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25-year trends and socio-demographic differences in response rates: Finnish adult health behaviour survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168616
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hanna Tolonen
Satu Helakorpi
Kirsi Talala
Ville Helasoja
Tuija Martelin
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. hanna.tolonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Education - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
When estimating population level changes in health indicators, the declining response rate, especially if also the characteristics of non-respondents are changing may bias the outcome. There is evidence that survey response rates are declining in many countries. It is also known that respondents and non-respondents differ in their socio-economic and demographic status as well as in their health and health behaviours. There is no information about the changes in the differences between respondents and non-respondents over time. Our purpose was to investigate the changes over time in the differences between respondents and non-respondents in respect to their sex, age, marital status and educational level. The data from the Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey (1978-2002) was used. The response rate declined over the past 25 years for both men and women in all age groups. The decline was faster among men than women, and also faster in younger age groups than older age groups. There is a marked difference in the response rate between married and non-married persons but it did not change over time. Also the response rate between different educational levels differed for both men and women, and this difference increased over the years. The declining response rate and at the same time occurring change in the non-respondent characteristics will decrease the representativeness of the results, limit the comparability of the results with other surveys, increase the bias of the trend estimates and limit the comparability of the results between population groups.
PubMed ID
16804763 View in PubMed
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Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: influence of social factors in determining length of hospital stay and readmission rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154563
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Alyson W M Wong
Wen Q Gan
Jane Burns
Don D Sin
Sephan F van Eeden
Author Affiliation
The James iCAPTURE Centre for Cardiovascular and pulmonary Research, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, Providence Healthcare, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is the leading reason for hospitalization in Canada and a significant financial burden on hospital resources. Identifying factors that influence the time a patient spends in the hospital and readmission rates will allow for better use of scarce hospital resources.
To determine the factors that influence length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and readmission for patients with AECOPD in an inner-city hospital.
Using the Providence Health Records, a retrospective review of patients admitted to St Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) during the winter of 2006 to 2007 (six months) with a diagnosis of AECOPD, was conducted. Exacerbations were classified according to Anthonisen criteria to determine the severity of exacerbation on admission. Severity of COPD was scored using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. For comparative analysis, severity of disease (GOLD criteria), age, sex and smoking history were matched.
Of 109 admissions reviewed, 66 were single admissions (61%) and 43 were readmissions (39%). The number of readmissions ranged from two to nine (mean of 3.3 readmissions). More than 85% of admissions had the severity of COPD equal to or greater than GOLD stage 3. The significant indicators for readmission were GOLD status (P
Notes
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Comment In: Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):343-419069593
PubMed ID
18949105 View in PubMed
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Admixture analysis of age at onset in schizophrenia: evidence of three subgroups in a first-episode sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107635
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2013 Nov-Dec;35(6):664-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jerome J Liu
Ross M G Norman
Raul Manchanda
Vincenzo De Luca
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2013 Nov-Dec;35(6):664-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Canada
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to assess the presence of different subgroups, via age-at-onset (AAO) analysis, in a schizophrenia population consecutively recruited through an Early Psychosis Service in London, Canada.
Admixture analysis was applied in order to identify a model of separate normal distribution of AAO characterized by different means, variances and population proportions to allow for evaluation of different subgroups in a sample of 187 unrelated patients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of schizophrenia.
The best-fitting model suggested three subgroups with means and standard deviations of 16.8 ± 1.9, 22.3 ± 2.1 and 32.7 ± 5.9 years comprising 41%, 30% and 29% of the schizophrenia sample, respectively. These three subgroups were categorized as early, intermediate and late onset with cutoffs determined by admixture analysis to be 19 and 26 years of age, respectively. In our investigation, the definition of early-onset schizophrenia is the main outcome. We considered the clinical variables mainly related to the heritability and neurobiology of schizophrenia. Single status was strongly associated with early onset (P
PubMed ID
23988234 View in PubMed
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Age, marital status and changes in dietary habits in later life: a 21-year follow-up among Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125595
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Irja Haapala
Ritva Prättälä
Kristiina Patja
Reija Männikkö
Maija Hassinen
Pirjo Komulainen
Rainer Rauramaa
Author Affiliation
School of Applied Educational Sciences and Teacher Education and Department of Clinical Nutrition and Public Health, University of Eastern Finland, Savonlinna, Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1174-81
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Diet
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To examine 21-year longitudinal changes in dietary habits and their associations with age and marital status among women aged 50-60 years at baseline.
