfather), 0.96 (0.94-0.98) (paternal grandmother), and 0.98 (0.98-1.00) (paternal grandfather). Adjusting for maternal smoking in pregnancy in the subpopulation accounted for much of the effect on grandparental cardiovascular mortality in all categories of birth weight. For grandparental diabetes mortality, U-shaped associations were seen with grandchild birth weight for the maternal grandmother and inverse associations for all other grandparents.
Associations between CVD mortality in all four grandparents and grandchild birth weight exist, and while genetic and environmental factors may contribute to these, it appears that there is an important role for maternal smoking during pregnancy (and associated paternal smoking) in generating these associations. For diabetes, however, it appears that intrauterine environmental influences and genetic factors contribute to the transgenerational associations.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2013 Nov;34(44):3398-923103662
PubMed ID
22977224 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in concentrations of perfluorinated compounds, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and polychlorinated biphenyls in Norwegian breast-milk during twelve months of lactation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139175
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Dec 15;44(24):9550-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2010
Author
Cathrine Thomsen
Line S Haug
Hein Stigum
May Frøshaug
Sharon L Broadwell
Georg Becher
Author Affiliation
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. cathrine.thomsen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Dec 15;44(24):9550-6
Date
Dec-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alkanesulfonic Acids - metabolism
Breast Feeding
Caprylates - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - metabolism
Female
Fluorocarbons - metabolism
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated - metabolism
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Milk, Human - metabolism
Mothers
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Abstract
At present, scientific knowledge on depuration rates of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is limited and the previous assumptions of considerable reduction of body burdens through breast-feeding have recently been challenged. We therefore studied elimination rates of important POPs in nine Norwegian primiparous mothers and one mother breast-feeding her second child by collecting breast-milk samples (n = 70) monthly from about two weeks to up to twelve months after birth. Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in the breast-milk samples. Linear mixed effect models were established for selected compounds, and significant decreases in the range of 1.2-4.7% in breast-milk concentrations per month were observed for a wide range of PCBs and PBDEs. For the first time, depuration rates for perfluorooctylsulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are presented, being 3.8 and 7.8% per month, respectively (p
Notes
Erratum In: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Apr 1;45(7):3192
PubMed ID
21090747 View in PubMed
Less detail

CHARGE association looking at the future--the voice of a family support group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219893
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Nov-Dec;19(6):395-409
Publication Type
Article
Author
K D Blake
D. Brown
Author Affiliation
Memorial University, St Johns, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Nov-Dec;19(6):395-409
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Case Management - standards
Child
Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Cost of Illness
Developmental Disabilities - etiology - therapy
Education, Special - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hearing Disorders - etiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Movement Disorders - etiology - therapy
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Teratogens
Vision Disorders - etiology - therapy
Voluntary Health Agencies - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CHARGE association is a non-random collection of congenital anomalies. The condition is becoming more widely known to medical and educational professionals. The number of children diagnosed is increasing, probably because of the greater awareness of this condition. This paper considers some of the long-term management problems which are often deferred in the early months, when acute life threatening problems take priority. Questionnaires were sent to parents via the CHARGE Association Family Support Group, UK. Thirty-nine were returned and incomplete information was sought by personal contact or telephone. The majority of children were known professionally to one or both authors and information was therefore checked from medical and educational notes. There is still widespread misunderstanding about the impact of multiple disability, especially when this includes multi-sensory impairment, on the early development of the child. Therefore, the information collected from the study has been from an educational and medical perspective, thereby aiding the understanding of these complex problems. At the parents request, information was gathered about certain teratogens, of which Lindane, an organophosphate, is highlighted.
