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286 records – page 1 of 29.

Source
CMAJ. 2002 Feb 5;166(3):299-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2002
Author
Dalia L Rotstein
David A Alter
Dalis L Rotstein
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Feb 5;166(3):299-300
Date
Feb-5-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Canada
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Time and Motion Studies
Notes
Cites: Health Policy. 1996 Apr;36(1):17-3510172629
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Aug 7;165(3):277-8311517642
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 May 5;158(9):1151-39597966
Cites: Health Policy. 2000 May;52(1):15-3210899642
Cites: Br J Surg. 2000 Aug;87(8):1082-610931055
Erratum In: CMAJ 2002 Apr 30;166(9):1135Rotstein Dalis L [corrected to Rotstein Dalia L]
PubMed ID
11868633 View in PubMed
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Agreement between birthplace and self-reported ethnicity in a population-based mammography service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154371
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2008 Jul-Sep;9(3):511-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chris D Bajdik
M C Barroetavena
S R Saroa
T Gregory Hislop
Author Affiliation
BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver BC, Canada. cbajdik@bccrc.ca
Source
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2008 Jul-Sep;9(3):511-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Early Detection of Cancer
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mammography
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Self Disclosure
Abstract
Ethnicity is associated with genetic, environmental, lifestyle and social constructs. Difficult to define using a single variable, but strongly predictive of health outcomes and useful for planning healthcare services, it is often lacking in administrative databases, necessitating the use of a surrogate measure. A potential surrogate for ethnicity is birthplace. Our aim was to measure the agreement between birthplace and ethnicity among six major ethic groups as recorded at the population-based mammography service for British Columbia, Canada (BC).
We used records from the most-recent visits of women attending the Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia to cross-tabulate women's birthplaces and self-reported ethnicities, and separately considered results for the time periods 1990-1999 and 2000-2006. In general, we combined countries according to the system adopted by the United Nations, and defined ethnic groups that correspond to the nation groups. The analysis considered birthplaces and corresponding ethnicities for South Asia, East/Southeast Asia, North Europe, South Europe, East Europe, West Europe and all other nations combined. We used the kappa statistic to measure the concordance between self-reported ethnicity and birthplace.
Except for the 'Other' category, the most-common birthplace was East/Southeast Asia and the most-common ethnicity was East/Southeast Asian. The agreement between birthplace and self-reported ethnicity was poor overall, as evidenced by kappa scores of 0.22 in both 1990-1999 and 2000-2006. There was substantial agreement between ethnicity and birthplace for South Asians, excellent agreement for East/Southeast Asians, but poor agreement for Europeans.
Birthplace can be used as a surrogate for ethnicity amongst people with South Asian and East/Southeast Asian ethnicity in BC.
PubMed ID
18990030 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Native Women's Wellness Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3977
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):487-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Stillwater
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1999 Sep-Oct;20(5):487-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Women's health
Abstract
Alaska Native women have encountered many obstacles in the health care system which deter them from adhering to cancer screening recommendations. To improve access, it was necessary for us to listen to them and their attitudes about health care. As a result of this assessment, we changed our approach resulting in an overall increase in screening rates from 14% to 62%. A case example is presented to demonstrate barriers to cancer screening and our techniques for overcoming them.
PubMed ID
10776117 View in PubMed
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An interview by Paul C Adams. Colorectal cancer screening: opportunistic or organized?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169508
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr;20(4):249-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Linda Rabeneck
Author Affiliation
Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5. Linda.Rabeneck@sw.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr;20(4):249-50
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonoscopy
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis
Humans
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Ontario
United States
PubMed ID
16649293 View in PubMed
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Applying the small-area estimation method to estimate a population eligible for breast cancer detection services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84960
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Jan;5(1):A10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Knutson Kirsten
Zhang Weihong
Tabnak Farzaneh
Author Affiliation
California Department of Public Health, CDIC/Cancer Detection Section, MS 7203, PO Box 997413, Sacramento, CA 95899-7413, USA. Kirsten.Knutson@cdph.ca.gov
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2008 Jan;5(1):A10
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
California
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - organization & administration - utilization
Middle Aged
Monte Carlo Method
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Preventive Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Public Health
Risk assessment
Small-Area Analysis
Statistics as Topic
Women's Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Populations eligible for public health programs are often narrowly defined and, therefore, difficult to describe quantitatively, particularly at the local level, because of lack of data. This information, however, is vital for program planning and evaluation. We demonstrate the application of a statistical method using multiple sources of data to generate county estimates of women eligible for free breast cancer screening and diagnostic services through California's Cancer Detection Programs: Every Woman Counts. METHODS: We used the small-area estimation method to determine the proportion of eligible women by county and racial/ethnic group. To do so, we included individual and community data in a generalized, linear, mixed-effect model. RESULTS: Our method yielded widely varied estimated proportions of service-eligible women at the county level. In all counties, the estimated proportion of eligible women was higher for Hispanics than for whites, blacks, Asian/Pacific Islanders, or American Indian/Alaska Natives. Across counties, the estimated proportions of eligible Hispanic women varied more than did those of women of other races. CONCLUSION: The small-area estimation method is a powerful tool for approximating narrowly defined eligible or target populations that are not represented fully in any one data source. The variability and reliability of the estimates are measurable and meaningful. Public health programs can use this method to estimate the size of local populations eligible for, or in need of, preventive health services and interventions.
PubMed ID
18081999 View in PubMed
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[A screening procedure for health factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143360
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
P I Sidorov
I A Novikova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):85-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
A health environment screening procedure has been developed, which is a questionnaire assessing the significance of factors, such as lifestyle, habitat, genetics, public health care, mentality. The developed procedure can ascertain the contribution of each factor to the health of man or a group of individuals, thus defining the factors that may cause diseases, optimize, and individualize the organization of prophylactic care.
PubMed ID
20496497 View in PubMed
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286 records – page 1 of 29.