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The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009;12(3):72-919553768
Cites: Health Manag Technol. 2012 Mar;33(3):12-322515048
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):33-920186354
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e2720584706
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;25(2):78-8221321678
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct;25(10):547-5422059159
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;26(1):17-3122308578
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related discussions in primary care: a report from ASPN. Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199407
Source
J Fam Pract. 2000 Jan;49(1):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
D C Vinson
N. Elder
J J Werner
L A Vorel
P A Nutting
Author Affiliation
University of Missouri-Columbia, Family Medicine, 65212, USA. VinsonD@health.missouri.edu
Source
J Fam Pract. 2000 Jan;49(1):28-33
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Canada
Family Practice - education - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Nurse Practitioners - education - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physician Assistants - education - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Problem drinking is common, and a 15-minute intervention can help some patients reduce drinking to safe levels. Little is known, however, about the frequency and duration of alcohol-related discussions in primary care.
Nineteen clinicians in the Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network (ASPN) collected data about alcohol-related discussions for 1 week following their usual office routine (Phase 1) and for 1 week with the addition of routine screening for problem drinking (Phase 2). Of those, 15 clinicians collected data for a third week after receiving training in brief interventions with problem drinkers (Phase 3). Clinicians collected data on standard ASPN reporting cards.
In Phase 1 the clinicians discussed alcohol during 9.6% of all visits. Seventy-three percent of those discussions were shorter than 2 minutes long, and only 10% lasted longer than 4 minutes. When routine screening was added (Phase 2), clinicians were more likely to discuss alcohol at acute-illness visits, but the frequency, duration, and intensity of such discussions did not change. Only 32% of Phase 2 discussions prompted by a positive screening result lasted longer than 2 minutes. After training, the duration increased (P
PubMed ID
10678337 View in PubMed
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Antisocial process screening device: validation on a Russian sample of juvenile delinquents with the emphasis on the role of personality and parental rearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155198
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie Väfors Fritz
Vladislav Ruchkin
Roman Koposov
Britt Af Klinteberg
Author Affiliation
Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - enzymology - epidemiology - psychology
Child Rearing
Comorbidity
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Parenting - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Russia - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were 1) to validate the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) in a sample of Russian juvenile delinquents; 2) to examine subgroups of delinquents with higher versus lower levels of childhood problem behaviors with respect to the APSD subscales, personality traits, and parental rearing; and 3) to attempt to replicate the previous finding that the APSD subscale measuring callous/unemotional traits can differentiate subgroups of delinquents with different precursors for problem behaviors (predominantly biological versus predominantly social). A group of 250 Russian juvenile inmates (mean age=16.4) was examined by means of the APSD completed by the staff at the correctional institution. The inmates completed several self-reports assessing their current and childhood behavior problems, personality traits and experienced parental rearing practices. A factor structure of the APSD was obtained that is similar, albeit not identical, to that from the original studies by Frick and colleagues [Frick, P.J., O'Brien, B.S., Wootton, J.M., McBurnett, K., (1994). Psychopathy and conduct problems in children. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 700-707]; [Frick, P.J., Barry, C.T., Bodin, S.D., (1999). Applying the concept of psychopathy to children: Implications for the Assessment of antisocial youth. In Gacono, C.B. (Ed), The clinical and forensic assessment of psychopathy: A practitioners guide. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum]; [Frick, P.J., Lilienfeld, S.O., Ellis, M., Loney, B., Silverthorn, P., (1999). The association between anxiety and psychopathy dimensions in children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 27, 383-392]; callous unemotional traits in the present sample were expressed in manipulative behavior. Results further disclosed higher levels of antisocial and aggressive activities, higher levels of personality attributes such as narcissism and novelty seeking, as well as lower cooperativeness, and negatively perceived parental rearing in a subgroup with higher (versus lower) number of childhood symptoms of conduct disorder and oppositional disorder. The juvenile delinquents with higher levels as compared to lower levels of callous unemotional traits also perceived their parents as using more negative rearing strategies. The findings are discussed in terms of interactional processes between personality of the juvenile delinquents and parental rearing in the development of antisocial behavior.
