Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1461 records – page 1 of 147.

A 28 year follow up of mortality among women who smoked during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23125
Source
BMJ. 1995 Aug 19;311(7003):477-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1995
Author
P. Rantakallio
E. Läärä
M. Koiranen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1995 Aug 19;311(7003):477-80
Date
Aug-19-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - mortality
Prevalence
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To investigate long term mortality among women who smoked during pregnancy and those who stopped smoking. DESIGN--A follow up of a geographically defined cohort from 1966 through to 1993. SUBJECTS--11,994 women in northern Finland expected to deliver in 1966, comprising 96% of all women giving birth in the area during that year. Smoking habits were recorded during pregnancy but not later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Mortality by cause (571 deaths). RESULTS--The mortality ratio adjusted for age, place of residence, years of education and marital status was 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.8 to 2.8) for the women who smoked during pregnancy and 1.6 (1.1 to 2.2) for those who stopped smoking before the second month of pregnancy, both compared with non-smokers. Among the smokers the relative mortality was higher for typical diseases related to tobacco intake, such as respiratory and oesophageal cancer and diseases of the cardiovascular and digestive organs and also for accidents and suicides. CONCLUSION--The risk of premature death seems to be higher in women who smoke during pregnancy than in other women who smoke. This may be explained either by the low proportion of those who stop later and the high proportion of heavy smokers or by other characteristics of these subjects that increase the risk.
PubMed ID
7647642 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal Wall Defects in Greenland 1989-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292123
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Jul 03; 109(11):836-842
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-03-2017
Author
Merete Bugge
Gitte Drachmann
Peder Kern
Esben Budtz-Jørgensen
Hans Eiberg
Britta Olsen
Niels Tommerup
Inge-Merete Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Wilhelm Johannsen Centre for Functional Genome Research, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Birth Defects Res. 2017 Jul 03; 109(11):836-842
Date
Jul-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Wall - physiopathology
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Digestive System Abnormalities - complications
Female
Gastroschisis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Greenland
Hernia, Umbilical - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Registries
Stillbirth
Abstract
In the last decades, an increasing rate of gastroschisis but not of omphalocele has been reported worldwide. Greenland is the world's largest island, but 80% is covered by an ice cap, it has a small population of around 56,000 peoples (as of 2016). The occurrence of abdominal wall defects has never been investigated in Greenland.
The present study is based on data retrieved from three nationwide and two local registries in the Greenlandic health care system over 27 years (1989-2015).
We identified 33 infants with abdominal wall defects born in the study time period. All cases were reclassified to 28 cases of gastroschisis, four cases of omphalocele, and there was 1 infant in the indeterminate group. The point prevalence at birth for gastroschisis increased significantly from 8 to 35 (average 10.7) per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants. Mothers below 20 years of age represented 23% of all cases and the prevalence for this group was 17 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn. Perinatal mortality for infants with gastroschisis was high (18%), and 1 year survival was 71%. For omphalocele, the prevalence varied from 8 to 11 per 10,000 liveborn and stillborn infants. There was no increasing rate in the period, further highlighting an etiological difference between gastroschisis and omphalocele.
This study confirms the increasing prevalence of gastroschisis in Greenland in the period from 1989 to 2015. The average was 10.7 per 10,000 liveborn and -stillborn infants and, to the best of our knowledge, this is the highest prevalence ever reported. Birth Defects Research 109:836-842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
28464537 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's health: acting now for a healthy future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153251
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jacqueline Boyle
Alice R Rumbold
Marilyn Clarke
Chris Hughes
Simon Kane
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Gynecology - standards
Humans
Maternal Age
Obstetrics - standards
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper summarises the recent RANZCOG Indigenous Women's Health Meeting with recommendations on how the College and its membership can act now to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and infants.
PubMed ID
19133037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
of inflicted head trauma. Keenan and others conducted a population- based study of inflicted TBI in North Carolina among children < 2 years of age and found an annual incidence of 17 per 100,000 person-years. Young age, male sex, young maternal age, non-European American decent and multiple
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1995 May-Jun;110(3):277-817610215
Cites: Pediatr Ann. 1989 Aug;18(8):482-4, 486-9, 492-42671890
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Oct 22;339(17):1211-69780342
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Dec 5;317(7172):1558-619836654
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Aug 4;282(5):463-710442662
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Dec;27(5):379-8415556737
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Jul;159(7):665-7015997001
Cites: N C Med J. 2005 Sep-Oct;66(5):360-316323583
Cites: Inj Prev. 2006 Dec;12 Suppl 2:ii3-ii517170168
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Feb;98(2):296-30317538060
Cites: Inj Prev. 2013 Apr;19(2):139-4222850082
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Aug;110(2 Pt 1):e1812165617
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Aug 6;290(5):621-612902365
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Jul;126(1):e104-1520530077
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2010 Dec;34(12):951-821035186
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:721208410
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2012 Aug;43(2):215-2022813688
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2009 Nov;33(11):791-80819853915
Cites: Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2008 Nov;82(11):822-918985680
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Apr;34(4 Suppl):S157-6218374268
Cites: J Paediatr Child Health. 2008 Mar;44(3):99-10718086144
Cites: Scott Med J. 1998 Aug;43(4):112-49757501
PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