PubMed ID
9098398 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee and fetal death: a cohort study with prospective data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9107
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 15;162(10):983-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2005
Author
Bodil Hammer Bech
Ellen Aagaard Nohr
Michael Vaeth
Tine Brink Henriksen
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. bhb@soci.au.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Nov 15;162(10):983-90
Date
Nov-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adult
Age Distribution
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Caffeine
Causality
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Cola
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Fetal Mortality
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Tea
Abstract
The authors conducted a cohort study within the Danish National Birth Cohort to determine whether coffee consumption during pregnancy is associated with late fetal death (spontaneous abortion and stillbirth). A total of 88,482 pregnant women recruited from March 1996 to November 2002 participated in a comprehensive interview on coffee consumption and potentially confounding factors in pregnancy. Information on pregnancy outcome was obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Register and medical records. The authors detected 1,102 fetal deaths. High levels of coffee consumption were associated with an increased risk of fetal death. Relative to nonconsumers of coffee, the adjusted hazard ratios for fetal death associated with coffee consumption of 1/2-3, 4-7, and > or =8 cups of coffee per day were 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.89, 1.19), 1.33 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.63), and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.13), respectively. Reverse causation due to unrecognized fetal demise may explain the association between coffee intake and risk of fetal death prior to 20 completed weeks' gestation but not the association with fetal loss following 20 completed weeks' gestation. Consumption of coffee during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of fetal death, especially losses occurring after 20 completed weeks of gestation.
PubMed ID
16207803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing plasma concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and metals in primiparous women from northern and southern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256494
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 May 1;479-480:306-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2014
Author
Meredith S Curren
Karelyn Davis
Chun Lei Liang
Bryan Adlard
Warren G Foster
Shawn G Donaldson
Kami Kandola
Janet Brewster
Mary Potyrala
Jay Van Oostdam
Author Affiliation
Chemicals Surveillance Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, Canada. Electronic address: meredith.curren@hc-sc.gc.ca.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 May 1;479-480:306-18
Date
May-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Lindane - blood
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Metals - blood
Parity
Pregnancy
Abstract
The exposure of Aboriginal peoples in the Canadian Arctic to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals through the consumption of traditional food items is well recognized; however, less information is available for Canadian immigrants. The direct comparison of blood chemical concentrations for expectant primiparous women sampled in the Inuvik and Baffin regions of the Canadian Arctic, as well as Canadian- and foreign-born women from five southern Canadian centers (Halifax, Vancouver, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Calgary), provides relative exposure information for samples of northern and southern mothers in Canada. Based on our analyses, Canadian mothers are exposed to a similar suite of contaminants; however, Inuit first birth mothers residing in the Canadian Arctic had higher age-adjusted geometric mean concentrations for several legacy POPs regulated under the Stockholm Convention, along with lead and total mercury. Significant differences in exposure were observed for Inuit mothers from Baffin who tended to demonstrate higher blood concentrations of POPs and total mercury compared with Inuit mothers from Inuvik. Conversely, northern mothers showed a significantly lower age-adjusted geometric mean concentration for a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-153) compared to southern mothers. Furthermore, southern Canadian mothers born outside of Canada showed the highest individual concentrations measured in the study: 1700 µg/kg lipids for p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and 990 µg/kg lipids for ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (ß-HCH). Data from Cycle 1 (2007-2009) of the nationally-representative Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) places these results in a national biomonitoring context and affirms that foreign-born women of child-bearing age experience higher exposures to many POPs and metals than their Canadian-born counterparts in the general population.
PubMed ID
24576741 View in PubMed
Less detail

Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc in human placentas from two cities in Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63881
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2000 Oct 27;61(4):255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-2000
Author
T D Zadorozhnaja
R E Little
R K Miller
N A Mendel
R J Taylor
B J Presley
B C Gladen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and Gynecology, Kyiv, Ukraine.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2000 Oct 27;61(4):255-63
Date
Oct-27-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arsenic - analysis
Cadmium - analysis
Copper - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Female
Humans
Lead - analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Mercury - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Placenta - chemistry
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Ukraine - epidemiology
Urban health
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Ukraine is a highly industrialized country with major environmental problems and deteriorating reproductive health. Heavy metals are known reproductive toxins; a study was undertaken to determine whether they were present at sufficient concentrations to be playing a major role in these health problems. Placental concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc were determined in 200 women from the general population of two urban areas of Ukraine, Kyiv and Dniprodzerzhinsk. Arsenic was detected in only 5% of the samples, lead in 22%, and mercury in 28%. Cadmium was detected in almost all samples, with a median of 5.2 ng/g. Concentrations of lead, mercury, and cadmium were low compared to those reported elsewhere, while zinc and copper concentrations were comparable.
