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11 records – page 1 of 2.

An exploration on the effects of marijuana on eyewitness memory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206132
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 1998;21(1):117-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998

Are "traditional" sex differences less conspicuous in young cannabis users than in other young people?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11545
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 1994 Jul-Sep;26(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Pape
T. Hammer
P. Vaglum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Youth Research Centre, Oslo.
Source
J Psychoactive Drugs. 1994 Jul-Sep;26(3):257-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Mental health
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recent research has revealed conspicuously few distinctions between young males and females who use cannabis. Such findings may reflect the general slackening of the sex-role pattern in the younger generations. Alternatively, they may reflect distinctive characteristics of the cannabis culture. Using data from a nationwide representative sample (n = 1,478) of young Norwegians (21-24 years old), this study explores whether "traditional" sex differences in respect to mental health and alcohol use are less conspicuous among users than among nonusers of cannabis. The respondents' sex-role-related values and preferences were also studied. Results indicate that the sex differences in mental health did not vary between users and nonusers of cannabis; however, female cannabis users were disproportionately young when they experienced their first intoxication by alcohol. Their level of drinking was also disproportionately high. This implied that the sex difference in alcohol use was smaller among users than among nonusers: male users of cannabis consumed 2.8 times more alcohol than their female counterparts, whereas the corresponding male to female ratio was 3:2 in the nonusers. The extensive use of alcohol in female cannabis users did not reflect mental health problems or a rejection of traditional sex-role characteristics. Cannabis-using males were less typically masculine in their values and preferences than other males, but not more feminine. The measures for sex-role-related preferences did not discriminate between female users and female nonusers of cannabis.
PubMed ID
7844655 View in PubMed
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Attraction to cannabis among men with schizophrenia: a phenomenological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143991
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Mar;42(1):132-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Nathalie Francoeur
Cynthia Baker
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry/Mental Health, Edmundston Regional Hospital, Edmundston, New Brunswick, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Mar;42(1):132-49
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
New Brunswick
Relaxation Therapy
Schizophrenia - nursing
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Self Medication
Abstract
Cannabis use is common among persons with schizophrenia, particularly among men with this long-term chronic illness.A phenomenological study was undertaken to describe the perceptions of persons with schizophrenia regarding their attraction to cannabis. A sample of 8 men with schizophrenia who were living in the community and who had a history of current or past cannabis use were recruited by health professionals. Data were collected through in-depth interviewing and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Colaizzi's phenomenological method was used to analyze the interview data.The findings indicate that cannabis is used as a means of satisfying the schizophrenia-related need for relaxation, sense of self-worth, and distraction.The findings may be useful for nurses working with persons who have schizophrenia, a population that is frequently stigmatized and unheard.
PubMed ID
20420097 View in PubMed
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Does smoking cannabis affect work commitment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127629
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Christer Hyggen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Social Research, Elisenberg, Oslo, Norway. chy@nova.no
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1309-15
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Personnel Loyalty
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the associations between cannabis use and work commitment.
We used a 25-year panel survey initiated in 1985 with follow-ups in 1987, 1989, 1993, 2003 and 2010. Registered data from a range of public registers were matched with individual responses for the entire period.
The panel survey was a nation-wide study set in Norway.
A total of 1997 respondents born between 1965 and 1968 were included in the panel.
Work involvement scale (WIS) was used to assess work commitment. Involvement with cannabis was based on self-reported smoking of cannabis within the last 12 months and exposure to cannabis through friends. This information was categorized into 'abstaining', 'exposed', 'experimented' and 'involved'. Control measures included socio-economic background, mental health (HSCL-10), education, work satisfaction, unemployment, receipt of social assistance, consumption of alcohol, alcohol-related problems and use of other illicit drugs.