The accident at Chernobyl and trisomy 21 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36798
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
T. Harjulehto-Mervaala
R. Salonen
T. Aro
L. Saxén
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mutat Res. 1992 Mar;275(2):81-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Cesium Radioisotopes - adverse effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21 - radiation effects
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Matched-Pair Analysis
Maternal Age
Nuclear Reactors
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prevalence
Radioactive Fallout - adverse effects
Trisomy
Ukraine
Abstract
Our objective was to explore whether the radiation fallout in Finland after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 led to an increased incidence of trisomy 21. In this geographic and temporal cohort study, the country was divided into three zones according to the amounts of radioactive fallout and internal radiation caused by two cesium isotopes. The 518 cytologically verified cases of trisomy 21 were divided into a control group (conceived before the accident), and a study group of children whose expected dates of birth were in the post-accident years 1987-1988, i.e., pregnancies commenced after May 1986. The cases were also divided into three subgroups according to the zones of radiation. There were no significant differences in prevalence of trisomy 21 between the control and study groups nor between the three zones in spite of the significant differences in the levels of radiation and in the body burden that prevailed throughout the study period. Power estimates showed that in the two zones of lower radiation, an increase of 0.5% in the prevalence would have been detected with a power of 0.85, and in the somewhat smaller zone of the highest radiation, with a power of 0.70. The study lends no further support to the view that the low radiation fallout in western Europe would have been causally associated with trisomy 21.
PubMed ID
1379341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acta sixty years ago. On abortions in Oslo, fistulas in Helsinki, elderly primiparas in Stockholm, and more.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65123
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1991;70(2):101-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991

[A decrease in twin births and factors involved in multiple pregnancy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252336
Source
Genetika. 1975 Apr;11(4):150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1975
Author
N G Lipovetskaia
Iu A Iampol'skaia
Source
Genetika. 1975 Apr;11(4):150-7
Date
Apr-1975
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Menarche
Moscow
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Twins
Abstract
The object of this investigation were the causes of the decrease of the frequency of twin births during the last two decades. In Moscow this frequency decreased from 1,19% in 1956 to 0,7% in 1973. Among the births the proportion of first births was observed to increase, as well as the proportion of very young mothers. The effect of this process on the women characterized by a tendency to polyembryony was more conspicuous, than in the average on the population as a whole. During the last decades the process of acceleration of puberty was observed both in the mothers of twins and in all the women in general. However a somewhat later onset of first menstruations is characteristic of the women having a tendency to polyembryony-Hormonal changes taking place in the course of acceleration are apparently one of the causes of the decrease of the twin births frequency.
PubMed ID
1228064 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1988 Aug;23(3):359-803403275
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1989 May-Jun;5(3):157-632663051
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1989 Summer;10(4):1-1510313273
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1990 Sep-Oct;105(5):533-52120734
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1990 Winter;9(4):91-1112289763
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1987 Summer;12(2):221-353302000
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1991 May-Jun;23(3):123-81860478
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent marriage and childbearing: the long-term economic outcome, Canada in the 1980s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233693
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C F Grindstaff
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Economics
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Humans
Income
Marriage
Maternal Age
Occupations
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-term economic outcomes (education, labor force participation, occupation, and income) associated with female adolescent marriage and childbearing. The 1981 Canadian census is the data source for all women in Canada at age 30, controlling for age at marriage and at first birth. The data suggest that women at age 30 in Canada are in the best economic circumstances when they remain single or when they marry at age 20 or older and either remain childless or begin their childbearing at age 25 or older. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
3381686 View in PubMed
Less detail

1461 records – page 1 of 147.