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145 records – page 1 of 15.

Accounting for depressive symptoms in women: a twin study of associations with interpersonal relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45767
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2004
Author
Erica L Spotts
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Jody Ganiban
David Reiss
Paul Lichtenstein
Kjell Hansson
Marianne Cederblad
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, S-171-77 Stockholm, Sweden. Erica.Spotts@mep.ki.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Date
Oct-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study examined how interpersonal relationships, specifically marital quality and adequacy of social support, are associated with depressive symptoms among women. METHODS: A sample of 326 female monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and their spouses was drawn from the Swedish Twin Registry. Associations among the three variables were evaluated by comparing similarities among monozygotic and dizygotic female twin pairs. RESULTS: Interpersonal relationships contributed between 18% and 31% of the variance for depressive symptoms in women. Associations among the three variables were accounted for by genetic influences when women's reports were used. Non-shared environmental influences were important for the association between marital quality and depressive symptoms when a combination of husband and wife reports of marital quality were used. LIMITATIONS: The data is cross-sectional and the generalizability of these findings to depressive symptoms in men or to individuals with major depression is not clear. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate important associations among marital quality, social support and depressive symptoms in women, which should be taken into consideration for prevention and intervention strategies targeting depression.
PubMed ID
15465582 View in PubMed
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[[Aging of the population and social policy: lessons from Sweden].]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73181
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
N. Maruo
Source
Jinkogaku Kenkyu. 1994 May;(17):5-14
Date
May-1994
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Birth rate
Demography
Developed Countries
Economics
Employment
English Abstract
Europe
Fertility
Financial Management
Financing, Government
Health Manpower
Income
Marriage
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Scandinavia
Social Security
Sweden
Abstract
"In this paper I tried to show how the ageing of the population influences the change in the growth of employment, employment structure, the savings ratio, economic growth and the cost of social security [in Sweden]. In the latter part of the paper I suggested a close correlation between the average marriage age of women, the total fertility rate and the work participation ratio of women." (SUMMARY IN ENG)
PubMed ID
12319307 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and crime. A comparative study of three groups of alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251813
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1975 Nov;36(11):1452-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975

Alcohol problems among male disability pensioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13239
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(3):145-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
A. Medhus
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1976;4(3):145-9
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcoholic Intoxication
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Disabled Persons
Humans
Male
Marriage
Retirement
Social Class
Social Control, Formal
Sweden
Abstract
The study covers two materials from Malmö: 1. All 235 men who were granted temporary or permanent disability pension for the first time in 1964. 2. A group of 235 men randomly chosen from the 893 men who were granted temporary or permanent disability pension for the first time in 1974. In both materials, the number of convictions for drunkenness during the period 1932-74 was about 4.5 times as high as for Swedish men of the same age. One pensioner in three had been convicted. During the period 1939-74, one pensioner in ten in each material had been subjected to compulsory treatment by Temperance Boards.
PubMed ID
136744 View in PubMed
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Assaultive alcoholics 20 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12747
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1985 Feb;71(2):141-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
M. Berglund
K. Tunving
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1985 Feb;71(2):141-7
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Crime
Employment
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Personality Disorders - psychology
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Suicide - psychology
Sweden
Violence
Abstract
In a consecutive series of 257 alcoholics from an out-patient department 53 were judged as assaultive and 38 as suicidally inclined at the clinical examination 20 years ago. At the follow-up the assaultive alcoholics had a 3.3 times increased mortality rate, the suicidally inclined 1.9 times and the others 1.7 times compared with the general population. The assaultive alcoholics had an increased rate of suicides, intoxications and other alcohol-related deaths compared with other alcoholics. Repeated assaultive behaviour was uncommon. It is concluded that a skilled psychiatric evaluation of assaultive behaviour in alcoholism has an important predictive value.
PubMed ID
3976408 View in PubMed
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Associations between strain in domestic work and self-rated health: a study of employed women in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87022
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):21-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Staland-Nyman Carin
Alexanderson Kristina
Hensing Gunnel
Author Affiliation
Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden. carin.nyman@socmed.gu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):21-7
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Conflict
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Housekeeping
Humans
Marriage
Mental health
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological
Sweden
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Workload
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between strain in domestic work and self-rated health among employed women in Sweden, using two different methods of measuring strain in domestic work. METHODS: Questionnaire data were collected on health and living conditions in paid and unpaid work for employed women (n=1,417), aged 17-64 years. "Domestic job strain'' was an application of the demand-control model developed by Karasek and Theorell, and "Domestic work equity and marital satisfaction'' was measured by questions on the division of and responsibility for domestic work and relationship with spouse/cohabiter. Self-rated health was measured using the SF-36 Health Survey. Associations were analysed by bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses, and reported as standardized regression coefficients. RESULTS: Higher strain in domestic work was associated with lower self-rated health, also after controlling for potential confounders and according to both strain measures. "Domestic work equity and marital satisfaction'' showed for example negative associations with mental health beta -0.211 (p
PubMed ID
18426781 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward same-sex marriage: the case of Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107987
Source
J Homosex. 2013;60(9):1349-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Niklas Jakobsson
Andreas Kotsadam
Siri Støre Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Social Research (NOVA), Oslo, Norway. nja@nova.no
Source
J Homosex. 2013;60(9):1349-60
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Norway
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the variables that explain attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Using recently collected Scandinavian data (from Norway and Sweden) with a high response rate, this study shows that gender, regular participation in religious activities, political ideology, education, whether the respondent lived in the capital city, and attitudes toward gender equality were important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Age and income were not important for attitudes toward same-sex marriage. Although both Norwegians and Swedes clearly favor same-sex marriage, Swedes are significantly more positive than Norwegians.
PubMed ID
23952927 View in PubMed
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145 records – page 1 of 15.