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162 records – page 1 of 17.

Adult and prenatal exposures to tobacco smoke as risk indicators of fertility among 430 Danish couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203830
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1998
Author
T K Jensen
T B Henriksen
N H Hjollund
T. Scheike
H. Kolstad
A. Giwercman
E. Ernst
J P Bonde
N E Skakkebaek
J. Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Nov 15;148(10):992-7
Date
Nov-15-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Menstrual Cycle - drug effects
Odds Ratio
Paternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Semen - drug effects
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
During 1992-1995, 430 Danish couples were recruited after a nationwide mailing of a letter to 52,255 trade union members who were 20-35 years old, lived with a partner, and had no children. The couples were enrolled into the study when they discontinued birth control, and they were followed for six menstrual cycles or until a clinically recognized pregnancy. At enrollment and each month throughout the follow-up, both partners completed a questionnaire that asked them about their smoking, alcohol consumption, and intake of caffeinated beverages. The effect of current smoking and smoking exposure in utero was evaluated by using a logistic regression model with pregnancy outcome of each cycle in a Cox discrete model calculating the fecundability odds ratio. After adjustment for female body mass index and alcohol intake, diseases in female reproductive organs, semen quality, and duration of menstrual cycle, the fecundability odds ratio for smoking women exposed in utero was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.91) compared with unexposed nonsmokers. Fecundability odds ratio for nonsmoking women exposed in utero was 0.70 (95% CI 0.48-1.03) and that for female smokers not exposed in utero was 0.67 (95% CI 0.42-1.06). Exposure in utero was also associated with a decreased fecundability odds ratio in males (0.68, 95% CI 0.48-0.97), whereas present smoking did not reduce fecundability significantly. It seems advisable to encourage smoking cessation prior to the attempt to conceive as well as during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
9829871 View in PubMed
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Adverse reproduction outcomes among employees working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58543
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Helena Wennborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Magnus Stenbeck
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Novum Research Park, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. helena.wennborg@biosci.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Laboratory Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate reproductive outcomes such as birthweight, preterm births, and postterrm births among women working in research laboratories while pregnant. METHODS: Female university personnel were identified from a source cohort of Swedish laboratory employees, and the database was linked to the medical birth register. The first births of the women were included in the analysis, 249 pregnancies among the women with laboratory work and 613 pregnancies among the women without laboratory tasks. Information about exposure to various laboratory agents was obtained from a previous questionnaire investigation at the research group level according to a specific definition. The ponderal index and ratio between observed and expected birthweights were calculated. Logistic regression models were used for analyses of dichotomous outcomes (preterm, postterrm and birthweight). RESULTS: Exposure to laboratory work with solvents was associated with an increased risk of preterm births, the estimated odds ratio (OR) being 3.4 (1.0
PubMed ID
11871853 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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[Allergic diseases and immunological resistance in children from a petroleum area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172980
Source
Gig Sanit. 2005 Jul-Aug;(4):51-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
F F Dautov
S A Iurk
R F Khakimova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2005 Jul-Aug;(4):51-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Child, Preschool
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Petroleum
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The incidence of allergic diseases was studied in the children living in an oil-extracting region of the Republic of Udmurtia. A hygienic assessment of the level of environmental pollution was made in the study areas. The increased atmospheric contamination was ascertained to cause an increase in the incidence of allergic diseases in children. There was a correlation between the concentration of noxious substances as part of the ambient air and the prevalence of allergic diseases in children. The studies suggest that the children living in the oil-extracting area have worse parameters of nonspecific resistance than do the control children. The findings serve as the basis for developing measure to lower environmental pollution and to reduce the incidence of allergic diseases in children.
PubMed ID
16149313 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics in pregnancy increase children's risk of otitis media and ventilation tubes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283543
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Tine Marie Pedersen
Jakob Stokholm
Jonathan Thorsen
Anna-Rosa Cecilie Mora-Jensen
Hans Bisgaard
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Ear Ventilation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To study the association between antibiotic intake in pregnancy and the development of otitis media and placement of ventilation tubes (VTs) in the offspring under the hypothesis that antibiotics in pregnancy may alter the offspring's propensity for disease.
