Skip header and navigation

Refine By

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123566
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kurt Boman
Göran Hallmans
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
In the 1970s, men in northern Sweden had among the highest prevalences of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide. An intervention program combining population- and individual-oriented activities was initiated in 1985. Concurrently, collection of information on medical risk factors, lifestyle and anthropometry started. Today, these data make up one of the largest databases in the world on diet intake in a population-based sample, both in terms of sample size and follow-up period. The study examines trends in food and nutrient intake, serum cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) from 1986 to 2010 in northern Sweden.
Cross-sectional information on self-reported food and nutrient intake and measured body weight, height, and serum cholesterol were compiled for over 140,000 observations. Trends and trend breaks over the 25-year period were evaluated for energy-providing nutrients, foods contributing to fat intake, serum cholesterol and BMI.
Reported intake of fat exhibited two significant trend breaks in both sexes: a decrease between 1986 and 1992 and an increase from 2002 (women) or 2004 (men). A reverse trend was noted for carbohydrates, whereas protein intake remained unchanged during the 25-year period. Significant trend breaks in intake of foods contributing to total fat intake were seen. Reported intake of wine increased sharply for both sexes (more so for women) and export beer increased for men. BMI increased continuously for both sexes, whereas serum cholesterol levels decreased during 1986 - 2004, remained unchanged until 2007 and then began to rise. The increase in serum cholesterol coincided with the increase in fat intake, especially with intake of saturated fat and fats for spreading on bread and cooking.
Men and women in northern Sweden decreased their reported fat intake in the first 7 years (1986-1992) of an intervention program. After 2004 fat intake increased sharply for both genders, which coincided with introduction of a positive media support for low carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diet. The decrease and following increase in cholesterol levels occurred simultaneously with the time trends in food selection, whereas a constant increase in BMI remained unaltered. These changes in risk factors may have important effects on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-2414660243
Cites: J Intern Med. 2007 Apr;261(4):366-7417391111
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:31-714660245
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1985 Jun;14(2):285-924018996
Cites: Hum Nutr Clin Nutr. 1985;39 Suppl 1:5-414044297
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Dec;124(6):903-153776973
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Feb 15;19(3):335-5110649300
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 May;61(5):575-8117136037
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Feb 26;360(9):859-7319246357
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Apr 13;169(7):659-6919364995
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 May;30(9):1046-5619141562
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1477-8419144238
Cites: Eur Urol. 2009 Jan;55(1):249-5020050018
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):504-1819959603
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):932-820513263
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;64(8):905-1320502473
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Sep 7;153(5):289-9820820038
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-4420512657
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Oct;92(4):967-7420826627
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Dec;33(12):2684-9120693352
Cites: J Intern Med. 2011 Feb;269(2):219-3121158982
Cites: Environ Health. 2011;10:3321504558
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2012 Jun;125(6):382-821793808
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Feb 26;355(9205):675-8710703799
Cites: J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):579-8710809997
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Aug;4(4):919-2711527517
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;56:13-2011681559
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Jun;5(3):487-9612003662
Cites: Lancet. 2003 May 3;361(9368):1496-50112737858
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:9-1714660242
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1987;40(2):171-843617777
Cites: Prog Med Chem. 1988;25:291-3383076969
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Dec;22(6):1026-378144283
Cites: Stroke. 1994 Sep;25(9):1738-458073452
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Nov 19;344(8934):1383-97968073
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Oct 14;311(7011):986-97580640
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26 Suppl 1:S6-149126529
Cites: J Intern Med. 1998 Feb;243(2):99-1079566637
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Sep;16(3):171-69800231
Cites: Circulation. 1999 Feb 16;99(6):779-859989963
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(4):321-4; discussion 24316087495
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 8;366(9493):1267-7816214597
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Feb 13;166(3):285-9316476868
Cites: Gut. 2006 Oct;55(10):1461-616638790
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 9;355(19):1991-200217093250
Cites: J Intern Med. 2006 Dec;260(6):551-917116006
Cites: Nat Clin Pract Cardiovasc Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):34-4117180148
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:25-3014660244
PubMed ID
22686621 View in PubMed
Less detail

The case of the missing person: Alzheimer's disease in mass print magazines 1991-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169169