PubMed ID
11071319 View in PubMed
Less detail

Congenital anomalies in newborns to women employed in jobs with frequent exposure to organic solvents--a register-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130122
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2011;11:83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Arild Vaktskjold
Ljudmila V Talykova
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Helse UMB, Institutt for husdyr og akvakulturvitenskap, Universitetet for miljø- og biovitenskap, Ås, Norway. arild.vaktskjold@umb.no
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2011;11:83
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Registries
Solvents - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
The foetal effects of occupational exposure to organic solvents in pregnancy are still unclear. Our aim was to study the risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomalies at birth in a well-defined population of singletons born to women employed as painters and spoolers in early pregnancy, compared to women in non-hazardous occupations.
The study population for this prospective cohort study was singleton newborns delivered to working mothers in the industrial community of Moncegorsk in the period 1973-2005. Occupational information and characteristics of the women and their newborns was obtained from the local population-based birth register.
The 597 women employed as painters, painter-plasterers or spoolers had 712 singleton births, whereof 31 (4.4%) were perinatally diagnosed with 37 malformations. Among the 10 561 newborns in the group classified as non-exposed, 397 (3.9%) had one or more malformations. The overall prevalence in the exposed group was 520/10 000 births [95% confidence limits (CL): 476, 564], and 436/10 000 births (95% CL: 396, 476) in the unexposed. Adjusted for young maternal age, smoking during pregnancy, maternal congenital malformation and year of birth, the odds ratio (OR) was 1.24 (95% CL: 0.85, 1.82); for multiple anomalies it was 1.54 (95% CL: 0.66, 3.59).The largest organ-system specific difference in prevalence between the two groups was observed for malformations of the circulatory system: 112/10 000 (95% CL: 35, 190) in the exposed group, and 42/10 000 (95% CL: 29, 54) in the unexposed, with an adjusted OR of 2.03 (95% CL: 0.85, 4.84). The adjusted ORs for malformations of the genital organs and musculoskeletal system were 2.24 (95% CI: 0.95, 5.31) and 1.12 (95% CI: (0.62, 2.02), respectively.
There appeared to be a higher risk of malformations of the circulatory system and genital organs at birth among newborns to women in occupations with organic solvent exposure during early pregnancy (predominantly employed as painters). However, the findings were not statistically conclusive. Considering that these two categories of malformations are not readily diagnosed perinatally, the difference in prevalence between the exposed and unexposed may have been underestimated.
Notes
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1988;14(1):1-83407644
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Aug;44(8):527-333651351
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 1995 Aug;37(8):908-148520952
Cites: Teratology. 1996 Aug;54(2):84-928948544
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1997 Apr;54(4):223-89166126
Cites: Epidemiology. 1997 Jul;8(4):355-639209847
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1998 Apr;55(4):284-69624284
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1998 Sep;34(3):288-929698999
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1998 Sep-Oct;27(5):521-319773364
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Mar 24-31;281(12):1106-910188661
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2005 Jan;47(1):37-4415597360
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2006 Jan;63(1):53-816361406
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2006 Feb;32(1):41-5016539171
Cites: AAPS J. 2006;8(2):E419-2416808045
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2006 Sep;63(9):617-2316644895
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 May 11;88(2-3):259-7117127017
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2008 Feb;89(2 Suppl):e1-e2018308046
Cites: Int J Environ Health Res. 2008 Apr;18(2):99-11518365800
Cites: Reprod Sci. 2008 Sep;15(7):631-5018836129
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2009 Jul;66(7):456-6319541806
Cites: Syst Biol Reprod Med. 2010 Apr;56(2):184-20020377315
Cites: Reprod Toxicol. 2010 Nov;30(3):409-1320600819
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2000 Apr;26(2):137-4510817379
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2000 Winter;97(4):319-2511376444
Cites: Hum Reprod Update. 2001 May-Jun;7(3):282-611392374
Cites: J Environ Monit. 1999 Feb;1(1):15-2211529072
Cites: Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):197-20411880761
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Jul;46(5):465-7712176761
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Jan;24(1):22-612196885
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2003 Jul;76(6):405-2312819971
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jan;83(1):58-6914678087
Cites: Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2004 Feb 15;125C(1):4-1114755428
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Mar;63(1):39-6015139240
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1982;50(4):371-67174121
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1983 Apr;9(2 Spec No):89-936648425
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1984 Aug;41(3):305-126743577
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1985 Sep;61:55-673905381
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Feb;18(1):11-71553508
PubMed ID
22032401 View in PubMed
Less detail

67 records – page 1 of 7.