Data from the 700 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2010 unselected birth cohort study were used. Information on maternal antibiotic use and other exposures during pregnancy was collected prospectively from interviews and validated in national registries. Otitis media episodes were registered in a prospective diary for 3 years. Information regarding children's VTs was obtained from national registries.
There were 514 children who had diary information and were included in the analysis regarding otitis media episodes. For VTs analysis, 699 children were included. Thirty-seven percent of the mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy, and this was associated with increased risk of otitis media (adjusted hazard ratio 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.63; P?=?.02). The risk of receiving VTs was especially associated with third trimester antibiotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.60; 95% CI 1.08-2.36, P?=?.02). The risk of otitis media increased with increasing number of treatments (per-level adjusted hazard ratio 1.20; 95% CI 1.04-1.40; P?=?.02), but for VTs this association was not significant after adjustment.
Maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of otitis media and VT insertions in the offspring. Antibiotics late in pregnancy mainly contributed to these effects, pointing toward potential transmission of an unfavorable microbiome from mother to child.
PubMed ID
28088397 View in PubMed
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[Application of a standardized-human biomonitoring methodology to assess prenatal exposure to mercury].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263391
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):10-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A I Egorov
I N Ilchenko
S M Lyapunov
E V Marochkina
O I Okina
B V Ermolaev
T V Karamysheva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):10-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Food Habits
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mercury - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Russia
Seafood
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
World Health Organization
Abstract
World Health Organization (WHO), in cooperation with the Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (COPHES), has developed a standardized methodology for human biomonitoring (HBM) surveys in maternities in order to assess prenatal exposure to mercury. To test this standard methodology and adapt it to Russian settings, a cross-sectional HBM survey involving 120 parturient women was conducted in six maternities of the Moscow Region. Levels of total mercury in maternal hair (geometric mean: 0.21 µg/g, 95th percentile: 0.54 µg/g), cord blood (0.89 µg/L and 2.38 µg/L, respectively) and maternal urine (0.27 µg/L and 0.94 µg/L) in this population were similar to those in other European countries with relatively low fish consumption. Consumption of all types of fish at least once per week during the third trimester of pregnancy compared to fish consumption less than once per month was associated with the increase of geometric mean level of total mercury: in hair by 31% (95% confidence interval: 4%, 66%) higher, in cord blood--by 38% (9%, 74%) and in maternal urine--by 36% (2%, 81%). No biomarker values exceeded levels recommended by WHO or national agencies in the USA and Germany. However; at the population level, adverse effects of prenatal exposures to mercury can still be substantial.
PubMed ID
25831921 View in PubMed
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Are girls more susceptible to the effects of prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke on asthma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161883
Source
Epidemiology. 2007 Sep;18(5):573-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. j.jaakkola@bham.ac.uk
Source
Epidemiology. 2007 Sep;18(5):573-6
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke through mother's smoking increases the risk of developing asthma later in life. A recent study suggested that this effect is present only in girls. We explored potential differences in susceptibility between boys and girls.
We followed all 58,841 Finnish singleton babies born in 1987 through 5 nationwide registries for 7 years and identified all cases of doctor-diagnosed asthma (ICD-9 code 493). The birth registry provided categorical information on the mother's smoking during pregnancy: no smoking (reference), low exposure (10 cigarettes per day).
In girls the cumulative incidence of asthma was 0.0245 in the reference group, 0.0310 in the low maternal smoking group (risk difference = 0.0065; 95% CI = 0.0053-0.0076), and 0.0360 in the high maternal smoking group (0.0115; 0.0096-0.0133). The corresponding cumulative incidences for boys were 0.0405, 0.0501 (0.0096; 0.0089-0.0103), and 0.0522 (0.0117; 0.0091-0.0142). In logistic regression analysis adjusting for confounding, the combined effect of male sex and high maternal smoking (compared with female sex and no smoking) was 112% excess risk. This corresponded closely to what would be expected from the additive independent effects of male sex (67% excess risk) and high maternal smoking (44% excess risk).
Effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy on the risk of developing asthma are similar in boys and girls, with no interaction on an additive scale.
