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IMO-Polar Code : history, content, and shortcomings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297051
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 19 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
“IMO-Polar Code: history, content, and shortcomings” Introduction Due to vulnerability of the marine environment and difficulty in operational conditions, shipping in the Arctic waters is drastically different from the shipping in other areas in the world. Some of the risks involved in
  1 document  
Author
Basaran, Ilker
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 19 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1027653
Keywords
International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Shipping
Arctic
Marine environment
Guidelines
Documents

ASC-Paper_Basaran_Ilker.pdf

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The Nuuk declaration on environment and development in the Arctic. Report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100822
Source
Declaration and report from the Arctic Environment Second Ministerial Conference, September 16, 1993, Nuuk, Greenland
Publication Type
Report
Date
Sep-1993
Author
Arctic Council
Source
Declaration and report from the Arctic Environment Second Ministerial Conference, September 16, 1993, Nuuk, Greenland
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic environment
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP)
Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF)
Habitat conservation
Indigenous knowledge
Marine environment
Radioactive pollution
Abstract
Representatives of the governments of Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, the Russian Federation, Sweden, and the United States of America met on September 16, 1993, at Nuuk, Greeland, for the Second Ministerial Conference on the Protection of the Arctic Environment. The Ministerial Conference was also attended by observers from Chile, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, the United Nations Environment Programme, the Nordic Council, the Northern Forum, the International Arctic Science Committee, the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, the Saami Council, and the Russian Association of Peoples of the North. The Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to protect and preserve the Arctic environment and fully recognized the special relationship of the indigenous peoples and local populations to the Arctic and their unique contribution to the protection of the Arctic environment.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100822.
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Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 6 (pp. 183-335) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Abiotic media
Arctic ecosystems
Bioaccumulation
Biological effects
Biomagnification
Biotic media
Chemical characteristics
Freshwater environments
Marine environments
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Physical characteristics
POP accumulation
Sources
Temporal variation
Terrestrial environments
Toxicology
Abstract
Interest in the presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Arctic aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems arises mainly from concerns that northern and indigenous peoples depending upon traditional food for most of their diet may be adversely affected by chronic exposure to these pollutants. This chapter deals mainly with persistent organochlorine (OC) pollutants as well as organotins.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
Online Resources
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Traditional knowledge relating to Arctic marine species and habitats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297062
Source
Convention on Biological Diversity Arctic Regional Workshop to Facilitate the Description of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs). 3 - 7 March 2014, Helsinki, Finland. 9 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2014
, Traditional Knowledge Initiative), with contributions from Henry Huntington (Pew Charitable Trusts) and Tero Mustonen (Snowchange Cooperative) The marine environment and resources have sustained Indigenous communities in the Arctic for millennia. The intimate association between Arctic peoples and
  1 document  
Author
Vierros, Marjo
Author Affiliation
United Nations University, Traditional Knowledge Initiative
Source
Convention on Biological Diversity Arctic Regional Workshop to Facilitate the Description of Ecologically or Biologically Significant Marine Areas (EBSAs). 3 - 7 March 2014, Helsinki, Finland. 9 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
445912
Keywords
Arctic
Indigenous communities
Marine environment
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
The marine environment and resources have sustained Indigenous communities in the Arctic for millennia. The intimate association between Arctic peoples and their environment has allowed them to survive and has resulted in the accumulation of generations of knowledge about species, their movements, their behavior and ecology, as well as the structure and functioning of the marine environment. The knowledge of Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic is also an important source of information for others wishing to study and understand the Arctic marine system.
This report compiles readily available published information related to traditional knowledge of Arctic marine species and environments that may be of value for the CBD Arctic EBSA workshop. The authors hope that the information can, where relevant, be used to further enhance EBSA submissions. It should be noted that the information presented here is not a comprehensive account of traditional knowledge on Arctic marine species and habitats, given that most such information is not published, and the information that does exist is often fragmented and difficult to access.
The information is compiled in three tables: 1. Information related to marine species; 2. Information related to oceanography, marine habitats and climate change; and 3. Information related to human uses and culturally significant areas. There is also a more general bibliography at the end of this document, as well as a map of Arctic Indigenous Peoples.
Documents

ebsaws-2014-01-submission-unutk-en.pdf

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