PubMed ID
18790536 View in PubMed
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Ascertainment and evaluation of interval cancers in population-based mammography screening programmes: a collaborative study in four European centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17094
Source
J Med Screen. 2005;12(1):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Sven Törnberg
Mary Codd
Vitor Rodrigues
Nereo Segnan
Antonio Ponti
Author Affiliation
Cancer Screening Unit, Oncologic Centre M8, Karolinska University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.tornberg@sll.se
Source
J Med Screen. 2005;12(1):43-9
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cooperative Behavior
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Mammography - methods
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the present study was to estimate the interval cancer (IC) rates in four population-based mammography screening programmes in four countries with different health-care environments, different access to cancer registry data, and different age groups of women invited. SETTING: The screening programmes in Coimbra (Portugal), Dublin (Ireland), Stockholm (Sweden), and Turin (Italy) participated in the study. METHODS: All cancer cases were searched for in cancer registries. IC rates and other outcome measures from the screening programmes were estimated and compared between the centres. Poisson regression model was used to estimate the proportional incidence based on IC rate in relation to expected total breast cancer incidence rate in the absence of screening. RESULTS: There was a more than tenfold difference in the number of invited women at the first round between the involved centres. The IC rates varied between 4.3 and 23.8 per 10,000 women screened. The levels of IC rates in relation to the estimated background incidence varied from 0.35 up to 0.46 depending on age groups involved in the programme, but did not differ significantly between three of the four involved centres. CONCLUSIONS: IC rates were quite similar between three of the four centres despite the differences in target population, invited ages, length of building-up of the programmes and different health-care organizations. Different access to complete cancer registry data is likely to explain the lower IC rates in the fourth centre.
PubMed ID
15814019 View in PubMed
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Asymptomatic breast cancer in non-participants of the national screening programme in Norway: a confounding factor in evaluation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128414
Source
J Med Screen. 2012 Dec;19(4):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Solveig R Hoff
Olbjørn Klepp
Solveig Hofvind
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Aalesund Hospital, Helse Møre og Romsdal HF, NO-6026 Aalesund, Norway. sorohoff@gmail.com
Source
J Med Screen. 2012 Dec;19(4):177-83
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Asymptomatic Diseases - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Carcinoma in Situ - diagnosis - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Abstract
To evaluate the extent and histopathological characteristics of asymptomatic breast cancer detected outside the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) in women targeted by the programme.
Our study included 568 primary breast cancers (523 invasive and 45 ductal carcinoma in situ) diagnosed in 553 women aged 50-70, residing in Møre og Romsdal County, 2002-2008. The cancers were divided into screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, interval cancers (ICs) and cancers detected in women not participating in the NBCSP (never participated and lapsed attendees), and further into asymptomatic and symptomatic cancers. Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI) was used for comparisons across the groups and the distributions were compared using chi-square tests for statistical significance.
Twenty percent (19/97) of the ICs and 32% (69/213) of the breast cancers in non-participants were asymptomatic, with opportunistic screening as the most frequent detection method (42%, 8/19 for ICs and 54%, 37/69 for non-participants). There were no differences in distribution of NPI prognostic categories across subgroups of asymptomatic invasive cancers (screening-detected cancers in the NBCSP, asymptomatic ICs and asymptomatic cancers in non-participants) or between subgroups of symptomatic invasive cancers (symptomatic ICs and symptomatic cancers in non-participants). Asymptomatic cancers had a significantly more favourable distribution of NPI prognostic categories compared with symptomatic cancers (P
PubMed ID
23486698 View in PubMed
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The autism--tics, AD/HD and other comorbidities inventory (A-TAC): further validation of a telephone interview for epidemiological research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98441
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tomas Larson
Henrik Anckarsäter
Carina Gillberg
Ola Ståhlberg
Eva Carlström
Björn Kadesjö
Maria Råstam
Paul Lichtenstein
Christopher Gillberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö/Lund, Sweden. Tomas.Larson@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2010;10:1
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Parents - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Tic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Reliable, valid, and easy-to-administer instruments to identify possible caseness and to provide proxies for clinical diagnoses are needed in epidemiological research on child and adolescent mental health.The aim of this study is to provide further validity data for a parent telephone interview focused on Autism--Tics, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), and other Comorbidities (A-TAC), for which reliability and preliminary validation data have been previously reported. METHODS: Parents of 91 children clinically diagnosed at a specialized Child Neuropsychiatric Clinic, 366 control children and 319 children for whom clinical diagnoses had been previously assigned were interviewed by the A-TAC over the phone. Interviewers were blind to clinical information. Different scores from the A-TAC were compared to the diagnostic outcome. RESULTS: Areas under ROC curves for interview scores as predictors of clinical diagnoses were around 0.95 for most disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), tic disorders, developmental coordination disorders (DCD) and learning disorders, indicating excellent screening properties. Screening cut-off scores with sensitivities above 0.90 (0.95 for ASD and AD/HD) were established for most conditions, as well as cut-off scores to identify proxies to clinical diagnoses with specificities above 0.90 (0.95 for ASD and AD/HD). CONCLUSIONS: The previously reported validity of the A-TAC was supported by this larger replication study using broader scales from the A-TAC-items and a larger number of diagnostic categories. Short versions of algorithms worked as well as larger. Different cut-off levels for screening versus identifying proxies for clinical diagnoses are warranted. Data on the validity for mood problems and oppositional defiant/conduct problems are still lacking. Although the A-TAC is principally intended for epidemiological research and general investigations, the instrument may be useful as a tool to collect information in clinical practice as well.
