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5816 records – page 1 of 582.

[3 cases of viral carriage detected during screening for HIV antibodies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226768
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
E M Shelukhina
E V Chekunova
G R Matsevich
I A Okunev
S S Marennikova
M R Zak
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1991 Mar;(3):16-8
Date
Mar-1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Blood Donors
Carrier State - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
HIV Antibodies - blood
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - immunology
HIV-1 - immunology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Lithuania - epidemiology
Mass Screening - methods
Moscow - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
The results of screening more than 23,000 serum samples from persons belonging to risk groups, as well as those not belonging to such groups, in Moscow, Vilnius and Klaipeda are presented. Screening was carried out with the use of an assay system manufactured by the Scientific and Industrial Amalgamation "Antigen" (USSR). In this screening 3 HIV carriers were detected; of these, 2 were foreign students from two African countries.
PubMed ID
1872091 View in PubMed
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5-Alpha reductase inhibitor use and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275383
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2016
Author
Teemu J Murtola
Elina K Karppa
Kimmo Taari
Kirsi Talala
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 15;138(12):2820-8
Date
Jun-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Early Detection of Cancer
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Abstract
Randomized clinical trials have shown that use of 5a-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) lowers overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk compared to placebo, while the proportion of Gleason 8-10 tumors is elevated. It is unknown whether this affects PCa-specific survival. We studied disease-specific survival by 5-ARI usage in a cohort of 6,537 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial and linked to the national prescription database for information on medication use. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prostate cancer-specific deaths. For comparison, survival among alpha-blocker users was also evaluated. During the median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis a total of 2,478 men died; 617 due to prostate cancer and 1,861 due to other causes. The risk of prostate cancer death did not differ between 5-ARI users and nonusers (multivariable adjusted HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 and HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.69-1.41 for usage before and after the diagnosis, respectively). Alpha-blocker usage both before and after diagnosis was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.08-1.54 and HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30-1.86, respectively). The risk increase vanished in long-term alpha-blocker usage. Use of 5-ARIs does not appear to affect prostate cancer mortality when used in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased risk associated with alpha-blocker usage should prompt further exploration on the prognostic role of lower urinary tract symptoms.
PubMed ID
26804670 View in PubMed
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A 9-year follow-up study of participants and nonparticipants in sigmoidoscopy screening: importance of self-selection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93168
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Blom Johannes
Yin Li
Lidén Annika
Dolk Anders
Jeppsson Bengt
Påhlman Lars
Holmberg Lars
Nyrén Olof
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department for Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, K53, Huddinge, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. johannes.blom@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1163-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Sigmoidoscopy - utilization
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Self-selection may compromise cost-effectiveness of screening programs. We hypothesized that nonparticipants have generally higher morbidity and mortality than participants. METHODS: A Swedish population-based random sample of 1,986 subjects ages 59 to 61 years was invited to sigmoidoscopy screening and followed up for 9 years by means of multiple record linkages to health and population registers. Gender-adjusted cancer incidence rate ratio (IRR) and overall and disease group-specific and mortality rate ratio (MRR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated for nonparticipants relative to participants. Cancer and mortality rates were also estimated relative to the age-matched, gender-matched, and calendar period-matched Swedish population using standardized incidence ratios and standardized mortality ratios. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent participated. The incidence of colorectal cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), other gastrointestinal cancer (IRR, 2.7; 95% CI, 0.6-12.8), lung cancer (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-5.9), and smoking-related cancer overall (IRR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.5) tended to be increased among nonparticipants relative to participants. Standardized incidence ratios for most of the studied cancers tended to be >1.0 among nonparticipants and
PubMed ID
18483338 View in PubMed
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[10-year cytodiagnosis of cervical carcinoma: results and further developments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111744
Source
Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 1966 Aug;26(8):1135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1966

14 years of follow-up from the Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20979
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1999
Author
F E Alexander
T J Anderson
H K Brown
A P Forrest
W. Hepburn
A E Kirkpatrick
B B Muir
R J Prescott
A. Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK. freda.alexander@ed.ac.uk
Source
Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1903-8
Date
Jun-5-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control - radiography
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Research
Humans
Logistic Models
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scotland - epidemiology
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh randomised trial of breast-cancer screening recruited women aged 45-64 years from 1978 to 1981 (cohort 1), and those aged 45-49 years during 1982-85 (cohorts 2 and 3). Results based on 14 years of follow-up and 270,000 woman-years of observation are reported. METHODS: Breast-cancer mortality rates in the intervention group (28,628 women offered screening) were compared with those in the control group (26,026) with adjustment for socioeconomic status (SES) of general medical practices. Rate ratios were derived by means of logistic regression for the total trial population and for women first offered screening while younger than 50 years. Analyses were by intention to treat. FINDINGS: Initial unadjusted results showed a difference of just 13% in breast-cancer mortality rates between the intervention and control groups (156 deaths [5.18 per 10,000] vs 167 [6.04 per 10,000]; rate ratio 0.87 [95% CI 0.70-1.06]), but the results were influenced by differences in SES by trial group. After adjustment for SES, the rate ratio was 0.79 (95% CI 0.60-1.02). When deaths after diagnosis more than 3 years after the end of the study were censored the rate ratio became 0.71 (0.53-0.95). There was no evidence of heterogeneity by age at entry and no evidence that younger entrants had smaller or delayed benefit (rate ratio 0.70 [0.41-1.20]). No breast-cancer mortality benefit was observed for women whose breast cancers were diagnosed when they were younger than 50 years. Other-cause mortality rates did not differ by trial group when adjusted for SES. INTERPRETATION: Our findings confirm results from randomised trials in Sweden and the USA that screening for breast cancer lowers breast-cancer mortality. Similar results are reported by the UK geographical comparison, UK Trial of Early Detection of Breast Cancer. The results for younger women suggest benefit from introduction of screening before 50 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Jun 5;353(9168):1896-710371561
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946-710489974
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):946; author reply 94710489973
Comment In: Lancet. 1999 Sep 11;354(9182):947-810489975
Comment In: Lancet. 2001 Dec 22-29;358(9299):2165; author reply 2167-811784654
PubMed ID
10371567 View in PubMed
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15 years after Chernobyl: new evidence of thyroid cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19395
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-2001
Author
Y. Shibata
S. Yamashita
V B Masyakin
G D Panasyuk
S. Nagataki
Source
Lancet. 2001 Dec 8;358(9297):1965-6
Date
Dec-8-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Nuclear Reactors
Population Surveillance
Radioactive fallout
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident happened on April 26, 1986. We investigated the cause of the striking increase in frequency of thyroid cancer in children who lived within a 150 km radius of Chernobyl and who were born before and after the accident. No thyroid cancer was seen in 9472 children born in 1987-89, whereas one and 31 thyroid cancers were recorded in 2409 children born April 27, 1986, to Dec 31, 1986, and 9720 born Jan 1, 1983, to April 26, 1986, respectively. Short-lived radioactive fallout caused by the Chernobyl accident probably induced thyroid cancer in children living near Chernobyl.
PubMed ID
11747925 View in PubMed
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A 25-year follow-up of a population screened with faecal occult blood test in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161415
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nea Malila
Matti Hakama
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-001 70 Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Occult Blood
Patient compliance
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of and possible selection to attend in colorectal cancer screening.
During the years 1979-1980, 1 785 men and women (born in 1917-1929) were invited to a pilot screening project for colorectal cancer. The screening method used was a guaiac-based faecal occult blood test repeated once if the initial test was positive.
Compliance was 69% and the test was positive in 19% of those attending. In a record linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, 47 colorectal cancer cases and 24 deaths from colorectal cancer were observed by the end of 2004. In all, the particular test method was not regarded specific enough for population screening. There was, however, no difference in cancer incidence between those who complied and those who did not when compared to the general population of same age and gender.
Compliance was found high enough to make screening feasible and there was no self selection of persons with low cancer risk to attend screening.
PubMed ID
17851857 View in PubMed
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[40 years of the Oncological Service in Ul'ianovsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236114
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(9):70-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M A Storozhuk
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(9):70-3
Date
1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities - history - organization & administration
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Special - history
Humans
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Russia
Abstract
The paper discusses the development of oncological service in Ulyanovsk region since 1946 when a 35-bedded dispensary was opened. By 1984, its capacity had reached 335 beds.
PubMed ID
2958967 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
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5816 records – page 1 of 582.