Source
Health Commun. 2006;19(3):269-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Juanne N Clarke
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. jclarke@wlu.ca
Source
Health Commun. 2006;19(3):269-76
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alzheimer Disease
Canada
Caregivers
Health Education - trends
Humans
Mass Media - trends
Periodicals as Topic - trends
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease is growing in incidence and prevalence in the developed world. Rates have been increasing as populations have been aging. There are still many unknowns regarding prevention, causes, and treatments. The purpose of this article is to analyze the portrayal of Alzheimer's in the highest-circulation mass print English-language magazines published in the United States and Canada over a period of a decade, specifically those for 1991, 1996, and 2001. This research investigates the portrayal of persons with Alzheimer's, the disease itself, caregivers and experts, and the dominant frames or discourses within which Alzheimer's is described. Twenty-five articles from the highest-circulation mass print magazines available in Canada were studied through qualitative and inductive research of both manifest and latent content. One of the most notable findings is the absence of the person with the disease as a person with a voice, with needs and desires. When the disease itself is described it is characterized as fearsome, relentless, and aggressive. Both the unquestioned duty of the individual caregiver and his or her (usually the caregiver is a woman) suffering are emphasized. The disease, its diagnosis, and potential treatments are framed almost exclusively within a medical rather than a political-economy or lifestyle frame. Minimal attention is paid to prevention, early stages of the disease, social support, options for care, or other alternative understandings of issues related to Alzheimer's. The theoretical and practical significance of these findings is considered.
PubMed ID
16719730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diabetes portrayals in North American print media: a qualitative and quantitative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173119
Source
Am J Public Health. 2005 Oct;95(10):1832-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Melanie Rock
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Health Sciences Centre, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. mrock@ucalgary.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2005 Oct;95(10):1832-8
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Bibliometrics
Canada
Causality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Health education
Heart Diseases - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Mass Media - trends
Newspapers - trends
Obesity - complications
Periodicals as Topic - trends
Primary Prevention
Prospective Studies
Public Health
Public Opinion
Qualitative Research
Social Problems
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This study investigated how media coverage has portrayed diabetes as newsworthy.
The quantitative component involved tabulating diabetes coverage in 2 major Canadian newspapers, 1988-2001 and 1991-2001. The qualitative component focused on high-profile coverage in 2 major US magazines and 2 major Canadian newspapers, 1998-2000.
Although coverage did not consistently increase, the quantitative results suggest an emphasis on linking diabetes with heart disease and mortality to convey its seriousness. The qualitative component identified 3 main ways of portraying type 2 diabetes: as an insidious problem, as a problem associated with particular populations, and as a medical problem.
Overall, the results suggest that when communicating with journalists, researchers and advocates have stressed that diabetes maims and kills. Yet even when media coverage acknowledged societal forces and circumstances as causes, the proposed remedies did not always include or stress modifications to social contexts. Neither the societal causes of public health problems nor possible societal remedies automatically received attention from researchers or from journalists. Skilled advocacy is needed to put societal causes and solutions on public agendas.
Notes
Cites: Semin Arthritis Rheum. 1999 Apr;28(5):333-4110342391
Cites: CMAJ. 1998;159 Suppl 8:S1-299834731
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1997 Dec;20(12):1859-629405907
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 May;87(5):842-59184517
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1995 May 1;75(14):894-9037732997
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Sep 30;329(14):977-868366922
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1993 Apr;16(4):642-528462395
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1992 Feb;46(1):63-51573362
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 1991;14 Suppl 2:S3-81794263
Cites: Milbank Q. 1989;67 Suppl 1:1-152682167
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2004;25:419-3715015928
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Nov;57(10):1783-9514499505
Cites: Med Anthropol. 2003 Apr-Jun;22(2):131-7412745637
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Jul 13;325(7355):81-412114239
Cites: J Health Commun. 2001 Jul-Sep;6(3):235-4711550591
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Jun;24(6):1038-4311375367
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Feb;91(2):288-9111211641
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2000 Sep;41(3):347-6711011509
Cites: Prev Med. 1999 Dec;29(6 Pt 2):S50-810641818
PubMed ID
16131643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Farm-related injury event, social consequences and injury reporting in the Land Lantbruk newspaper in Sweden: a retrospective study of farm-related injury reporting during 2000-2005.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79702
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2006 Dec;14(6):249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Lundälv Jörgen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Work, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2006 Dec;14(6):249-52
