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Cause-specific mortality by marital status and social class in Finland during 1969--1971.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246676
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Psychol Med Sociol. 1979 Nov;13A(6):691-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979

Incidence and prognosis of ischaemic heart disease with respect to marital status and social class. A national record linkage study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244200
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1981 Sep;35(3):192-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
M. Koskenvuo
J. Kaprio
M. Romo
H. Langinvainio
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1981 Sep;35(3):192-6
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Finland
Humans
Male
Marriage
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Social Class
Abstract
Increased mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has been found in previous studies among divorced, widowed, and unskilled middle-aged Finnish men. In this study all cases of IHD in men aged 40-64 during 1972 were analysed by linking death certificates and hospital records (7499 cases with 3136 deaths). Age-adjusted incidence, mortality, and survival rates of the first and third year were calculated by marital status and social class. The highest mortality rate was found among unskilled workers, the highest incidence among widowers and those in the lower professional classes, and the lowest survival rate among divorcees, single persons, and unskilled workers. The ratio of mortality by marital status (1.77) was in part due to survival (ratio 1.44) and in part due to incidence (ratio 1.32). The ratio of mortality by social class (1.44) seemed to be due more to differences in incidence (ratio 1.36) than to differences in survival (ratio 1.18). The distribution of conventional risk factors of IHD by marital status and social class seems to explain only part of the mortality differences.
Notes
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1973 Feb;27(1):41-34717799
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1974 Feb;133(2):221-84812746
Cites: Lancet. 1975 Feb 22;1(7904):415-2048609
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1976 Apr 29;294(18):987-94768766
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1977 Jan;11(1):35-41887956
Cites: Adv Cardiol. 1978;(22):110-2922992
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1977 Dec;31(4):231-7597676
Cites: Annu Rev Med. 1978;29:543-62348045
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1978 Jul 13;299(2):60-5661862
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1978 May;107(5):384-402665655
Cites: Adv Cardiol. 1978;25:47-60707205
Cites: Br Med J. 1978 Oct 21;2(6145):1109-12709255
Cites: Prog Clin Biol Res. 1978;24 Pt B:179-84569306
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1980;33(1):1-46153181
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1980;33(2):95-1067354102
Cites: Soc Sci Med Med Psychol Med Sociol. 1979 Nov;13A(6):691-7538482
Cites: Br Heart J. 1980 Feb;43(2):176-837362710
Cites: Soc Sci Med Med Psychol Med Sociol. 1980 May;14A(3):191-2017384820
Cites: Soc Sci Med Med Psychol Med Sociol. 1980 Mar;14A(2):119-267209610
PubMed ID
7328378 View in PubMed
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Interpersonal conflict as a predictor of work disability: a follow-up study of 15,348 Finnish employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212724
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1996 Feb;40(2):157-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
K. Appelberg
K. Romanov
K. Heikkilá
M L Honkasalo
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1996 Feb;40(2):157-67
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Conflict (Psychology)
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Gender Identity
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Marriage - psychology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Inventory
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Workplace
Abstract
This 6-year follow-up study investigates the impact of interpersonal conflict at work on work disability among 8,021 male and 7,327 female employees aged 24 to 65 years at baseline. Marital status, marital conflict, monotonous work, hectic work pace, hostility, neuroticism, life dissatisfaction, and experienced stress of daily activities were included in survival analyses, which were adjusted for age, social status, and general health status. Interpersonal conflict at work predicted work disability only among women (RR 1.56, CL 1.01-2.39). This risk was confined to women who reported simultaneous marital conflicts (RR 2.54, CL 1.03-6.22). When included in further analyses, life dissatisfaction was a significant risk factor among both genders, but monotonous work, neuroticism, and experienced stress of daily activities were risk factors only among men. These data suggest that interpersonal conflict could be a determinant of work disability, and this indicates the importance of gender and marital factors.
PubMed ID
8778398 View in PubMed
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Mortality by marital status and social class in Finland during 1969--1971. Mortality from natural and violent causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249003
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1978;6(3):137-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
M. Koskenvuo
S. Sarna
J. Kaprio
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1978;6(3):137-43
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Mortality
Sex Factors
Social Class
Abstract
In this paper a study of the distribution of mortality rates by social class and marital status for men and women in three age groups (25--44, 45--64 and 65--84) is presented. Natural and violent causes of death are analysed separately. The death certificates of Finnish citizens for the years 1969, 1970 and 1971 (totalling 137780) were analysed and mortality rates standarized using as reference population the data from the 1970 census. It is shown that certain combinations of social class and marital status can be considered as significant risk factors for mortality in the Finnish population.
PubMed ID
725556 View in PubMed
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Social factors and the gender difference in mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237648
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;23(6):605-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M. Koskenvuo
J. Kaprio
J. Lönnqvist
S. Sarna
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1986;23(6):605-9
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Mortality
Sex Characteristics
Social Class
Abstract
The effect of social factors on the male/female difference in mortality in Finland was studied by comparing age-adjusted mortality of males and females by social class and marital status. 44,548 death certificates (years 1969-1971) and 1970 census data for 25-64-years olds were analysed. The gender difference was 2.8-fold: 5.3-fold for violent causes and 2.3-fold for natural causes. The greatest gender difference from violent causes was found in accidental poisonings (18.7-fold) and drownings (12.8-fold), and from natural causes in mental disorders (mainly alcoholism; 5.7-fold) and in ischemic heart disease (4.5-fold). The gender difference was most prominent in unskilled workers, divorced and widowed and less prominent in married and upper professionals. The great variation of gender difference of mortality by social class and marital status seems to indicate that mortality difference between males and females is associated to external factors rather than biological differences between men and women. This conclusion is also supported by the progressive increase of gender difference of mortality from 1.4 to 2.8 during the last 80 years in working-aged Finns.
PubMed ID
3764510 View in PubMed
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The use of tranquilizers, hypnotics and analgesics among 18,592 Finnish adults: associations with recent interpersonal conflicts at work or with a spouse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219965
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1993 Nov;46(11):1315-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1993
Author
K. Appelberg
K. Romanov
M L Honkasalo
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1993 Nov;46(11):1315-22
Date
Nov-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Analysis of Variance
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage - psychology
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - drug therapy - etiology
Tranquilizing Agents - therapeutic use
Unemployment - psychology
Abstract
The use of tranquilizers, hypnotics, and analgesics was assessed by a postal questionnaire in a nationwide sample of 18,592 adults aged from 24 to 65 years: 14,800 employees, 2105 housewives and 687 unemployed persons. The use of tranquilizers was most frequent among unemployed persons whereas housewives did not use the studied medicines more than the employed women. In the multivariate analyses (adjusted for age, social class and neuroticism) unmarried status was associated with the use of tranquilizers and hypnotics among both genders. Reported recent interpersonal conflicts both at work and with a spouse were associated with the use of tranquilizers among men, whereas among women significant associations were found only for conflicts with a spouse. These results indicate that domestic factors are more likely to predict women's tranquilizer use.
PubMed ID
8229109 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.