PubMed ID
17700244 View in PubMed
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Association between maternal exposure to ambient air pollutants during pregnancy and fetal growth restriction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169079
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2007 Aug;17(5):426-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Shiliang Liu
Daniel Krewski
Yuanli Shi
Yue Chen
Richard T Burnett
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Ontario, Canada. Sliu@uottawa.ca
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2007 Aug;17(5):426-32
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - metabolism - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada
Carbon Monoxide - metabolism - toxicity
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Nitrogen Dioxide - metabolism - toxicity
Ozone - metabolism - toxicity
Particle Size
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - drug effects - metabolism
Risk assessment
Sulfur Dioxide - metabolism - toxicity
Time Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Previous research demonstrated consistent associations between ambient air pollution and emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and mortality. Effect of air pollution on perinatal outcomes has recently drawn more attention. We examined the association between intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) among singleton term live births and sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and fine particles (PM2.5) present in ambient air in the Canadian cities of Calgary, Edmonton, and Montreal for the period 1985-2000. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for IUGR, based on average daily levels of individual pollutants over each month and trimester of pregnancy after adjustment for maternal age, parity, infant gender, season, and city of residence. A 1 ppm increase in CO was associated with an increased risk of IUGR in the first (OR=1.18; 95% CI 1.14-1.23), second (OR=1.15; 95% CI 1.10-1.19) and third (OR=1.19; 95% CI 1.14-1.24) trimesters of pregnancy, respectively. A 20 ppb increase in NO2 (OR=1.16; 95% CI 1.09-1.24; OR=1.14; 95% CI 1.06--1.21; and OR=1.16; 95% CI 1.09-1.24 in the first, second, and third trimesters) and a 10 mug/m3 increase in PM2.5 (OR=1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.10; OR=1.06; 95% CI 1.03-1.10; and OR=1.06; 95% CI 1.03-1.10) were also associated with an increased risk of IUGR. Consistent results were found when ORs were calculated by month rather than trimester of pregnancy. Our findings add to the emerging body of evidence that exposure to relatively low levels of ambient air pollutants in urban areas during pregnancy is associated with adverse effects on fetal growth.
PubMed ID
16736056 View in PubMed
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Association between organic dietary choice during pregnancy and hypospadias in offspring: a study of mothers of 306 boys operated on for hypospadias.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120122
Source
J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):1077-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jeppe Schultz Christensen
Camilla Asklund
Niels E Skakkebæk
Niels Jørgensen
Helle Raun Andersen
Troels Munch Jørgensen
Lars Henning Olsen
Anette Pernille Høyer
Jan Moesgaard
Jørgen Thorup
Tina Kold Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):1077-82
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male - methods
Abstract
The etiology of hypospadias is poorly understood. Exposure to pesticides has been considered a risk factor, although findings are inconsistent. Diet constitutes a significant exposure route for pesticides, and pesticide residues are more frequently reported in conventional than organic food products. We examined the association between organic dietary choice during pregnancy and presence of hypospadias in the offspring.
Mothers of 306 boys operated on for hypospadias were frequency matched for geography and child birth year to 306 mothers of healthy boys in a case-control study. Telephone interviews were conducted regarding demographic and lifestyle factors, including intake and organic choice of selected food items (milk, dairy products, egg, fruit, vegetables and meat). Logistic regression models were constructed for dietary variables, and odds ratios were calculated controlling for maternal age, body mass index and alcohol consumption.
Overall organic choice of food items during pregnancy was not associated with hypospadias in the offspring. However, frequent current consumption of high fat dairy products (milk, butter) while rarely or never choosing the organic alternative to these products during pregnancy was associated with increased odds of hypospadias (adjusted OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.09-4.36).
This large case-control study of boys operated on for hypospadias suggests an association between hypospadias in the offspring and the mother not choosing the organic alternative, and having a high current intake of nonorganic butter and cheese. This finding could be due to chemical contamination of high fat dairy products. However, general lifestyle and health behavior related to choosing organic alternatives may also explain the finding.
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):798-923246851
PubMed ID
23036983 View in PubMed
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162 records – page 1 of 17.