Prospective, longitudinal study of a cohort in the FINMONICA population-based risk factor survey with clinical assessments in 1982, 1992 and 2003. Dietary habits were assessed via self-reported consumption of foods typically contributing to SFA, cholesterol and sugar intakes in the Finnish diet. A dietary risk score based upon five items was used.
Kuopio region, Finland.
Complete data from all three assessments for 103 women of the original cohort of 299 were included for two age groups: 50-54 and 55-60 years at baseline.
Dietary habits improved between 1982 and 1992 and showed continued but less pronounced improvement between 1992 and 2003: within the younger age group, 78 % of the women reduced the number of dietary risk points from the 1982 to 2003 scores, whereas 3 % increased them and 19 % reported no change. In the older age group these percentages were 61 %, 23 % and 16 %, respectively. Women who remained married showed a steadier decline in dietary risk points than single women or women who were widows at the beginning of the follow-up.
Older women make positive changes to their dietary habits but the consistency of these changes may be affected by the ageing process, marital status and changes in the latter.
PubMed ID
22469058 View in PubMed
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Association between mid-life marital status and cognitive function in later life: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149912
Source
BMJ. 2009;339:b2462
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Krister HÃ¥kansson
Suvi Rovio
Eeva-Liisa Helkala
Anna-Riitta Vilska
Bengt Winblad
Hilkka Soininen
Aulikki Nissinen
Abdul H Mohammed
Miia Kivipelto
Author Affiliation
School of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Växjö University, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2009;339:b2462
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - blood - epidemiology - psychology
Apolipoprotein E4 - metabolism
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether mid-life marital status is related to cognitive function in later life.
Prospective population based study with an average follow-up of 21 years.
Kuopio and Joensuu regions in eastern Finland.
Participants were derived from random, population based samples previously investigated in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987; 1449 individuals (73%), aged 65-79, underwent re-examination in 1998.
Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.
People cohabiting with a partner in mid-life (mean age 50.4) were less likely than all other categories (single, separated, or widowed) to show cognitive impairment later in life at ages 65-79. Those widowed or divorced in mid-life and still so at follow-up had three times the risk compared with married or cohabiting people. Those widowed both at mid-life and later life had an odds ratio of 7.67 (1.6 to 40.0) for Alzheimer's disease compared with married or cohabiting people. The highest increased risk for Alzheimer's disease was in carriers of the apolipoprotein E e4 allele who lost their partner before mid-life and were still widowed or divorced at follow-up. The progressive entering of several adjustment variables from mid-life did not alter these associations.
Living in a relationship with a partner might imply cognitive and social challenges that have a protective effect against cognitive impairment later in life, consistent with the brain reserve hypothesis. The specific increased risk for widowed and divorced people compared with single people indicates that other factors are needed to explain parts of the results. A sociogenetic disease model might explain the dramatic increase in risk of Alzheimer's disease for widowed apolipoprotein E e4 carriers.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2009;339:b169019574311
PubMed ID
19574312 View in PubMed
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Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279029
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Clara Aarts
Carin Tillman
Hanna Persson
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
John Öhrvik
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Object Attachment
Prenatal Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents' marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers' and fathers' EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.
PubMed ID
25854998 View in PubMed
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Autoerotic deaths: a 25-year retrospective epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135697
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2012 Jun;33(2):143-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anny Sauvageau
Author Affiliation
Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. anny.sauvageau@gmail.com
Source
Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 2012 Jun;33(2):143-6
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Asphyxia - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - blood
Ethanol - blood
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Narcotics - blood
Neck Injuries - mortality
Paraphilias - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
It is written in almost all articles on autoerotic deaths that these fatalities account for about 500 to 1000 deaths per year in the United States and Canada. However, contrary to the general belief, this incidence rate was not obtained through a study, but it is an estimation based on 30-year unpublished data from Canada and England. In the present retrospective study from 1985 to 2009, 38 cases of autoerotic deaths were identified in the province of Alberta (Canada). This number corresponds to an incidence of 0.56 autoerotic deaths per million inhabitants per year. The vast majority of these deaths are related to typical, predominantly asphyxial methods, such as hanging. The bodies were most commonly found in basements, bedrooms, and bathrooms. There is no clear evidence of a preferential time of day for these deaths, but there appear to be slightly more autoerotic deaths during summer. The incidence of autoerotic deaths is higher in big cities compared with rural areas. The previously published estimate of 500 to 1000 'autoerotic deaths per year should not be used for Canada. An incidence of 0.2 to 0.5 cases per million inhabitants per year is a better estimate of the incidence of autoerotic deaths. The incidence in United States should be reassessed using epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
21455055 View in PubMed
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Changes in alcohol use in relation to sociodemographic factors in early midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275744
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Daniel Vladimirov
Solja Niemelä
Juha Auvinen
Markku Timonen
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Leena Ala-Mursula
Jaana Laitinen
Jouko Miettunen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 May;44(3):249-57
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To describe changes in alcohol use in relation to employment, education and relationship statuses in a general population sample in early midlife using prospective birth cohort data.