The level of work commitment was associated with involvement with cannabis. In 1993, when the respondents were in their mid-20s, those who were involved or had experimented with cannabis displayed lower levels of work commitment than those who were abstaining or merely exposed to cannabis through friends (P
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2012 Jul;107(7):1316-722672377
PubMed ID
22276981 View in PubMed
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Drug helplines and adult marijuana users: An assessment in Washington, Colorado, Oregon, and Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296228
Source
Subst Abus. 2018 01 02; 39(1):3-5
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-02-2018
Author
Beatriz H Carlini
Sharon B Garrett
Author Affiliation
a Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute , University of Washington , Seattle , Washington , USA.
Source
Subst Abus. 2018 01 02; 39(1):3-5
Date
01-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Colorado
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hotlines - standards
Humans
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Oregon
Patient Simulation
Program Evaluation - statistics & numerical data
Washington
Abstract
Drug helplines are well-known and widely utilized resources for those seeking help with managing their substance use. Using "secret shoppers," a preliminary assessment of the drug helplines in 4 states was performed. Eleven calls were placed to the helpline staff, where the secret shopper posed as an adult users of marijuana interested in decreasing their marijuana use and asked questions about cannabinoids and methods of marijuana consumption. In 100% of the calls placed, helpline staff had no knowledge about the effects and interactions of marijuana's 2 main components (tetrahydrocannabinol [THC] and cannabidiol [CBD]), neither could they explain the risk differential of smoking, eating, or vaporizing marijuana. In all but one of the calls placed, helpline responders were respectful and empathic. The assessment suggests that drug helplines are equipped with a respectful, empathetic, and nonjudgmental staff who lack important knowledge to best serve those seeking help for marijuana use.
PubMed ID
28715253 View in PubMed
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How much can you drink before driving? The influence of riding with impaired adults and peers on the driving behaviors of urban and rural youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158285
Source
Addiction. 2008 Apr;103(4):629-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Bonnie J Leadbeater
Kathleen Foran
Aidan Grove-White
Author Affiliation
Centre for Youth and Society, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. bleadbea@uvic.ca
Source
Addiction. 2008 Apr;103(4):629-37
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Attitude to Health
Automobile Driving - psychology - standards
British Columbia
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk-Taking
Rural Health
Urban health
Abstract
Following an ecological model to specify risks for impaired driving, we assessed the effects of youth attitudes about substance use and their experiences of riding in cars with adults and peers who drove after drinking alcohol or smoking cannabis on the youths' own driving after drinking or using cannabis.
Participants were 2594 students in grades 10 and 12 (mean age = 16 years and 2 months; 50% girls) from public high schools in urban (994) and rural communities (1600) on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada; 1192 of these were new drivers with restricted licenses. Self-report data were collected in anonymous questionnaires. Regression analyses were used to assess the independent and interacting effects of youth attitudes about substance use and their experiences of riding in cars with adults or peers who drove after drinking alcohol or smoking cannabis on youth driving.
Youth driving risk behaviors were associated independently with their own high-risk attitudes and experiences riding with peers who drink alcohol or use cannabis and drive. However, risks were highest for the youth who also report more frequent experiences of riding with adults who drink alcohol or use cannabis and drive.
Prevention efforts should be expanded to include the adults and peers who are role models for new drivers and to increase youths' awareness of their own responsibilities for their personal safety as passengers.
PubMed ID
18339107 View in PubMed
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"I couldn't say, I'm not a girl"--adolescents talk about gender and marijuana use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151694
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jun;68(11):2029-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Rebecca J Haines
Joy L Johnson
Connie I Carter
Kamal Arora
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. rebecca.haines@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jun;68(11):2029-36
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Abstract
In this paper we report on findings from a qualitative study of marijuana use by adolescents in two communities in British Columbia, Canada. During 2005 and 2006, 45 interviews were carried out at schools with students aged 13-18, with an aim of understanding how adolescents perceive their experiences with marijuana to be shaped by gender. While it has been established that patterns of use differ for girls and boys, there is relatively little qualitative research addressing marijuana smoking as gendered social practice. Drawing from contemporary social theories of gender our analysis explores the normative functions of gender discourse within adolescents' narratives, situating their descriptions of marijuana use within the context of the research interview and within the social contexts of drug use. The results highlight the challenges we encountered in asking about gender during one-to-one interviews, juxtaposed with examples from the narratives that illustrate how boys and girls use marijuana as a way of "doing" gender. To conclude, we suggest how our findings can inform the design of gender-specific health messaging on adolescent marijuana use.
