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A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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14-year outcome in early schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248211
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1978 Oct;58(4):327-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1978
Author
R C Bland
H. Orn
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1978 Oct;58(4):327-38
Date
Oct-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Female
Fertility
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Marriage
Prognosis
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Of 45 first admission schizophrenics from 1963, an incidence by first admission group for northern Alberta, 43 were followed-up 14 years later. Based on these figures the expectancy was found to be 0.49%. The proportion of patients who were married was less than expected in comparison with the general population, but amongst the married, fertility was probably comparable to the population's. At follow-up about half the patients were managing well with little or no disability, one quarter had moderate to marked disability and the remainder were socially, psychiatrically and occupationally disabled. From the time of first admission, patients had spent an average of 15% of their time in hospital and lost 28% of the total time due to psychiatric disability.
PubMed ID
717003 View in PubMed
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A 30-year follow-up study of a child psychiatric clientele. I. Demographic description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68611
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
F W Larsen
V. Dahl
E. Hallum
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1990 Jan;81(1):39-45
Date
Jan-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Psychiatry
Crime
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marriage
Mental Disorders - mortality - psychology
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Adjustment
Social Class
Abstract
A register investigation was carried out as of December 31, 1980, with the aim of giving a broad description of a child psychiatric clientele 30 years after admission to hospital. The material consists of 322 patients--189 boys (59%) and 133 girls (41%)--who were admitted during the period 1949-1951 to the only 2 child psychiatric departments at that time in Denmark. We succeeded in identifying 93% of the patients. The mean age at the time of analysis was 38.6 years (range 32-46). The material was compared with the age-related Danish population by marital status, vocational education, and socioeconomic class. A total of 115 patients (36%) had been admitted to an adult psychiatric department, and 50 patients only once. A total of 95 patients (30%) had committed criminal offences and 12 had only committed traffic offences. A total of 60 patients (19%) had obtained disability pensions. During the 30-year follow-up period, 19 patients (6%) had died. A statistically significant extra mortality was found only for women. Four patients had committed suicide. By logistic regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation was found between criminal record and admission to psychiatric department and the variables: divorce, no vocational education, and lowest socioeconomic class. About 54% had managed well, judging by the variables employed.
PubMed ID
2330827 View in PubMed
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1986 and beyond. A look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236215
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
C. Stavrakaki
B. Vargo
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Criminal Law
Financing, Government
Human Rights
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Marriage
Social Justice
Sterilization
United States
Abstract
Recent research in the field of mental retardation has pointed to a better-defined population with exacting prevalence of the basic pathology and related disabilities. Advances in the areas of prevention and treatment have further reduced the prevalence and incidence of mental retardation. Current legislation and legislative procedures have led to a more equitable and fairer application of human rights to all citizens. However, discrepancies and ambiguities still remain with respect to interpretation of the spirit of the law as related to the retarded. Financial restraints and serious economic hardship have impacted on social and political attitudes and created two-tier systems of the rich and poor with the retarded referred to as "surplus population." This situation has, in turn, influenced the availability of resources, manpower, training, and research in this field. The future could be brighter if sociologic and philosophic changes parallel technologic advances. It is our duty and commitment to continue and further the developments in all spheres relevant to the retarded in order to maximize human potential whenever possible.
PubMed ID
3809000 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Canada: religious and ideological dimensions of women's attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227544
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
V. Krishnan
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Marriage
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
This paper examines a number of demographic and sociocultural factors (e.g., age, marital status, family size, religion, religious assiduity, sex-role ideology) as predictors of women's attitudes toward abortion, using data from the Canadian Fertility Survey of 1984. The findings suggest that women's abortion attitudes are to a greater extent based on ideological positions. It appears that anti-abortion stance affects those women who are religious, presumably by increasing the relationship between their general sex-role ideological stances and abortion attitudes. Abortion attitudes also vary according to a woman's education, her size, and province/region of residence.
PubMed ID
1801205 View in PubMed
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[Abuse in marriages and living-together relationships]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11724
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 May 30;113(14):1695-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1993
Author
E K Bovim
I. Saltvedt
I. Lereim
Author Affiliation
Skade-akuttavdelingen, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 May 30;113(14):1695-7
Date
May-30-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Spouse Abuse - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The authors have studied the type and frequency of cases of wife-battering attending an emergency outpatient clinic in Trondheim, Norway. Most patients were between 20 and 30 years old. They had multiple traumas, with a predominance of traumas near the head and neck region. Almost half (44%) of the abusers were unemployed, and most of them were 30-40 years old. Alcohol was reported as an important precipitating factor by 75% of the victims. Comparison with a corresponding study carried out ten years ago shows that the frequency of wife-battering seems to be almost unchanged.
PubMed ID
8322293 View in PubMed
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Abuse of and dependence on alcohol in Swedish women: role of education, occupation and family structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10814
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
K L Thundal
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden. Kajsa-Lena.Thundal@socmed.gu.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Demography
Divorce
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Marriage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study, which is part of a multipurpose study on alcohol use among women, focuses on the association between education, occupation, family structure and development of alcohol dependence or abuse in women. A total of 316 women were selected by stratified random sampling from all women in a defined part of Gothenburg, Sweden. In a face to face interview, questions were asked about occupation, education, family structure and other variables reflecting socioeconomic conditions and relations within the family. As outcome measures we used alcohol dependence and abuse (ADA), diagnosed in a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R). We found that never having been married, or having poor communication with the spouse, as well as having no children at home to take care of, were strongly associated with ADA in women. The role of social class depended on whether education or occupation was used as a measure. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that development of alcohol-related problems among women to a large extent is influenced by matters that relate to home and private life.
PubMed ID
9766171 View in PubMed
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Accounting for depressive symptoms in women: a twin study of associations with interpersonal relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45767
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2004
Author
Erica L Spotts
Jenae M Neiderhiser
Jody Ganiban
David Reiss
Paul Lichtenstein
Kjell Hansson
Marianne Cederblad
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, S-171-77 Stockholm, Sweden. Erica.Spotts@mep.ki.se
Source
J Affect Disord. 2004 Oct 1;82(1):101-11
Date
Oct-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study examined how interpersonal relationships, specifically marital quality and adequacy of social support, are associated with depressive symptoms among women. METHODS: A sample of 326 female monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and their spouses was drawn from the Swedish Twin Registry. Associations among the three variables were evaluated by comparing similarities among monozygotic and dizygotic female twin pairs. RESULTS: Interpersonal relationships contributed between 18% and 31% of the variance for depressive symptoms in women. Associations among the three variables were accounted for by genetic influences when women's reports were used. Non-shared environmental influences were important for the association between marital quality and depressive symptoms when a combination of husband and wife reports of marital quality were used. LIMITATIONS: The data is cross-sectional and the generalizability of these findings to depressive symptoms in men or to individuals with major depression is not clear. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate important associations among marital quality, social support and depressive symptoms in women, which should be taken into consideration for prevention and intervention strategies targeting depression.
PubMed ID
15465582 View in PubMed
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Act No. 223, amending the Marriage and Divorce Act, 22 April 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38577
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Source
Annu Rev Popul Law. 1988;15:72
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Crime
Denmark
Developed Countries
Divorce
Domestic Violence
Europe
Legislation
Marriage
Scandinavia
Social Problems
Abstract
This Law amends the Marriage and Divorce Act of Denmark to provide that a spouse has the right to obtain a divorce when the other spouse deliberately has committed serious violence toward the first spouse or the children.
PubMed ID
12289667 View in PubMed
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820 records – page 1 of 82.