In the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (N=5621) alcohol use was studied in participants at two time points: ages 31 and 46. The total mean consumption was calculated and participants were classified into steady drinkers, increasers and reducers based on the change in consumption between the ages of 31 and 46. Multinomial regression analysis was conducted with changes in employment and relationship statuses.
Daily alcohol consumption rose by 30% for men and 40% for women. Persons who were unemployed, single or had a low level of education consumed most. Of the alcohol users, 70% were classified as steady drinkers, 10% as reducers and 20% as increasers. For men, leaving a relationship (odds ratio, OR 1.5; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.0-2.1) predicted increased alcohol use. The predictors of reducing consumption were entering a relationship for men (OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2-2.9) and women (OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.1), and leaving a relationship (OR 2.6; 95% CI: 1.6-4.3) for women.
Alcohol consumption among Finns of northern origin does not seem to decline with age. Alcohol usage is fairly stable in the majority of middle-aged people. A substantial proportion of alcohol users engage in either binge or heavy drinking. Gender differences in predictors exist-- changes in relationship status predict a reduction in alcohol usage in women, whereas in men, divorce predicts an increase in usage.
PubMed ID
26685194 View in PubMed
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Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283820
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jul;45(5):511-519
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
MP Chaparro
X. de Luna
J. Häggström
A. Ivarsson
U. Lindgren
K. Nilsson
I. Koupil
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jul;45(5):511-519
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether women's adult overweight and obesity risk was associated with their childhood family structure, measured as their mothers' marital status history, during the women's first 18 years of life.
Using linked register data, we analyzed 30,584 primiparous women born in Sweden in 1975 who were between 19-35 years of age when their height and pre-pregnancy weight was recorded. The outcomes were women's overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI) = 25 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI = 30 kg/m(2)) and the predictor was mothers' marital status history, which was summarized using sequence analysis. We carried out nested logistic regression models adjusting for women's age and maternal sociodemographic characteristics.
Mothers' marital status history was summarized into six clusters: stable marriage, stable cohabitation, married then divorcing, cohabiting then separating, varied transitions, and not with father. In fully adjusted models and compared with women whose mothers belonged to the stable marriage cluster: (1) women whose mothers belonged to the other marital status clusters had higher odds of overweight/obesity (odds ratio (OR) ranging 1.15-1.19; p
PubMed ID
28482752 View in PubMed
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Children, family and cancer survival in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18521
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Jun 10;105(2):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-2003
Author
Øystein Kravdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. okravdal@econ.uio.no
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Jun 10;105(2):261-6
Date
Jun-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Family
Female
Gravidity
Humans
Infant
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Abstract
Models for all-cause mortality among 45,000 men and women with cancer in 12 different sites were estimated, using register and census data for complete Norwegian birth cohorts. This observed-survival method appeared to be an adequate approach. The results support the idea that women who were pregnant shortly before a breast cancer diagnosis may have a poorer prognosis than others. In principle, such an effect may also reflect that these women have a young child during the follow-up period and are burdened by that. However, this social explanation can hardly be very important, given the absence of a corresponding significant effect in men and for other cancer sites in women. Breast cancer is different from other malignancies also with respect to the effect of parenthood more generally, regardless of the timing of the pregnancies. On the whole, male and female cancer patients with children experience lower mortality than the childless, though without a special advantage associated with adult children. This suggests a social effect, perhaps operating through a link between parenthood, lifestyle and general health. No parity effect was seen for breast cancer, however, which may signal that the social effect is set off against an adverse physiologic effect of motherhood for this particular cancer. Among men, both marriage and parenthood were associated with a good prognosis. Married male cancer patients with children had mortality one-third lower than that among the childless and never-married. Women who had never married did not have the same disadvantage.
PubMed ID
12673689 View in PubMed
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106 records – page 1 of 11.