PubMed ID
19345464 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal associations of cannabis and illicit drug use with depression, suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts among Nova Scotia high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120085
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Apr 1;129(1-2):49-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Daniel Rasic
Swarna Weerasinghe
Mark Asbridge
Donald B Langille
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, 5790 University Avenue, Halifax, NS B3H 1V7, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013 Apr 1;129(1-2):49-53
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcoholism - psychology
Algorithms
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk assessment
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To examine associations of cannabis and other illicit drug use with depression, suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts over a two year period during adolescence.
Nine hundred and seventy-six school students in four high schools in northern Nova Scotia, Canada, were surveyed in grade 10 and followed up in grade 12. Assessments of past 30 day cannabis and illicit drug use as well as mental health variables (risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts) were obtained at baseline (2000 and 2001) and follow-up two years later (2002 and 2003). Generalized estimating equations modelled depression, suicidal ideation and attempts among illicit drug users and non-users.
Illicit drug use with or without cannabis use was significantly associated with higher odds of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Heavy cannabis use alone predicted depression but not suicidal ideation or attempt.
Illicit drug use, with and without accompanying cannabis use, among high school students increases the risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts. Heavy cannabis use alone predicts depression but not suicidal ideation or attempts.
PubMed ID
23041136 View in PubMed
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Older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger adolescents as sexual partners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9285
Source
Adolescence. 2004;39(156):627-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Kristinn Hegna
Svein Mossige
Lars Wichstrøm
Author Affiliation
kristinn.hegna@nova.no
Source
Adolescence. 2004;39(156):627-51
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Attitude
Child
Coitus - psychology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Norway
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Abstract
The prevalence of older adolescents' positive attitudes toward younger sexual partners was investigated through three measures of self-reported hypothetical likelihood of having sex with preadolescents and younger adolescents (LSA), using a school-based cluster sample of 710 Norwegian 18- to 19-year-olds attending nonvocational high schools in Oslo. Some likelihood of having sex with a preadolescent (less than 12 years of age) was reported by 5.9% of the males. The 19.1% of the males who indicated some likelihood of having sex with a 13- to 14-year old, compared to those who did not, reported more high-frequency drinking, more alcohol-related problems, earlier sexual initiation, more conduct problems, and poorer psychosocial adjustment. This subgroup also reported more high-frequency use of pornography, having more friends with an interest in child pornography and violent pornography, and greater use of coercion to obtain sexual favors.
PubMed ID
15727404 View in PubMed
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Self-esteem and the initiation of substance use among adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114416
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jan-Feb;104(1):e60-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chris G Richardson
Jae-Young Kwon
Pamela A Ratner
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC. chris.richardson@ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jan-Feb;104(1):e60-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Risk factors
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Smoking - psychology
Abstract
To investigate differences in the relationship between self-esteem and the initiation of substance use (tobacco, alcohol and marijuana) among male and female secondary school students in British Columbia.
The data were collected in the 2010 fall and 2011 spring cycles of the British Columbia Adolescent Substance Use Survey (BASUS). The sample consisted of 1,267 adolescents (57% female) in Grades 8 and 9. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the extent to which self-esteem and gender, and their interaction, influenced the odds of having initiated substance use at baseline and at follow-up 6 months later.
For each one-point increase on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, there was a reduction in the odds of initiating substance use by up to 9% for tobacco, 3% for alcohol, and 7% for marijuana. The relationships between self-esteem and the initiation of tobacco and alcohol use varied by gender, with boys having slightly less robust associations at the baseline assessment.
The results suggest that self-esteem is protective against the initiation of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Researchers are advised to consider the interactive effects of gender in future longitudinal research examining the relationship between self-esteem and the initiation of substance use, including implications related to the development of substance use prevention programs.
PubMed ID
23618108 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.