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[Anticancer propaganda: myth or reality?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104400
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2014;60(1):96-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
E V Demin
V M Merabishvili
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2014;60(1):96-101
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Early Detection of Cancer - history - trends
Female
Health Education - history - trends
Health Promotion - history - trends
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
History, Ancient
Humans
Mass Screening - history - trends
Neoplasms - diagnosis - history - mortality - prevention & control - psychology - therapy
Persuasive Communication
Primary prevention - methods
Propaganda
Russia - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors raise a very important problem of anticancer propaganda aimed at the early detection of cancer to be solved nowadays by means of screening and constructive interaction between oncologists and the public. To increase the level of knowledge of the population in this area it is necessary to expand the range of its adequate awareness of tumor diseases. Only joint efforts can limit the destructive effect of cancer on people's minds, so that every person would be responsible for his own health, clearly understanding the advantages of early visit to a doctor. This once again highlights the need of educational work with the public, motivational nature of which allows strengthening the value of screening in the whole complex of measures to fight cancer.
PubMed ID
24772625 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening: a 35-year perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133501
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2011 Jul;33(1):165-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Suzanne W Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, 133 Brookline Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02215, USA. suzanne_fletcher@hms.harvard.edu
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2011 Jul;33(1):165-75
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - history
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - history
Canada
Diagnostic Errors - history
Female
Forecasting
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Mammography - history
Mass Screening - history - trends
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - history
Risk assessment
United States
United States Public Health Service - history
Abstract
Screening for breast cancer has been evaluated by 9 randomized trials over 5 decades and recommended by major guideline groups for more than 3 decades. Successes and lessons for cancer screening from this history include development of scientific methods to evaluate screening, by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force; the importance of randomized trials in the past, and the increasing need to develop new methods to evaluate cancer screening in the future; the challenge of assessing new technologies that are replacing originally evaluated screening tests; the need to measure false-positive screening test results and the difficulty in reducing their frequency; the unexpected emergence of overdiagnosis due to cancer screening; the difficulty in stratifying individuals according to breast cancer risk; women's fear of breast cancer and the public outrage over changing guidelines for breast cancer screening; the need for population scientists to better communicate with the public if evidence-based recommendations are to be heeded by clinicians, patients, and insurers; new developments in the primary prevention of cancers; and the interaction between improved treatment and screening, which, over time, and together with primary prevention, may decrease the need for cancer screening.
PubMed ID
21697257 View in PubMed
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