PubMed ID
20055988 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose, glucose balance, and disease-specific survival after prostate cancer diagnosis in the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310699
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2019 09; 22(3):453-460
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
09-2019
Author
Teemu J Murtola
Samueli M Sälli
Kirsi Talala
Kimmo Taari
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland. teemu.murtola@uta.fi.
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2019 09; 22(3):453-460
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - analysis - drug effects - metabolism
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy
Disease Progression
Fasting - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glycated Hemoglobin A - analysis
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - complications
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Prospective Studies
Prostate - pathology
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus has been linked with adverse prostate cancer (PCa) outcomes. However, role of hyperglycemia in PCa progression is unclear. We evaluated the link between hyperglycemia and PCa survival among Finnish PCa patients.
The study cohort included 1770 men with data on fasting glucose and diagnosed with PCa within the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for PCa in 1995-2009. Additionally, 1398 men had data on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Information on fasting glucose and HbA1c measurements was obtained from the regional laboratory database. Antidiabetic medication use was obtained from the prescription database of the Social Insurance Institution (SII). Time-dependent Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals for PCa death among diabetic, impaired glucose tolerant, and normoglycemic men.
During median follow-up of 9.9 years after the diagnosis, 182 men died from PCa. After adjustment for tumor stage, Gleason grade, and PSA level at diagnosis, diabetic fasting glucose level after PCa diagnosis was associated with elevated risk of PCa death compared to normoglycemic men (HR 1.67 95% CI 1.18-2.36). The risk association was strongest among participants with localized cancer at diagnosis; HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.45-3.93. The risk elevation was observed for glucose measurements taken up to 5 years earlier. Diabetic glucose levels measured before the diagnosis were not associated with PCa death.
Our study cohort suggests an increased risk of PCa death in men with diabetic fasting blood glucose levels, supporting the role of hyperglycemia as a risk factor for PCa progression.
PubMed ID
30679762 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening programme as setting for an adjunct research project: effect on programme attendance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85788
Source
J Med Screen. 2008;15(1):44-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Gram Inger T
Lund Eiliv
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Breivika N-9037, Norway. inger.gram@ism.uit.no
Source
J Med Screen. 2008;15(1):44-5
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - methods
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine if an adjunct research project to a breast cancer screening programme would affect the high programme attendance. Women residing in the municipality of Tromsø aged 55 years or older, scheduled to receive an invitation letter to their first screening round in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme during our 15-week recruitment period, were eligible. We randomly selected up to 25 invitees per screening day to receive a mailed request to participate in the research project named the Tromsø Mammography and Breast Cancer study. These women constituted the study arm, while the remaining eligible invitees served as the control arm. The attendance rate to the screening programme was 80.1% among the 253 women in the study arm and 74.8% among the 397 women in the control arm (P = 0.09). Our trial finds no effect on the high attendance to the breast cancer screening programme indicating that cancer screening programmes might be suitable settings for adjunct research projects.
PubMed ID
18416955 View in PubMed
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The Brief Child and Family Phone Interview (BCFPI): 1. Rationale, development, and description of a computerized children's mental health intake and outcome assessment tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154158
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;50(4):416-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Charles E Cunningham
Michael H Boyle
Sunjin Hong
Peter Pettingill
Donna Bohaychuk
Author Affiliation
Offord Centre for Child Studies, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;50(4):416-23
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety, Separation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Automatic Data Processing
Child
Conduct Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study describes the development of the Brief Child and Family Phone Interview (BCFPI) - a computer-assisted telephone interview which adapts the revised Ontario Child Health Study's (OCHS-R) parent, teacher, and youth self-report scales for administration as intake screening and treatment outcome measures in children's mental health services. It focuses on the factor structure of the BCFPI's hypothesized parent-reported child mental health scales describing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), separation anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and major depression (MDD).
Data for the analysis come from an OCHS-R measurement study that included two groups of children and adolescents selected from the same urban area: a general population sample (n = 1,712) and a clinic-referred sample (n = 1,512); and a third sample that was enlisted in a province-wide implementation study of clinic-referred 6- to 18-year-olds (n = 56,825). We used confirmatory factor analysis to assess the factor structure of the BCFPI scales in different populations and to test measurement equivalence across selected groups.
Despite the strong constraints imposed on the measurement models, estimates of model fit across the three samples were comparable in magnitude and approached the cut-offs suggested for the GFI and CFI (>.9) and RMSEA (
PubMed ID
19017368 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.