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Occupational - economics - prevention & control - trends
Agriculture - trends
Cost of Illness
Direct Service Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Journalism, Medical
Mass Media - trends
Newspapers - trends
Population Surveillance
Qualitative Research
Research Design - trends
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health
Safety Management
Social Responsibility
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to detect how a leading news paper, the Land Lantbruk in Stockholm, Sweden, informs the public and specifically the rural sector in Sweden and the Scandinavian countries concerning injury events (farm-related injury event) and the use of injury prevention and control. Injury reporting in the Land Lantbruk has been studied from the point of injury prevention and control. A study of injury prevention and rural health and safety in Australia shows that the newspaper The Land that serves Australia's rural community should 'be an under-utilised vehicle for news and commentary on rural health and safety issues'. DESIGN: The study period was from January 2000 to February 2005. A total of 178 articles were reviewed and analysed. The articles were available on a newspaper database in the Land Lantbruk newspaper. Articles that addressed farm-related injury event and rural health and safety were chosen and organised into subgroups. RESULTS: Tractor and motor vehicle safety (35%) was most common among the injury reporting. Although the newspaper Land Lantbruk provided excellent coverage of the causes of these events, the reports tended to focus on circumstances and did not provide information on injury prevention or the advantages of also coverage of the social and psychosocial long-term consequences of accidents. CONCLUSION: In the prevention work of reducing farm-related injuries in the rural sector in the Scandinavian countries and decreasing the human suffering represented by this health problem, rural politicians, insurance companies, rural authorities and also handicap organisations should listen more to the injured individuals and their own experiences relative to the difficulty of life after an accident. The reaction of family and relatives, and experiences of the long-term social consequences, have not been included in the media coverage. Journalists at the Land Lantbruk could also share experiences of the Swedish coverage of rural health and safety from Australian journalists from The Land.
Notes
Comment In: Aust J Rural Health. 2006 Dec;14(6):24317121501
PubMed ID
17121503 View in PubMed
Less detail

Public place restrictions on smoking in Canada: assessing the role of the state, media, science and public health advocacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183173
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jan;58(1):13-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Mark Asbridge
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, 725 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2J4. asbridge@chass.utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2004 Jan;58(1):13-24
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Advocacy
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mass Media - trends
Persuasive Communication
Proportional Hazards Models
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Publications
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Social Control Policies - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
While much is known about the impact of law and public policy, we know considerably less about their antecedents. Theories of policy adoption suggest that a variety of policy inputs help to shape legislative change. This research considers the enactment of municipal smoking bylaws in Canada between 1970 and 1995. The emergence of second-hand smoke (SHS) has been offered as a viable explanation for the increased enactment of local smoking restrictions. A number of indicators confirm the rising public health concern around SHS. Using Health Canada data on municipal smoking bylaw enactment in Canada, this paper employs an event history analysis to trace the role of four indicators of the increased recognition of SHS as a public health concern-scientific research, parliamentary debate, print media, and health advocacy. Findings indicate that the print media and health advocacy play the strongest role in explaining the increase in the adoption of municipal smoking bylaws in Canada. Results lend support to the quantitative study of the policy adoption process and to theories of policy making that consider multiple influences on policy adoption.
PubMed ID
14572918 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reaching suicidal people with media campaigns: new challenges for a new century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165668
Source
Crisis. 2006;27(4):172-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Marc Daigle
Louise Beausoleil
Jacques Brisoux
Sylvaine Raymond
Lucie Charbonneau
Julie Desaulniers
Author Affiliation
University of Québec at Trois-Rivières, Canada. marc.daigle@uqtr.ca
Source
Crisis. 2006;27(4):172-80
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Five variables were investigated in the evaluation of Suicide Prevention Weeks (SPW) held in 1999, 2000, and 2001 in Québec, Canada: exposure to the campaign, previous suicide ideation, knowledge, attitudes, and intentions. After the year 2000 campaign, a telephone survey conducted on a representative sample of 1020 men revealed that only those actually exposed to the SPW had gained more knowledge of suicide facts and resources. However, the SPW did not influence attitudes or intentions to seek help. Results are not surprising, considering the low intensity of the campaign, especially in the media. Campaigns aimed at changing suicidal behaviors must be intensive.
PubMed ID
17219749 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.